Listen Up! New Fall Music Arrivals

Collage of album covers

KT Tunstall – KIN (Caroline Records) – acoustic-guitar-driven power-pop. A little folky, very laid back.

Bobby Rush – Porcupine Meat (Rounder) –  blues, funk, and a heavy horn section act as your guides through what sounds like one heck of a breakup.

Charlie Hunter – Everybody Has a Plan Until They Get Punched in the Mouth (Ground Up) – irresistible instrumental blues with NOLA-style jazz brass accompaniment.

Skye & Ross – Skye & Ross (Fly Agaric Records; Cooking Vinyl Limited) –  Skye & Ross is a side project of British trip-hop legends, Morecheeba.  It should be no surprise then that this album is packed with ethereal, sensual, downtempo. jazz, rock, soul, and trip-hop goodness. This seems to be classified as an electronic release everywhere, probably because of the band’s lineage but to me it listens more like a very low-key indie rock album.

Madeleine Peyroux – Secular Hymns (Impulse!) – beautiful vocal jazz with blues, folk, and swing undertones.

Amanda Shires – My Piece of Land (BMG Rights Management) – soft, gentle country music with a touch of folk.

Gallant – Ology (Mind of a Genius Records; Warner Bros. Records)  – smooth and loungy RnB that makes you want to get up and dance.

Jamie Lidell – Building a Beginning (Jajulin) – Lidell departs from his electronic music roots to produce a smooth and soulful RnB record. Listeners can catch a strong Stevie Wonder influence in his sound, but it doesn’t go as far as parroting.

Pretenders – Alone (BMG Rights Management) – at times sultry, at others, gritty. This driving 10th release from frontwoman Crissie Hynde is apologetically irreverent and brutally honest.

Saint Motel – saintmotelevision (Elektra Records) – eclectic alternative rock. A strong gospel influence and an upbeat horn section give this release a lot of energy and depth.

St. Paul and the Broken Bones – Sea of Noise (Records) – a solid neo-soul album with lots of groove. Thought-provoking lyrics explore the issues of racial violence, political turmoil, and the everyday struggles of faith and love.

Older Titles, Newly Added

Hardcore Traxx: Dance Mania Records 1986-1997 (Strut Records) – Anyone interested in the history of house music needs to give this collection a listen. It’s like a musical time machine to Chicago in the 1980s.

Only 4U: The Sound of Cajmere & Cajual Records 1992-2012 (Strut Records) – Get in that musical time machine to Chicago and fast forward 10 years. This collection picks up on the Chicago sound from where the Hardcore Traxx collection leaves off.

Lilac Girls by Martha Hall Kelly

Lilac Girls by Martha Hall Kelly

lilacgirlsI really liked this story! Set during WWII, this book presents the experiences of three very different women in separate locations but told simultaneously.

First we have Caroline Ferriday in New York working with the French Consulate trying to help the displaced children and families there. Next is Polish teenager Kasia Kuzmerick working as a courier for the underground resistance. And lastly there is German Doctor Herta Oberheuser.

Kasia and her sister Zuzanna end up getting arrested and sent to Ravensbrück concentration camp for women, which is where Herta ends up working. While the separate characters paths finally do cross, it is much later in the tale that we get the full impact of the interactions between them.

I kept waiting for the three stories to tie together. They all seemed so separate from one another at first. My patience paid off, and there was a wonderful denouement in the end! It was truly a wonderful story of courage and hardships.

PAWS to Read at the Everett Public Library

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Madeline Finn and the Library Dog by Lisa Papp is a wonderful new picture book. Madeline Finn DOES NOT like to read. Not books. Not magazines. Not even the menu on the ice cream truck. But Madeline Finn DOES want a gold star from her teacher. Stars are for good readers. Stars are for understanding words. And saying them out loud. Fortunately, Madeline Finn meets Bonnie, a library dog. Reading out loud to Bonnie isn’t so bad. When Madeline Finn gets stuck, Bonnie doesn’t mind. Madeline Finn can pet her until she figures the word out. As it turns out, it’s fun to read when you’re not afraid of making mistakes. Bonnie teaches Madeline Finn that it’s okay to go slow. And to keep trying. Just like the sticker says.

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Did you know that the Everett Public Library has just such a program?  It’s called PAWS to Read and happens at the Evergreen Branch on Mondays from 3 to 5 PM and at the Main Library on Tuesdays from 3:30 until 5:00 PM. This program runs through December 13th, 2016, but will start up again in January. We have wonderful dog and human volunteers who come to the library faithfully each week to help our children learn to read.

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The dogs act as an incentive for the children to read more and to read better. Dogs are viewed as a non-threatening entity to promote reading, writing, and increased interaction and social skills in the child. As a result, children experience higher reading levels and higher levels of word recognition as well as word comprehension.

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The dogs used in this program are especially calm and unobtrusive and settle in as part of the class. The children view the dogs as lovable and non-judgmental, which are the keys to success in this program. Children report that the dogs give them confidence because the dog does not make fun of them if they read slowly or mess up pronouncing a word. The dogs are great listeners and give the child a sense of comfort while reading. Children have been known to practice with their personal pets at home in preparation for the Paws to Read dogs.

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Come on down to the library just like Madeline Finn and meet our PAWS to Read dogs. They’re awesome!

Titles of Intrigue

Here at the library, we really appreciate a good book title. Whether we are selecting, shelving, weeding or checking them out, we deal with a lot of library items throughout our careers. When you come across a title that you find intriguing, it is hard not to have admiration for its ability to stand out in a very large crowd. This is especially true when it comes to ordering books. While selecting, I scan many lists of books from several sources and have to admit that sometimes it is hard to keep my eyes from glazing over while trying to determine if titles like Algebra I for Dummies are a good fit for the collection.

But thankfully there are exceptions. Here are a number of new and on-order books with titles that might pique your interest as they have mine. While I can’t guarantee they will deliver on the promise of their intriguing titles, they are definitely worth a look. I’ve also taken a page from our Spot-Lit posts and have presented the covers in a slideshow so you can enjoy the titles in all their glory. Simply click on a book cover to view the show. Enjoy!

Unmentionable: the Victorian Lady’s Guide to Sex, Marriage, and Manners by Therese Oneill

The Hidden Life of Trees: What They Feel, How They Communicate by Peter Wohlleben

The Sick Bag Song by Nick Cave

Against Everything: Essays by Mark Greif

The Aliens Are Coming!: The Extraordinary Science Behind Our Search for Life in the Universe by Ben Miller

Wonderland: How Play Made the Modern World by Steven Johnson

The Wasp that Brainwashed the Caterpillar: Evolutions Most Unbelievable Solutions to Life’s Biggest Problems by Matt Simon

Void: The Strange Physics of Nothing by James Weatherall

The Thieves of Threadneedle Street: the Incredible True Story of the American Forgers Who Nearly Broke the Bank of England by Nicholas Booth

Star Wars Propaganda : A History of Persuasive Art in the Galaxy by Pablo Hidalgo

Sad Animal Facts by Brooke Barker

Not Dead Yet: the Memoir by Phil Collins

Murder & Mayhem in Seattle by Teresa Nordheim

Grizzlyshark by Ryan Ottley

Cattail Moonshine & Milkweed Medicine: the Curious Stories of 43 Amazing North American Native Plants by Tammi Hartung

Beethoven’s Skull: Dark, Strange, and Fascinating Tales from the World of Classical Music and Beyond by Tim Rayborn

 

NaNoReMo

November is National Novel Writing Month, aka NaNoWriMo. Write-ins are happening all over the place, including the library. And some people even go a step further: they become published authors as a result of their hard work and dedication to the craft of writing. How cool is that? One year my husband and I decided that we would each write a novel during NaNoWriMo. While we would be writing vastly different stories and not exactly collaborating, we wrote side-by-side in the same room and bounced ideas and grammar conundrums off of each other. Neither one of us finished our novels, but we had a lot of fun and learned more about each other as a result. Which, let me tell you, after being together for almost half your lives is something special indeed!

But this isn’t a post about NaNoWriMo. This is about a new moniker I am giving November: NaNoReMo, which stands for National Novel Reading Month. Reading books out loud together is something my husband and I have done on multiple occasions. Sharing an experience with someone can definitely bring you closer together, and sharing the experience and enjoyment of a book together is one of my top things for us to do as a couple. It’s free, doesn’t take much time, and can sometimes even be done while doing otherwise mundane or boring tasks. I’m going to share with you a few of our favorite books that we have read together, which will hopefully spark your own imagination and enthusiasm!

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The time we read to each other: Dad is Fat by Jim Gaffigan
One of the best things about reading a Jim Gaffigan book is when you can get your hands on an audio recording of it and hear him read it to you. As huge fans of Jimbo, we were tempted to go that route. But instead we decided it would be fun to try reading each other alternating chapters. You read chapter 1, I’ll read chapter 2. One of the best things about this method was sometimes one or the other of us would be sleepy and not be up for reading that night. That’s okay; the other person was ready with the bedtime story. I might be sharing too much of myself here, but there is nothing I love hearing more than the sound of my husband’s voice. When he would read to me, I could feel the stress of the day melt away and if I was awake enough I’d be laughing right along with him as he read. I don’t know if he feels the same way about my voice, but I definitely returned the favor. It was a great balance and the fact that the book’s content was about an experience we haven’t yet shared, parenthood, made the experience educational as well.

2-ready-player-oneThe time we listened to an audiobook instead of watching TV: Ready Player One by Ernest Cline
When Ready Player One first came out it didn’t even become a tiny blip on my radar. It’s the worst-kept secret that I detest dystopian novels, and this promised to fit the bill. But then the library acquired the audiobook and I saw that it was read by Wil Wheaton. After a quick fangirl dance of joy I promptly checked it out. On the drive home from work that night I listened to the beginning of the story, and over the next couple of weeks I finished the first few discs on my commute. It was a great way to pass the time while fighting rush hour traffic, but I had a better idea. I knew this story would appeal to my husband, so that night I brought the whole set into the house, set up some equipment, and started from the beginning. We were both riveted, and over the next several days we skipped the usual evening television programming in favor of listening to Wesley Crusher relate the story of Wade Watts and his journey into the OASIS system in search of James Halliday’s three keys and, hopefully, his ticket out of poverty.

3-the-martianThe time we read the same book back-to-back: The Martian by Andy Weir
This was another not-on-my-radar book that I almost missed. A few months before the Matt Damon movie was to be released in theaters, my husband read a story about the movie and knew he wanted to see the movie but read the book first. He devoured the book. I mean, he’s a quick reader anyway compared to my reading speed, but in this case he actually lost sleep in favor of finding out if astronaut Mark Watney, who was stranded on Mars for several years, ever made it back to Earth or not. He then began his campaign to get me to read it, too. Our reading tastes don’t often overlap so we aren’t in the habit of pestering each other to read a book we enjoyed. But this was different. He warned me about some technical jargon and heavy use of math (what does that say about me, that I need a math trigger warning?) but said the humor and writing style would win me over, and the suspense would keep me up as well. While I admit that I started reading the book in a thinly-veiled attempt to shut him up, the joke was on me. I absolutely loved it, and consider myself fortunate to have read the book before seeing the movie. Through no real effort my brain read the book in Matt Damon‘s voice.

4-romeo-and-or-julietThe time we will take turns choosing how the book goes: Romeo and/or Juliet by Ryan North
So I don’t know about you, but my Octobers are always super-busy, very stressful, and as a result I always get sick. This year was no exception. It was such a struggle to get through the month that November has so far been a kind of recuperation period. That’s all ending this Veterans Day when both my husband and I will finally have some quality time together. We’ve planned to read this book by Ryan North, aka one of the funniest guys in comics today, aka the crazy mad awesome genius behind The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl series for Marvel. He has reworked Shakespeare so that the reader gets to choose the ending. That’s right; it’s a choose your own adventure for adults, and it has been sitting on our shelf at home for months collecting dust, waiting for its turn in the TBR. Our plan is for one of us to read while the other one drives; that is to say if I’m reading, he’s telling me which choice he wants as we go along. I really can’t wait for this one, as it’s another new type of book that is sure to help rejuvenate our spirits before we plan to travel back home for the holidays (stress x 1000).

So there you have it. Whether you’ve been married for decades or just swiped right, I urge you to file this one away in your relationship database. Let’s make America read again!

What’s New in the Northwest?

By my amazingly accurate calculations, Everett Public Library added 160+ rock and country albums that were released in 2016 to its CD collection. Of those, 15 albums are by Northwest artists. So what’s hoppin’ in America’s upper left-hand corner? Let’s find out, shall we?

thermalsWe’ll start in the southern quadrant of the PNW. Portland has an explosive music scene, and many of the local acts have gained national recognition. One of the more successful PDX bands is indie rockers the Thermals, and their latest album, We Disappear, shows that the success is deserved. Featuring music that’s loud and raw yet still intimate, We Disappear is filled with fun, fuzzy, lo-fi power pop and heavy lyrics touching on the ability of technology to isolate people. If you like energetic and edgy rock, check this one out.

esperanzaAnother Portland success story is bassist, singer and songwriter Esperanza Spalding. No slouch, Spalding has won four Grammy Awards, was Jazz Artist of the year in 2011 and was selected by Obama to play at the Nobel Peace Prize Concert in 2009. (This elicits an involuntary Wow! from me.) Her latest, 2016’s Emily’s d+evolution, is hard to categorize. Elements of jazz, rock and funk pervade the album, and songs vary wildly in feel and style. The music is poppy yet bizarre. For those living beyond the edge of our musical galaxy, this is an outstanding album.

Other Portland releases include the dreamy folk pop of M. Ward on More Rain, Distortland by garage rockers The Dandy Warhols and the metal stylings of The Body on No One Deserves Happiness.

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Next stop to the north is Seattle.

carseatheadrestCar Seat Headrest began as Will Toledo’s lo-fi recording project, releasing 12 albums on Bandcamp and developing a large online following. He signed a deal with Matador Records in 2015 and just this year began touring with a full band. Teens of Denial, the band’s 2016 release, takes the group in a new direction while retaining Toledo’s strong songwriting and trademark lo-fi sensibility. The music is quite varied from song to song, always staying close to the world of pop, but also exploring post-punk and other quirky genres. The album has been well-received and points to great things yet to come.

7yearbitch7 Year Bitch was an all-female punk band that played from 1990 to 1997, so it might seem odd that they’re included in a review of 2016 releases. Well, a recently-found recording of the group performing at Seattle’s Club Moe in 1996 was released in 2016 as Live at Moe. Fortuitously, this performance came when 7 Year Bitch was at its peak, so the CD is a most excellent listen. Lyrics are filled with social commentary and the music leans toward a riot grrrl/punk aesthetic. If you prefer the raw DIY sound, check this one out.

Other Seattle releases include Beautiful Broken by long-time rockers Heart, Tacocat’s mixture of pop-punk and feminism on Lost Time, the noise rock of So Pitted on Neo and the psychedelic garage rock of Night Beats on Who Sold My Generation.

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 Finally, a short hop on I-5 takes us to Everett.

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In the last two years the Everett music scene has, well, started to exist! A crop of bands are playing shows, releasing albums and having success. 2016 saw the release of two local 3-song EP’s, What Is Crystal Desert? by Crystal Desert and Walking Blind by Tellers (the band formerly known as Preacher’s Wife). Crystal Desert describes itself as post-punk, garage and psychedelic, and this seems fairly accurate. Their music has a mix of influences from the dark side, crunchy guitars, a bit of a heavy sound. Overall their offering is quite enjoyable, and these lads show the potential for better things yet to come. Walking Blind is filled with slow tempos and dramatic vocals, music akin to soundtracks and the stuff found in dreams. Tellers self-describe as dark and heavy with a post-rock influence. Check out both of these groups to see what’s going on in your own town!

And this is just scratching the surface of Northwest rock. Check out our ever-expanding Local Music collection to find some more gems. And yes, we have a New Music display as well! In the immortal words of the Ramones: We want you to check out some groovy CDs from your local library!

Spot-Lit for November 2016

Spot-Lit

These titles – from established, new, and emerging authors – are some of the most anticipated new releases of the month, based on advance reviews and book world enthusiasm.

Click here to see all of these titles in the Everett Public Library catalog, where you can read reviews or summaries and place holds. Or click on a book cover below to enlarge it, or to view the covers as a slide show.

Notable New Fiction 2016 (to date) | All On-Order Fiction.