No Where to Go But Up

I’m a boomer and I’m married to one. Our birth years fall before and after the peak year 1957, when 4.3 million baby boomers were born. Growing older is not an option it’s a fact and I’m not alone.

Consider this statistic: “as of 2016, the number of baby boomers ranged from 74.1 million to 81.3 million, depending on whether the generation begins with the birth year 1943 or 1946. By 2056, the population 65 years and over is projected to become larger than the population under 18 years.”  (Information cited from The Baby Boom Cohort in the United States.) The question is how golden will baby boomers ‘golden years’ be.

My folks are both still alive in their 80’s and for the most part independent. They provide me a glimpse into what my later years might well look like. When I began reading Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters in the End by Atul Gawande it was like I’d been given a key to unlocking some of the mystery to changes I’d seen in my folks  granting me a greater understanding of those changes.

Over the past several years my mother has had two orthopedic surgeries and has elected to not have another because of the long grueling process of getting back to a measure of normality. Consequently the severe arthritis she suffers from will eventually limit her mobility, which we’ve briefly discussed.

My Dad has been on blood thinners most of his adult life prompted by a surgery gone awry in his 30’s. While he celebrated his 70th skiing Sun Valley, he has slowed down considerably. A bypass surgery and circulation issues have taken a toll despite his disciplined diet and exercise. On my husband’s side we have had the unique experience of participating in hospice care for both his dad and mom; the one in their own home the other in ours.

You need look no farther than the evening news to hear about the latest medication to ‘ask your doctor about’ with a promise of eliminating the discomforts of getting older. The good news is that there is more hope than advertisements suggest for staying youthful and finding anti-aging supplements.

There are many books on staying young, but I recently came across several books on the subject of aging which is what attracted me to Gawande’s book and taking a candid look at this topic. I recently listened to a local webinar about servicing the aging population in our libraries giving me food for thought and leading me to investigate what our library has available on the subject.

Popular blogger Ashton Applewhite writes This Chair that Rocks. The library has her latest book by the same title This Chair Rocks: A Manifesto Against Ageism. Applewhite is passionate about the subject, and is widely recognized as somewhat of an expert by the American Society on Aging. She asserts that stigmas associated with aging are largely overlooked when it comes to marketing, despite the fact that the ‘silver market’ is the fastest growing. Advertisers cater to 15 to 35 year olds. For a well-researched look at this topic, this is the book that looks to be very relevant.

I remember when I turned 50 years old and felt enthusiastic to make some sort of contribution to society, as if raising a family and working the greater portion of my life wasn’t enough. I surveyed my first 50 years and rationalized that the larger portion of my life had passed and if anything meaningful and creative were to occur I’d best get started.  Laurie Russell’s Journey to 50: How to Live with Gratitude, Grace, and the Effects of Gravity captures the same spirit I once aspired to. She offers women a practical approach to navigating the 50th decade, sprinkled with humor and spiritual insights. Here is a quote: Giving up is easy. Letting go takes effort and can be painful- but it frees you to become anew.

Eric B. Larson, MD is an expert on the science and subject of healthy aging. He has spent much of the past 40 years studying the aging process. From our own backyard in the Pacific Northwest, Dr. Larson is a clinical professor of medicine at the University Of Washington School Of Medicine and of health services at the UW School of Public Health. He has worked and cared for thousands of elderly people. In his book Enlightened Aging: Building Resilience for a Long Active Life, co-authored with journalist Joan DeClaire, Dr. Larson shares case studies giving the reader a scientific and medical perspective. Right up front he states “There is no magic bullet’,” He believes resilience in those who age well is born out of their capacity to adapt and grow stronger in the face of adversity and stress. The book discusses key concepts that contribute to individuals in the aging process. They are proactivity, acceptance, and the three reservoirs: mental, physical, and social.

If Our Bodies Could Talk a Guide to Operating and Maintaining a Human Body by James Hamblin M.D. is not solely about aging. It contains a plethora of subjects addressing an exhaustive list of questions; questions you may want to ask your doctor but think are too silly to ask. Take for example these two: How much sleep do I actually need? and Can I train myself to sleep less? This book is broken up into six categories associated with the body and how various parts operate. There are hand drawn diagrams that combine entertainment with educational answers, breaking up what might otherwise have been too technical. Whether you read one or two sections, you will find plenty of practical advice including the main topic of this blog: ‘Enduring: the dying parts.’ I really enjoyed the book jacket depicting a colorful word cloud.

If you’d prefer to read a less technical book with a more personal connection, there is Malachy McCourt’s memoir Death Need Not Be Fatal. Or you may find solace in reading Thomas Moore’s latest book offering a more philosophical approach, Ageless Soul: The Lifelong Journey Toward Meaning and Joy.

Life is a series of seasons from youth to old age, how we weather those seasons is largely up to us. As I look forward to my golden years I’m grateful for my health and the many resources available at the library to help me through them. I realize golden may look bronze or silver, but that’s OK!

#Squadgoals: Fellow Fat Girls

Every body is a real body. Let’s get that straight right away. Often I see people online describing “real bodies” as if there is only one type of body that counts. Counts for what, exactly, I’m not sure. That’s not my jam and if you clicked on this post chances are it’s not your jam either. If you’re here looking for any body-shaming, be it against fat, skinny, tall, short, or any other size-based smack talk: you have come to the wrong place. But I hope you do stick around, because I’m here to talk about some books that feature people who look like me and maybe you’ll find something that speaks to you, too.

I’m fat. There. It’s on the internet forever! I choose to use the word fat because it’s honest and a little shocking to people who are more used to euphemisms like “big” or “curvy.” Not all fat women have curves, or curves where you’d expect them.  I started out life as a skinny kid but over time I developed the trademark family hips, thighs, stomach, and double chin. Even when I drop weight these are always going to be my problem spots, as hundred-year-old family photos will attest. I can either obsess unhelpfully over how I’m shaped or I can learn to accept my lines and still work toward a goal of a healthier me. Here are the books that are inspiring me, whose photographs of bodies that look a lot like mine inspire me, and whose text give me the tools to keep pushing forward.

When it comes to loving fashion and living life for yourself I turn to books written by women who have been there, done that, and are calling me to join them in living my life at full volume. This all started with Lindy West’s Shrill: Notes from a Loud Woman, which I read in a fit of joy last summer and immediately told everyone multiple times about how much I loved it. Reading Lindy West was the first time someone was telling me that I was enough. That I not only didn’t have to justify myself or my choices to anyone, but that there is absolutely nothing wrong with my body nor how I choose to dress it. I’m not exaggerating when I say it completely changed my attitude toward myself. Shrill led me to so many great books sitting on my nightstand right now that I’m rotating between: Things No One Will Tell Fat Girls: a Handbook of Unapologetic Living by Jes Baker, Hot & Heavy: Fierce Girls on Life, Love & Fashion edited by Virgie Tovar, Fat Girl Walking: Sex, Food, Love, and Being Comfortable in Your Own Skin…Every Inch of It by Brittany Gibbons, and the very recently published Big Fit Girl: Embrace the Body You Have by Louise Green. Just reading the titles gives me goosebumps! But checking out the covers, all featuring fat girls with positive attitudes makes my heart swell. I’ve found my support group and I’m never looking back.

I’ve never been much of an athlete but lately I’ve been obsessed with the idea of doing yoga. Because my balance is worse than a newborn goat’s and I’m insecure about the potential for a gas explosion (my own) I have never sought out a yoga class. Countless friends have told me yoga will change my life, and did I want to try one of their classes? Nope! Nothing against you, you rad woman you, or your yoga class, which I’m sure is taught by a patient and knowledgeable person. But I’m only prepared to tackle this challenge from the comfort and safety of my own living room. That’s where these yoga books are going to come in very handy: Yoga Bodies: Real People, Real Stories & the Power of Transformation by Lauren Liption and Jaimie Baird, Curvy Yoga: Love Yourself & Your Body a Little More Each Day by Anna Guest-Jelley, and the library’s most recent acquisition Every Body Yoga: Let Go of Fear, Get on the Mat, Love Your Body by Jessamyn Stanley. Notice a trend? Even these very yoga-focused books also include a very healthy dollop of body acceptance and an infectious “Rawr! I can do this!” attitude.

Fat girls love themselves and have moments of insecurity just the same as women of any size have. We’re all in this together. Let’s start celebrating our differences while still finding common ground with which to bond: books!

Reading for Self-Care

I’m having a difficult time right now coping with some new realities in my life. Work is high-pressure this time of year because there is a ginormous wave of new books coming through the door every day (thanks, new book budget!). My personal life is crazy as I work on a new creative endeavor that is pushing the bounds of my sanity. I mean, how much energy do I really have after dealing with those tidal waves of books all day? Politically I am ready for action and contemplating how things may change over the next couple of years.

All this adds up to some serious stress levels and a general feeling of helplessness. What can I do to alleviate the stress and maybe turn some of this negative energy into action? As with most crises in my life, I turn to books. Here’s a list of books I’m utilizing as a form of self-care in this uncertain time.

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The Stress Test: How Pressure Can Make You Stronger by Ian Robertson
More than anything right now I really want to find a way to take negative pressures, like stress, and turn it around with a positive result. The Stress Test looks like it can do just that. Backed by over forty years of research, cognitive neuroscientist and clinical psychologist Robertson is going to teach me how to change my reaction to pressure, getting a better response that will help my overall health and well-being. I’d honestly hate to lose all stress in my life, because challenges keep me on my toes and, I think, make me a better person. Thankfully it looks like The Stress Test is a scientific approach that walks the line between too much and too little stress, which is just what I need right now.

100 Things You Can Do to Stay Fit and Healthy by Scott Douglas
It might go without saying that all this stress is adding up in a negative way. I can feel the impact it’s having on my health. That’s why I’m so looking forward to this short book. Early reviews say there are some common sense things we’ve all heard before–but I think that’s just what I need right now. Show me simple changes I can make to improve my day-to-day well-being and I’ll be set to tackle the bigger issues I care about.

The Trump Survival Guide by Gene Stone
I usually avoid talking politics on the internet because, let’s face it, as a group we humans can be overly nasty to each other online and I’m not looking for a fight. However, I don’t mind telling you how I’ve felt overwhelmed with uncertainty with the new administration and each Cabinet member’s stances on the issues that are vital to my well-being. Gene Stone’s book breaks down each issue, giving historical background, how President Obama strengthened or otherwise created change, and what President Trump is likely to do based on his history with each issue. Don’t get too bogged down in those sections, however; the best is at the end of each chapter, where Stone lists several things I can do to take action now to support each issue or cause, to strengthen it, and to give voice to the marginalized. Getting involved in national organizations, donating time to local causes, and even donating money can all help.

The Dictionary
Based on the first White House press conference, I’m certain to start keeping a dictionary by my side. I still use physical dictionaries and other reference books, as I find it easier to flip back and forth to relevant sections (especially important when trying to find the right word to embody your thoughts). But now more than ever I want to be able to define words that seem to not mean what press releases and politicians are telling me they mean. Whether or not you’re inclined to keep a giant book of words nearby, I highly recommend following Merriam-Webster on Twitter. They post a word of the day with a brief definition and often tie in these educational tweets to what’s happening in the news.

Simply Brilliant: Powerful Techniques to Unlock Your Creativity and Spark New Ideas by Bernhard Schroeder
Now more than ever I want to be creative, both in my solutions to life’s everyday problems as well as in my spare time creating something wonderful. Simply Brilliant promises to not just provide ways for me to harness my creativity, but also to explain why creativity even matters in the first place. When the going gets tough often the first thing to be eliminated is the creative, awesome thing that gives me joy. I am determined not to let this happen and I’m hoping this book will give me not just creative tactics, but the motivation to keep reminding myself, “This matters.”

The Inefficiency Assassin: Time Management Tactics for Working Smarter, Not Longer by Helene Segura
Based on the demands for my time and energies I’m definitely going to need this book to keep everything juggled and balanced–or at least as well as I can. While there are many books published each year about how you too can achieve that work-life balance, the title of this one instantly drew me in. I definitely want to kill inefficiencies! And while it may just be a book marketing tactic, I am willing to believe it. If I want to get everything done, especially going home to a massive creative project at the end of a long day at work, I’m going to need an action plan and practical ways to battle inefficiency so I can slam through necessary evils like housework and still have time to focus on my creative pursuits.

What books would you add to the list? Reading for self-care is the best decision I’ve made so far this year and hope you’ll join me in tackling our negative emotions and turning them into positive impacts.

Sarah’s Picks

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Have you checked out our Facebook page lately? If not, you now have another reason to since Sarah has been reviewing her favorite reads. In case you missed them, four are published here for your enjoyment. Go Sarah go!

Being Mortal by Atul Gawande

beingmortalcoverThe author has simple prose on a highly complex topic. As a surgeon and author, he looks at the successes of modern medicine, and how it can prolong life, and attempt to stave off the inevitable. As many Americans age, our health care system has morphed into something that wants to increase longevity, but at what expense to emotional and quality of life? Gawande illustrates the evolution of the nursing home, what their original developers intended, and how industry has taken over. What used to be assisted living in people’s own homes, with as little intervention as possible, has morphed into a complex, multi-billion dollar industry, where individual control and autonomy has been taken away. He looks at how we value our elders in this country, and what we can do to make sure our loved ones have their wishes fulfilled in the end. This is a hard look at a subject that most people want to avoid. But he gracefully documents evidence on how to make the unavoidable process of death more pleasurable. He draws on his own experience with his dying father that is both touching and sincere. A good book for anyone wanting to work on living wills or end of life conversations.

Missoula:Rape and the Justice System in a College Town by Jon Krakauer

missoulacoverThis is a tough but important read. Krakauer examined years of mishandling of rape cases at the University of Montana. Various agencies veered from the proper channels, and did not adequately prosecute the cases. The university is home to a beloved football team, and when some of its players were accused of rape, the community was split. Victims were not treated well by police, and faced public humiliation and shame, while some of the accused walked free, without the cases being properly looked into. The entire fiasco got so out of hand that the Department of Justice was brought in to investigate. Krakauer does an excellent job looking at the root causes of what went wrong, and sheds light on the victim’s predicaments, as their cases are dismissed. This book reminds us that rape happens more than we think…and the majority of cases are not reported to authorities. I admire the strength these women had, in order to testify against their attackers. I only wish the authorities had done more to make sure the criminals were prosecuted at trial. This is Krakauer’s latest installment; he’s best known for ‘Into the Wild’ and ‘Into Thin Air.’

Delicious Foods by James Hannaham

deliciousfoodscoverDelicious Foods by James Hannaham is a unique book where crack cocaine is almost a reliable narrator. The drug tells it like it is, and recaps the trials and tribulations of one of his biggest fans, Darlene. Darlene turned to crack after the murder of her activist husband, Nat. Their only child, Eddie, is left to fend for himself, as his mother becomes increasingly addicted and withdrawn. Darlene is picked up one day in a minivan, which promises her steady work and an even steadier supply of crack. Darlene is whisked away to Delicious Foods, a type of labor camp, where addicts toll and sweat away, in exchange for a constant high. Eddie is abandoned and attempts to locate his mom, and eventually ends up at Delicious as well. This book is reminiscent of the slave trade, human trafficking, and had elements of addiction, family dynamics, and greed. Difficult to digest at times, but a completely unique storyline with quite a remarkable cast of shady characters. I think this one might be seeing some awards in its future.

Barbara the Slut and Other People by Lauren Holmes

barbaracoverThis catchy title proves to be a worthy debut collection of short stories. Holmes’s voice is honest, and her tales of young relationships showcase her likeable and realistic characters. In “Pearl and the Swiss Guy Fall in Love,” a woman falls fast and madly in love. But her pet pit bull hates her new boyfriend.. As their relationship progresses, the novelty of him wears off and she finds herself increasingly irritated, while her dog warms up to his presence. “Desert Hearts” showcases a couple, recently graduated from law school living in San Francisco. The young man is hard working in a new firm, while the woman finds part-time work at a local sex toy store, and deals with the consequences from her friends and family. Barbara, in the title story, has set her sights on Princeton after high school graduation. She is able to ignore the taunts from her peers, and focuses on helping her autistic brother and her academic future. Holmes debut is fresh, relatable and easy to digest. A perfect quick read for the end of summer.

My Journey Into Yoga

Enjoy a post today from Gloria:

I began my journey into yoga a few years ago. I was overweight and due to past injuries (broken leg, repeated ankle sprains, plantar fasciitis and osteoarthritis) I wanted to get some exercise that wouldn’t pound on my joints. I wasn’t sure of the commitment I wanted to give this new fitness, so I took a class with my local school district to see if it would be a success or failure. I discovered that yoga isn’t about success, failure or competition, it is all about the journey.

Listed below are some yoga resources that you might find helpful if you head down the same path as me.

The City of Everett Parks department offers many local yoga classes. The upcoming summer classes are listed in the Everett Parks & Recreation Summer Guide on page 16.

The library has a lot of great books and DVDs for the entire family that cover many subjects relating to yoga.

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Healing Yoga: Proven Postures to Treat Twenty Common Ailments – From Backache to Bone Loss, Shoulder Pain to Bunions and More by Loren Fishman came up in my search as one of Everett Public Libraries most popular yoga books.

Everett has a naval base here in the city, and I thought the book Yoga for Warriors, Basic Training in Strength, Resilience and Peace of Mind: a System for Veterans and Military Service Men and Women by Beryl Bender Birch would be a book our local warriors might want to check out.

Blending Yoga and fiction is a fun and lighthearted way to integrate the practice with a fun story. EPL has the Downward Dog Mystery Series by Tracy Weber.

Here are two Yoga memoirs complete with descriptions from the catalog to give you an idea of what they are about:

Yoga Girl by Rachel Brathen
yogagirlPart self-help and part memoir, Yoga Girl is an inspirational, full-color look at the adventure that took writer and yoga teacher Rachel Brathen from her hometown in Sweden to the jungles of Costa Rica and finally to a paradise island in the Caribbean that she now calls home. In Yoga Girl, she gives readers an in-depth look at her journey from her self-destructive teenage years to the bohemian life she’s built through yoga and meditation in Aruba today. Featuring photos of Brathen practicing yoga in tropical locales, along with step-by-step yoga sequences and simple recipes.

yogaandbodyimageYoga and Body Image: 25 Personal Stories About Beauty, Bravery & Loving Your Body by Melanie Klein & Anna Guest-Jelley
In this remarkable, first-of-its-kind book twenty-five contributors–including musician Alanis Morissette, celebrity yoga instructor Seane Corn, and New York Times bestselling author Dr. Sara Gottfried–discuss how yoga and body image intersect. Through inspiring personal stories you’ll discover how yoga not only affects your physical health, but also how you feel about your body.

There are many great Yoga DVDs available from the library. Here are three standouts:

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Yoga Journal. Your Daily Yoga 

Family Yoga

Yoga Journal. Living Yoga

My journey into yoga continues. I joined a gym and take regular Vinyasa (flow and breath) yoga. I even ventured into a Hot/ Bikram Yoga class where the first, very structured class was like being tortured in a sweaty sauna, and yes I went back for more. I continue to be interested in different classes and broadening my yogic horizons in mind, body and spirit.

Gloria

Your New Prince or Princess

Well, the new British princess has a lovely name: Charlotte Elizabeth Diana. I wonder if the royals consulted a name book before they chose so wisely. Did you know that the library has a parenting section which includes fabulous books on names and everything baby and child related? We use it often, especially when there are questions about children’s discipline, potty training, sleeping and eating issues. There are some really excellent titles in this collection and I’d like to share them with you here.

index (2)index (3)1,107 Baby Names that Stand the Test of Time by Jennifer Griffin will help you decide upon that perfect name for your prince or princess. This is where you’ll find Charlotte, Alice, William and Edward. If you’re looking for funkier names, check out Baby Names 2013 which will give you lists of the currently popular names.

index (1)Baby Day by Day: In-depth, Daily Advice on your Baby’s Growth, Care and Development in the First Year is published by Dorling Kindersley, so you know that it’s chock full of wonderful photographs. This is your guide for taking care of baby during the first year: basic information, day by day milestones, and everything about your baby’s health. You can rest assured, it’s all here!

indexCaring For Your Baby and Young Child: Birth to Age 5 put out by the American Academy of Pediatrics has all the information you may need to safeguard your child’s health. It includes sections on safety checks, all the common diseases, feeding and nutrition, and emergencies. Parents usually go out and buy a copy of this book once they lay eyes on it, it’s that good! Come check it out from the library before you spend money on your own personal copy.

index (4)Retro Baby: Cut Back on all the Gear and Boost your Baby’s Development with more than 100 Time-tested Activities by Anne Zachry is a great one! The baby product industry would have you believe that you need loads of equipment for a baby, but, do you really? The refreshing concept here is that you are your baby’s favorite play thing and this book is full of fun, money-saving activities that will set children up for lifelong success.

index (2)Having said that, sometimes you just need that crib or high chair and, hey, it all adds up, so check out the book Baby Bargains: Secrets to Saving 20-50% on Baby Furniture, Equipment, Maternity Wear and Much Much More! by Fields. It shows you the best web sites for discounts, name brand reviews, safety tips, and seven general tips on saving money. It costs about $10,000 just to equip a baby, so use this book and pinch your pennies.

index (5)Now here’s a book that’s on my bedside table right now: 1-2-3 Magic: Effective Discipline for Children 2-12 by Thomas Phelan. It’s also one that provides immediate relief to parents searching for help with discipline. I kid you not, I’ve had moms and dads hug me when I place this book in their hands. This program works like magic and it is quick and effective. It gives you keys to controlling obnoxious behavior, encouraging good behavior, and strengthening your relationships with your children. Magic!

indexindex (1)The most popular books on toilet training are Potty Training Boys the Easy Way and Potty Training Girls the Easy Way by Fertleman. This is fascinating reading for people who have this issue, let me tell you. It’s almost potty training season (summer), so reserve your copy today!

index (6)Recipes for Play: Creative Activities for Small Hands and Big Imaginations by Sumner and Mitchener will help fill your child’s days with inspirational activities. I want to try the jiggly eggs, play dough recipe and marble painting from the indoor play section and the garden soup, fairy housing, and bubble blowing from the outdoor section. There’s also the ribbon leash, the pom-pom pusher and the wallet wonder (for long car trips). This book is pure gold for creative ideas.

index (7)One book that has to be included on this list is How to Talk So Kids Will Listen & Listen So Kids Will Talk by Faber and Mazlish. This new edition of the bestselling classic includes fresh insights and suggestions as well as the author’s time-tested methods to solve common problems and build foundations for lasting relationships, express your strong feelings without being hurtful, engage your child’s willing cooperation, set firm limits while maintaining goodwill and use alternatives to punishment that promote self-discipline.

Come on in to the library and we’ll set you up with these or other great parenting titles.

Tie on Your Big Girl Shoes and Run

Motivation

Motivation

Though it often comes as a surprise to friends, family, and even total strangers, I enjoy running. If I were ever to take on a triathlon, the organizers would politely put me in the Athena or Clydesdale category. I, on the other hand, embrace the term fathlete. As you’ve seen from previous posts, I like to eat, but I like being active just as much. While these two things don’t seem to be at odds to me and others I’ve met with similar habits, some ‘healthier’ people can have a hard time not judging a book by its cover. An example: I recently had a yoga instructor at a retreat ask me if I did any physical activity at all when I told her I rarely practiced yoga. Her reaction when I told her I played ice hockey a couple times a week and was training for my third half marathon was worth the sting of her initial derision. Namaste.

This kind of ‘fitter than thou’ attitude is pretty prevalent in fitness literature. For folks like me, it’s hard to find resources that encourage a healthy lifestyle and at the same time don’t tell you how horrible it is to be in your body. So, to throw a bone to all my larger-than-life-fitties out there, I’ve compiled a list of non-judgmental helpful books to help you reach your goals.

Unapologetic Fat Girl's Guide to Exercise coverThe Unapologetic Fat Girl’s Guide to Exercise by Hanne Blank is a body-positive manifesto. Though the early chapters are aimed at motivating individuals who aren’t currently active, there are some nuggets of wisdom that everyone could use. I especially like her points on intent. Many people are active out of a vague sense of guilt that they should be doing something to improve themselves. Blank urges readers to move because they genuinely enjoy the activity, not because they feel it’s expected of them. There’s loads of other info in here about choosing the right activities, partnering up for success, selecting the best gear for your needs, and more.

The Runner’s Field Manual: A Tactical (and Practical) Survival Guide by Mark Remy is a great place to start if you’re interested in getting into running. This guide gives you advice on everything from knowing proper path etiquette, to how to run up an incline, to the proper way to run past roadkill without gagging. I appreciate that the authors and editors took the time to mix useful advice with a heavy dose of humor. The only thing that was lacking was information about proper nutrition while training – thankfully there were two other books ready to swoop in and answer all my questions.

Nutrient Timing for Peak Performance coverSomewhere in the back of my head there is a vague awareness that what you eat and when you eat it has a major impact on performance and progress. My lack of clarity on this topic probably explains why I actually gained weight while training for my last half marathon  instead of slimming down (here’s a hint: it wasn’t muscle building – it was the large pizzas I’d crave after training runs). Sports Nutrition for Endurance Athletes is a moderately-technical book that gets into the different nutrients found in foods, which ones you need to aid your performance and recovery, and what foods would be the best ones to consume. Nutrient Timing for Peak Performance takes things a step further and helps you figure out how much of what foods you need to consume before, during, and after different activities. My apologies upfront to anyone who dreads math – to use this book you’re going to have to crunch some numbers to figure out what plans are best for your build. I also appreciate the helpful meal plan examples at the end of the book to make things even easier.

Here’s a bonus book for those of you who are gluten-free and head-scratching at all these carb-heavy meal plans. The Gluten-Free Edge provides alternatives to the usual pre-event pasta dinners to help you on your way. Readers are also treated to a whole chapter of gluten-free recipes at the end to help put in practice all that you learn.

Healthy Tipping Point coverLastly, if you’re just looking to make some lifestyle changes to add more activity and a better sense of well-being to your life, Healthy Tipping Point has some really useful tips. While the main purpose of the book is to get the reader to make healthier choices for his or her own good, the author urges them to accept that thin and lean may not be the healthiest body type for each individual. More emphasis is placed on finding each individual’s healthy weight and physique, rather than trying to shoehorn people into the current popular perception of health and beauty.