Auntie Em, It’s Six Sharknadoes!

Come a little closer.

Can we talk about something… embarrassing?

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I really really like the Sharknado movies. Ever since I was a young lad working in the smallest shafts of the coal mines where full-grown adults could not fit, I’ve loved movies that are intentionally stupid, that make fun of themselves. In formative days, these included Attack of the Killer Tomatoes and The Toxic Avenger. Later I  grew to love bad movies that didn’t know how bad they were, such as Dante’s Peak and Galaxina.

But today we live in a golden age, a time when movies about shark tornadoes are made by the half-dozen! Their premise, as I recall, is that strange weather patterns over the ocean result in, wait for it, tornadoes that are filled with sharks. Tornadoes. In the air. Filled with sharks. Reflect on that for a moment.

The basic plot of each movie is that people are being killed by flying sharks and everything appears to be hopeless. Our hero, Fin Shepard, tries to reunite his family, save kids trapped on a school bus and generally preserve the future of humankind. Meanwhile, flying sharks eat people. On the fly. In the air.

A dumb idea, but one that knows it’s dumb! In one of the later movies a character says something like, “How can these sharks breathe in the air?” And therein lies the beauty of this series. Nothing is remotely believable or possible, yet people continue to get eaten by sharks.

But it’s the sheer ridiculousness of, well, everything that makes this movie dynasty so entertaining. Take for example one moment from the third entry in the series. A minor character loses one arm, two arms, one leg, two legs via shark attacks. In a last ditch effort to save everyone else, he pushes a self-destruct button with his head (remember, no limbs), thereby destroying many sharks, as well as himself. Our savior Fin comments, “It’s too late. We can’t save him.” C’est magnifique!

Moments like this are plentiful. It’s kind of like Mystery Science Theater, except the commentators are in the movie rather than watching it. These shark movies just might fill the void in your chest that sucks you dry each and every night after work. (Note: Sharknado is not guaranteed to fill the void in your chest that sucks you dry each and every night after work.)

Titles in this educational series include Sharknado (2013), Sharknado 2: The Second One (2014), Sharknado 3: Oh Hell No! (2015), Sharknado: The 4th Awakens (2016), Sharknado 5: (Global Swarming) and The Last Sharknado: It’s About Time! (2018).

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So take a little chance, if you’re feeling lucky, and check out this series. And remember, wait 60 minutes after eating before watching Sharknado.

Did You Know? (Shark Edition)

book coverAfter eating a large meal weighing 65 pounds, a great white shark will not need to eat for another 45 days!

I found this information on page 19 of Animal Lives: Sharks by Sally Morgan. This kids’ book is fascinating! I also learned that there are some sharks bigger than a bus. Children of all ages can learn about these amazing animals: where they live; how they grow and learn; what they eat; and the dangers they face.

There are over 350 different kinds of sharks. Sharkabet, A Sea of Sharks from A to Z by Ray Troll has drawings of living and extinct sharks and rays with interesting and accurate information about their biology and evolution. Kids will love seeing the colorful artwork while learning their ABCs.

DVD coverI don’t know about you, but I hear “shark” and I think Jaws!  Ah yes, the movie terrified millions of people and kept thousands out of the water. The book by Peter Benchley is a gripping read too. But I’m not sure I would read it at the beach.

Sandra Markle writes a children’s series of books about animals. Great White Sharks has colorful photographs with lots of action and information so interesting that kids won’t even know they’re learning. Among her many other titles are Killer Whales, Lions and Outside and Inside Kangaroos.

Still hungry for more shark books? Look for the call number 597 in either adult or juvenile books.

Linda