It’s Elemental

Does the world seem a tad chaotic lately? Whether it is the world of politics, social interaction or even the horrors of the recent snopocalypse, things definitely seem to be in a state of flux. But there is an order out there if you look for it. What if I told you that you could take all of the elements that make up you, the world and all of the universe and chart it all neatly and precisely on a table? Yes I’m talking about that grand creation: The Periodic Table.

2019 is a great year to rediscover the wonders of the periodic table. You see, this very year is The International Year of the Periodical Table as declared by none other than the United Nations. It is in honor of the 150th anniversary of the table’s surprisingly contentious creation. So why not light a candle against the chaos of our times and celebrate some order this year. As always, the Everett Public Library has your back with some excellent books to help you learn about the Periodic Table. Read on to learn more.

A great place to start when it comes to learning about the periodic table are the excellent works of Theodore Gray. Throw away your preconceptions about scientific information being boring and stuffy and revel in the gorgeous design, clarity of presentation, and downright intriguing facts presented in his books. Begin with The Elements: A Visual Exploration of Every Known Atom in the Universe which includes a beautiful photo of each element, key facts and features, and the signature wit that Gray is known for.  Move on to Molecules: The Elements and the Architecture of Everything to learn how the elements combine to form compounds that clean, corrode and explode, complete with gorgeous pictures of course.  And complete your journey with Reactions: An Illustrated Exploration of Elements, Molecules, and Change in the Universe to see how the molecules react with each other to form the chemical basis of our very existence, all beautifully illustrated as you would expect.

Now that you have gotten an excellent introduction to the periodic table from Mr. Gray, it is time to delve into the shocking, at times seedy, and always fascinating history of the elements themselves. Learn how the Lewis and Clark expedition’s use of mercury laxatives allowed historians to discover their route across the west by mapping mercury tinged latrines in Sam Kean’s The Disappearing Spoon and Other True Tales of Madness, Love and the History of the World from the Periodic Table. Cringe at the fashion for radium chocolate, beer and contraceptives after Marie and Pierre Curie’s discovery of that element in Hugh Aldersey-Williams’ Periodic Tales: the Curious Lives of the Elements. And finally, be horrified by the slaughter and cruelty that occurs during the Spanish Conquistador’s relentless pursuit of gold and silver in John Browne’s Seven Elements that Have Changed the World.

So revel in a little stability and learn more about the periodic table during its 150th anniversary year, even if you only consult it periodically (insert groan here).