Mind Your Ps & Qs

Is there a little bit of a grumpy old man or woman in you? You know the type. A person prone to saying things like: “In my day we were polite”, “Does no one know how to write a sentence anymore?”, “I would have gotten away with it too if it weren’t for you meddling kids” (o.k. that one is from Scooby Doo, but you get the idea). If your inner grumpy person thinks things like proper etiquette, good grammar and an appreciation for an obscure typeface are a thing of the past, you are in for a surprise. There are actually a large number of new(ish) books that advocate for an appreciation of just these things. Clearly ‘kids today’ are going retro, with a new twist on things, of course. Don’t believe me? Take a gander at these tomes, all available at EPL.

You could be forgiven for thinking that concern about how to ‘act properly’ was reserved for state dinners, debutante dances and the filming of Downton Abbey. Etiquette, however, is making a surprising comeback with new takes on old manners.


Emily Post’s Etiquette: Manners for a New World
This classic etiquette tome has been adapted for the modern age with advice on texting, tweeting, whether to cover up your tattoo for an interview, and advice on the ever elusive work dress code. If you find yourself walking down the aisle, there is also a new edition of Emily Post’s Wedding Etiquette to shield you from making a dreaded faux pas.

Good Manners for Nice People Who Sometimes Say F*ck by Amy Alkon
Realizing that worrying about which fork to use is not high on many people’s priority list, the author instead addresses many of the conundrums that we currently face: When do you actually phone someone instead of texting or emailing? How do you tactfully tell the person in line to put their cellphone off speaker? And of course, when to friend and unfriend on Facebook.

Works Well with Others by Ross McCammon
This is a guide to successfully navigating workplace etiquette from a unique perspective: Those who feel ill at ease in the workplace to begin with. Drawing on his own experiences, the author gives helpful guidance on key work etiquette issues such as proper eye contact, when to interrupt and how to make successful small talk.

The idea of standard proper grammar is definitely alive and well and if you simply want to correct people, we have several traditional guides that will give you all the ammunition you need. If you want to delve a little deeper though, take a look at these more forgiving takes on grammar and its purpose.


You’re Saying it Wrong: A Pronunciation Guide to the 150 Most Commonly Mispronounced Words and Their Tangled Histories of Misuse by Ross & Kathryn Petras
From ‘buck naked’ to ‘Uranus’ the authors not only let you know the correct pronunciation of each word or phrase, but they also give a fascinating backstory and context to its use. In addition, there are several funny and useful chapters on faking it like “How to Sound Philosophical” and “How to Sound Like a Fashionista” that can always come in handy.

Accidence Will Happen: A Recovering Pendant’s Guide to English Language and Style by Oliver Kamm
Once a grammar purist, the author persuasively argues that English is a language largely learned by instinct, ever-changing, and not confined to a set of absolutist rules. He cleverly proves his point in the second half of the book with an A to Z guide of ‘Usage Conundrums.’

Founding Grammars: How Early America’s War Over Words Shaped Today’s Language by Rosemarie Ostler
If you really want to get into the nitty-gritty of why we speak as we do in the United States, then this is the book for you. From the revolutionary war to the present, the author chronicles the constant tension between ‘proper’ and ‘common’ English usage in the United States and how that usage is used to define individuals and groups.

Now that you know how to behave and speak properly, it is time to consider the letters you use to express yourself. While it might be surprising to some, there are actually a dedicated number of aficionados who enjoy exploring different typographies. Here at the library we have the books to please them.


The Evolution of Type by Tony Seddon
Type historian, yes there is such a thing, Seddon examines 100 significant typefaces from Gutenberg all the way up to the latest digital typefaces. Each typeface gets a detailed history including its origins and the new features it introduced. Lots of helpful illustrations and definitions are included to encourage those new to the subject.

Typography: the Annual of the Type Directors Club
Jam packed with examples from books, magazines, logos, posters, web graphics and pretty much anything that is written on, this book presents the winning designs from the Type Directors Club annual competition which seeks out the best graphic design work in a given year. Even if graphic design and typography isn’t your thing, this is a beautiful book to browse through and enjoy.

Grafica della Strada: the Signs of Italy by Louise Fili
Another beautiful book in and of itself, this work brings together the author’s three decade-long project of photographing the unique and stylish signs of Italy. Whether made from stone tiles or gleaming chrome, the signs, advertising everything from restaurants to the way to the bathroom, are mesmerizing and a reflection of the many stylistic changes in the country itself.

So clearly, there is no reason to repress your inner grumpus. Everything old is new again when it comes to minding your Ps and Qs.

Reading Trendy: Collected Biographies of Women

Hypercolor T-shirts. Scrunchies. Slap bracelets. Spandex bodysuits. Mood rings. Tight-rolled acid-wash jeans. Trends come and go, and not just in the fashion world. The literary world has its fair share of trends as well. Right now we’re experiencing one I can only call wondrous, as collected biographies of trailblazing women are gracing our shelves and checking out at the speed of light. Without further ado I am pleased to introduce you to some rad women.


Fight Like a Girl: 50 Feminists Who Changed the World by Laura Barcella
Even if it might not have seemed like it at the time, these women have helped repave the path for women in the world, whether they be gay, straight, political, artistic, or the first woman in space (looking at you, Sally Ride). Each biography contains the basics, like birth/death years and a brief overview of her life. But we get to dive in even deeper with personal quotes, notes on each woman’s legacy, and illustrations. This book is aimed at teens, which is great so that kids today have some positive role models outside the Kardashian family. I would have loved a book like this when I was growing up. But don’t let the targeted age group sway you: this book is still entertaining and empowering enough for adults too.

Headstrong: 52 Women Who Changed Science–and the World by Rachel Swaby
This was the book that started it all. I’d owned a copy for nearly a year before I finally started reading it this summer. Friends, I tell you I learned more useful information reading Headstrong than I think I did in all of high school. Sorry Mrs. Klaus, it’s true! You’ve probably heard that silver screen legend Hedy Lamarr was an inventor whose radio guidance system helped lay the groundwork for wifi and Bluetooth. But have you heard of Lise Meitner (nuclear fission), Marie Tharp (created the first scientific map of the ocean floor), or Marguerite Perey (discovered the element francium)? What about Alice Ball? She was from Seattle and developed a groundbreaking treatment for leprosy. This book is designed so that you could read one chapter each week and end up with a year of scientific geniuses dancing through your subconscious.

Remarkable Minds: 17 More Pioneering Women in Science & Medicine by Pendred E. Noyce
Sad but true: this book looks like a textbook and that could let it slip under your radar. But what it lacks in outward appearance it makes up for in substance. Each chapter focuses on a different woman, but it goes deep into her life providing photos (or paintings, if our lady lived pre-photography), diagrams relating to her field of work, and a timeline of major world events alongside her personal achievements to give everything context. Out of all the books mentioned here, this is by far the most detailed.


Women in Science: 50 Fearless Pioneers Who Changed the World by Rachel Ignotofsky
This book is beyond gorgeous. It’s truly a work of art and author/illustrator Rachel Ignotofsky clearly has immense talent. We all judge books by their covers even if we try not to. There’s something so appealing about a colorful, intricately decorated book that makes me sit up and take notice and I know I’m not the only one. So if your goal is to get kids interested in a book about women scientists, this is absolutely the way to do it. Even the endpapers are breathtaking! Since it’s aimed at children the passages are brief and more of a general overview of each woman, but wow, what design! Definitely don’t miss this one.

Wonder Women: 25 Innovators, Inventors, and Trailblazers Who Changed History by Sam Maggs
The beloved (at least by me!) author of The Fangirl’s Guide to the Galaxy is back with something completely different. Here Sam Maggs introduces us to the rad ladies of science that history sometimes has a tendency to overlook. I can’t say too much about this since it’s a book we still have on order. It was originally set to publish mid-October but the publishers have since moved it up to…this past Tuesday! Once our copies are in you can believe they will be flying off the shelves faster than you can say STEM!

It’s reassuring to realize that when you check out one of these books you’re only going to have to read one book, but you’ll read dozens of biographies of some truly incredible women. This is one trend I hope never ends.

Quick Picks!

c1d4eb0de14c5411ecece51e6819d96eDid you know that we have a browsing section of books at the Everett Public Library that consists of newly published trade and mass market paperbacks? They are called “Quick Picks” and you can find great titles that are almost always available because no one can place holds on these books. Think of it: Brand new hot paperback titles, yours for the taking. This is your chance to get those hardbound bestsellers that are just out in paper. Here are a few that I have eyed lately.

index-3Look closely at the photo above.  I just spied a book which is on the current paperback non-fiction bestsellers list. Do you see it? S P Q R by Mary Beard is a history of Rome with passion and without technical jargon. It’s history written with common sense, a point of view and a healthy level of snark just to keep things interesting. So this is how perusing the Quick Picks works. You find books that you didn’t even know you needed!


51ab-hiwhml-_sx336_bo1204203200_I recently found a stunner of a book, Isabella the Warrior Queen.  Kristin Downey takes the Spanish Queen out from behind the shadow of Ferdinand and illuminates her importance in the history of the world. As Queen, she took effective measures against the Muslim threat to western civilization, had the vision to support Columbus’ venture and set the stage for the Spanish/Hapsburg empire building in Europe and the Americas. Oh, yes. And she started the Inquisition. Oops!  Nonetheless, this is an amazing story of a remarkable woman that reads like a novel. I highly recommend it!

indexThere’s a great selection of non-fiction in the Quick Picks section. Julie, a co-worker, recommended Pogue’s Basics: Life; Essential Tips and Shortcuts (That No One Bothers to Tell You). It’s a great ‘nibbler’ book and by that I mean you can open it up anywhere and read a bit. There’s useful information like how to remember how to set the utensils on your table: it’s alphabetical, fork, knife, spoon from the left. Also, fork and left both have four letters while knife, spoon and right have five letters. See? You gotta read this one!

index-1Welcome to Subirdia by John M Marzluff is also available as a Quick Pick. There are always overflow crowds when this University of Washington professor lectures at EPL. Avoid the crowds and get this author all to yourself with this book about how birds have adapted and survived in urban areas. In this fascinating and optimistic work, Marzluff tells how our own actions affect the birds and animals that live in our cities and towns, and he provides ten specific strategies everyone can use to make human environments friendlier for our natural neighbors.

index-2I just grabbed a copy of The Shell Collector which is a collection of exquisitely crafted short stories by the author of the acclaimed Pulitzer Prize-winning #1 New York Times bestseller All The Light We Cannot See, Anthony Doerr. This is a wonderful collection of longish short stories. The loose theme that weaves them together is water, the sea, love of nature, and finding your place in life, even if it means severing ties with those you love. Check it out if only to read the title story. And to gaze at the cover. Beautiful.

index-1Did you miss Paula McLain’s Circling the Sun when it was popular as a hardbound book? Read the Quick Pick! This novel by Beryl Markham transports you to 1920’s Kenya and the world of Out of Africa. This is historical fiction that is beautifully written, historically accurate, and utterly engrossing. I highly recommend this book to anyone who likes strong female figures and/or has an interest in 20th century colonial Africa. This is one great read.


index-2Who can resist the idea of a book barge on the Seine in Paris where the bookseller, Jean Perdu, uses his intuition to select just the right book to deal with whichever emotion – small or large – is afflicting you? Nina George writes a charming, wise and winsome novel in The Little Paris Bookshop. We go on a journey with Perdu to the South of France as he moves from being lost in grief to slowly reclaiming himself and his life. The further south we go, the warmer the weather and the more Perdu comes alive. Bookseller. Lost love. The wisdom of books. All combine to make an enchanting read. Don’t miss it.

So remember to check out our Quick Picks collections at both locations. Browse a selection of mystery, romance, and notable bestsellers. Don’t waste your money on books when you can borrow them from your library. Quick! Pick a book!

We Remember: September 11, 2001

World Trade Center September 11, 2001

Photo by Kate Larsen.

This Sunday marks 15 years since the horrific September 11th attacks back in 2001. Four coordinated attacks killed nearly three thousand people and injured twice as many. I had the realization the other day that there is a whole new generation of kids and teens out there who didn’t live through that terrible time, who didn’t know a life before. At least in my mind, there’s definitely a Before and an After. So I wanted to get people to talk about where they were and what happened.

I lived in central Illinois at the time. I had saved up and taken a year off from regular life to go live in sin with my husband Chris, who was my fiance in those days. Chris was at the bank with one of our roommates, paying the rent. This was the one week in my life I worked retail. I was scheduled to start training on the cash register that day, and as I was getting dressed I had the TV on. I remember seeing the footage of the first plane hit, and then the second. I was glued to my TV for as long as I could manage before I knew I had to get in the car and drive to work. I don’t remember anything about that day at work. The numbness set in the longer I thought about the magnitude of what I had witnessed. After I got home from work I heard that the police showed up at one of the research institutions on campus, checking things out because they thought it could be a potential target as well. You could see the building, just three blocks away, outside my bedroom window on the 4th floor. The rest of the year I slept uneasily thinking that we could be next.

I know a lot of people have a similar story: I was getting ready for work and I learned what had happened. But I knew there would be variations, and entirely different stories altogether. So I gathered some EPL staffers together and asked them to share the stories of where they were that fateful day. I would love it if you would consider sharing your story in the comments. We remember. We will always remember.

It began like any other day…. I got up and got my two kids off to school. My big goal of the day was canning my pickled garlic, and I had all my supplies ready – the brine, the jars, my canner, etc.  It is an all day job boiling each small batch of jars. About 10:30 I turned on the TV, just for some back ground noise in between batches, and I remember turning it on and the first image was a replay of the plane flying into the tower! My first thought was it was some kind of a weird disaster show… but then I realized it was real! My mind couldn’t register that it had happened! I think I was in shock along with the rest of the world for days.

I was in transition, moving from Boston to Chicago, but between homes, couch surfing with a variety of friends in states throughout the Midwest. When I woke that morning, after a particularly bad night’s sleep – no couch this time, just hardwood floor – I was in Bloomington, Indiana and I know this is cliché, but I thought I was still dreaming. Since that was my main concern, I was dreaming about the road trip, its ins and outs, adventures to come, and so forth. After I found out my brother, who lives in Brooklyn, and worked in Wall Street at that time was OK, I spent the next day, wandering the streets of this lovely college town as depressed and devastated as everyone else. It was only later I got word from friends and family back East that for example, Brian, a boy I remember coloring with in upstate New York had lost his life in one of the towers. There isn’t a day I don’t think about 9/11.

I was in 4th grade on September 11th, and the teacher was reading us our daily chapter from whichever book we were working through that month.  I remember being really into the story and was very annoyed when the school principal came in, pulled our teacher aside and whispered something to her.  After the principal left, our teacher turned to the class and told us something to the effect of “the Twin Towers have been attacked”, even though to a class of fourth graders the significance was likely lost.  I remember thinking that I didn’t know what that was and that we should get back to reading the story.  It wasn’t until I got home and my mother had the news story on and I saw the repeated footage of people crying, the smoke, and the collapsing towers that it really sunk in what had happened that day and how serious it was.

A personal memory for me regarding September 11, 2001 actually happened two months later. A family friend passed away and in explaining to my nephew who had recently turned four that this person had died he asked “Did a plane hit her house?” It brought home to me how even the youngest children realized something devastating had happened to the country and now fear was part of their lives.

The morning of Sept 11, 2001, I had a late start time at work.  I kept hitting my snooze alarm, which was tuned to an NPR station. I heard fragments of news, “plane crash….,” “…..Pentagon,” “…..terrorism.”  I didn’t put all the bits together until my husband called from his office to ask if I could tell him what was going on. Rumors at his workplace were flying but no one seemed to have the full picture.

I headed to the TV room and turned on the news, and was shocked to see not one, but three buildings had been hit by hijacked planes; a suspected act of terrorism. I called my husband back: “It’s bad. It’s really, really bad.”  I took the quickest shower I could, threw on some clothes and hurried to my job at the Lake City Branch Library.

When I arrived, library staff were halfheartedly preparing to open the library, sniffling and clutching wads of Kleenex. By then, we’d learned about the fourth plane. We formed a circle, held hands, hugged, and talked for a bit, holding each other up. I encouraged staff to take turns stepping away from the library for a little while, to visit their church or place of worship, or simply go hug their families. Whatever their conscience was urging them to do.

Later, one of my co-workers made a tiny, black heart sticker to wear on my Seattle Public Library nametag. She thanked me for “being a sweetheart” on that tragic morning. I no longer work at the Seattle Public Library, but I still have that nametag with the black heart; it’s my souvenir from 9-11.

World Trade Center September 11, 2001

Photo by Kate Larsen.

I was working at the Columbus branch of the New York Public Library that day and we were getting things ready to open. The daily newspapers hadn’t been delivered (again!), so I went to the corner bodega to pick them up and soon realized something was very wrong. Everyone in the shop was intently listening to the radio and wondering aloud how a pilot could have possibly run into the World Trade Center on such a clear day. When I got back to the branch we began listening to the radio as well, we didn’t have a television, and that is how we learned of the horrible events as they unfolded.

While there was definitely a feeling of shock, confusion and horror at what was happening, the dominant concern at the time was oddly practical and personal for most of us listening: Where were the people we cared about and how the heck were we going to get home with the subway and most of the buses not running? I was technically in charge at the branch, due to a staff illness, so I had to confirm that the library would be closed that day, which took a surprisingly long time to do, and close up the branch so staff could find their loved ones and try to get home safely.

My wife was working in Midtown, in the shadow of the Empire State Building which made us both very nervous that day, and thankfully we were able to find each other and join the large stream of people for the long walk home together. We were lucky, in a way, since we didn’t have to cross any of the bridges to get home, but we did have to walk all the way to 188th street in Washington Heights, a distance of seven miles, where we were living at the time. Once home, with my mother-in-law who was on her first visit to New York no less, we were finally able to get out of survival mode and slowly take in the events of the day.

I had just moved from the East Village in Manhattan to Greenpoint, Brooklyn when 9/11 happened. I’d lived in New York for just over a year, and on Monday, September 10, had just come back into the City from a long weekend in the Catskills. I remember commenting on the drive back as we passed the World Trade Center that I hadn’t made it there yet (save for the subway stop) and that I probably should make a point to go to the viewing platform.

I’d also taken Tuesday, September 11th off of work to do some errands so I was not at my library in Manhattan that day – but if things had gone as planned I would’ve been only 12 blocks from the World Trade Center, or worse, on the subway running underneath it around the time the first plane hit. However, I was running late.

My husband went out to walk our dog and he rushed back in saying, “You have to come see this. This is crazy!” From the roof of our apartment building in Brooklyn we had a perfect view of downtown New York, so we went up; a few people from our building were already there. At that point both buildings were still standing. (I had my point-and-shoot film camera and snapped a few photos.)

I’ll never forget a French woman who was on the roof with us, cynically commenting about how stupid it was that not one, but two planes had somehow managed to fly into a building – “how could the pilots be so stupid?” she said. It was at that moment that I realized it had to be terrorism.

Both my husband and I were able to call our families and tell them we were okay before the phone lines went out. Then we sat down in front of the TV, and within moments of sitting down we watched first tower fall. We stayed in that same spot, stunned, all day and late into the night. The phone lines and cable quickly went out. You have to understand, this event wiped out services miles away from the World Trade Center site. Of course, in lower Manhattan things were much worse.

The cable company was able to reroute service back through the Empire State Building (where it’d been before the WTC was built), so thankfully we were able to get exactly one TV channel: NY1, the local 24-hour news station. And that was the only channel we had for a very long time – it may have even been months, I can’t remember now – not that having only one channel was important. It took a long time before we would’ve felt okay about changing the channel, or really doing anything other than watching the local news when we weren’t working. Things were very subdued.

On September 12th most of the NYPL branches were closed because transportation became difficult and staff just couldn’t get to them. But, the Library was justifiably proud to be able to open some branches, offering refuge and a place for people to just gather and be together and try to process what happened, and what was going to happen. Libraries have always supported their communities in important ways, but this was an event that showed the true power of libraries. Public libraries in New York became critical lifelines.

In the months that followed we watched as the City changed around us. Too many things happened to list them here– like the regular presence of armed National Guard soldiers at subway stops (imagine if armed guards were at every major intersection you drive through) to the peculiar odor that remained for months in lower Manhattan – but daily life changed drastically, and remained changed for years.

Talking to Strangers (About Books) Part 2

Greetings, intrepid readers! In my last post I talked about all the amazing things happening for bookworms on social media. I highlighted three different platforms (Goodreads, Instagram, and Litsy) and detailed the top 5 types of conversations you’re likely to have among fellow readers on those apps. Today I’m going to review some of the stellar books I’ve read as a result of these conversations with strangers. All of these books were outside of my typical fluffy/frivolous reading repertoire and I never would have picked them up had I not seen in-depth reviews and quotes from readers on bookish social media. I should add these are listed in the order I read them. And some of these were partially reviewed in my post last month about the 24 in 48 Readathon.

rupi kaur milk and honey by carol on litsy
Milk & Honey by Rupi Kaur
It seemed like everyone who hadn’t read this book when it came out late last year was picking it up for the first time in April for National Poetry Month. I typically don’t read much poetry but I made an exception for this title. In her first book of poetry, Rupi Kaur takes us deep into her life with extremely personal poems about her childhood, past boyfriends, and learning to heal after trauma and breakups. It’s a quick read, but one that is extremely frank and open about what she’s gone through in her life. Even with all of the personal details, most women will find themselves somewhere in this book. I do love how it ends on an uplifting note, as if to say this too shall pass and I am stronger now for having gone through all of this. I also like the “everywoman” appeal of the poems as they invite each woman to look back on her relationships, her period, how she got through extremely trying times and came through stronger, though hurting.

lindy west shrill by carol on litsy
Shrill: Notes From a Loud Woman by Lindy West
I am apparently the only person who had not heard of Lindy West before this book, and even so I got to it too late to see her at a reading in Seattle as she was traveling around the country on her book tour this spring. I regret not having her on my radar until now, but I have been forever changed by reading her book Shrill. Not only does Lindy tackle major topics like feminism, abortion, and rape culture, she is the number one poster child for squashing fat-shaming and having positive body acceptance. During her book I found myself questioning my own attitude towards my body, and asking myself why I let others’ opinions of what they think I should wear and what they think is appropriate or not for my body type affect what I purchase and what I wear. The day after finishing Shrill I wore a dressy pair of shorts to work. People saw my knees and I didn’t die!

roxane gay bad feminist by carol on litsy
Bad Feminist by Roxane Gay
Reading Roxane Gay is a lot like talking with your most level-headed friend. Even if the subject matter is one that evokes strong feelings, she keeps her cool and tries to discuss these important things with you in a calm, clear manner. In Bad Feminist Roxane Gay manages to cover everything from pop culture to rape to feminism to a career in academia. She doesn’t talk down to us, but rather goes out of her way to lay out the inequalities, the injustices, the annoyances, and the facts in a matter-of-fact and yet empathetic way. There is a definite juxtaposition of mixing very serious topics with lighter ones. I was extremely fascinated reading about her time as a competitive Scrabble player. First of all, I didn’t even know that such a thing existed. But I realize that to do anything competitively there is a suggestion that your skills stand above the average person. To play Scrabble competitively implies an intellect and strength of character that few posses. Such is the case with Roxane Gay. She is smart. She is funny. She is working on a book called Hunger that I can’t wait to get my hands on, and I get the feeling I will always react with grabby hands when someone mentions a new release by her.

claudia rankine citzen an american lyric by carol on litsy
Citizen: an American Lyric by Claudia Rankine
Every time something horrible, unjust, and tragic happens in this world, the bookish social media clusters swarm together in shared empathy, seeking understanding  to try and make sense of the senseless. Such was the case with Citizen. I want to live in a world where this book isn’t necessary–but the sad and disgusting truth is this book is very much-needed. There are many put-yourself-in-this-situation passages that are written in the second person. The use of the second person is clever and intentional in a book that tries to expose life in a racist country. Because as much as we would like to think we have evolved past racism, bigotry, and inequality, we have not. As a country, we still have so far to go it’s heartbreaking. But that’s why books like this are here for you, and why I recommend everyone read it. Everyone. Bookish social media declared this required reading for every American citizen and I wholeheartedly agree.

rebecca solnit men explain things to me by carol on litsy
Men Explain Things to Me by Rebecca Solnit
Once again my bookish social media connections raved about a book, calling it necessary reading, and once again I picked up the gauntlet. And while this book isn’t just about mansplaining–a term the author has mixed feelings about–it definitely is about the disenfranchised and the cultural missteps that need to be corrected if we are ever going to improve our communities.The passages that really stood out to me involved having a voice and being heard. Historically it has been disgustingly easy for the group in power to silence anyone else whose opinions, thoughts, feelings, or civil liberties would infringe upon the leading group’s power. But the more that people band together to share one voice–civil rights, women’s suffrage, feminism, exposing racism in one’s community–the harder it is to ignore the message.

These relatively short books packed a mighty literary punch. While I wouldn’t have sought them out on my own, I am so glad my bookish comrades urged me on. Not only was I reading out of my fluffy comfort zone, I was seeing the world through some very different perspectives. You’ll notice these books were strong on themes of racism and sexism, feminist to the core. I’m currently falling down a rabbit hole of such, with book recommendations based on these books spiraling out from my TBR pile.

More books that bookish social media has recommended to me that deal with race and racism include Homegoing by Yaa Gyasi, Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates, and Freedom is a Constant Struggle: Ferguson, Palestine, and the Foundations of a Movement by Angela Davis.

More books that bookish social media has recommended to me that deal with sexism and feminism include Everyday Sexism by Laura Bates, Sex Object by Jessica Valenti, and He’s a Stud, She’s a Slug and 49 Other Double Standards Every Woman Should Know also by Jessica Valenti.

Hopefully you’ve not only gained some new titles to add to your TBR pile but also seen what good can come from social media. I’ve rarely encountered a troll on Goodreads, Litsy, or the #bookstagram portion of Instagram. It’s kind of like a book nerd’s utopia. We’re definitely living in the golden age of reading. Seize the day and your smartphone and join the reading revolution!

Eating History

If you want to live, you gotta eat. A pretty basic truth and one we tend to take for granted. While gourmands argue about what wine to pair with what fish and health gurus debate the merits of protein vs carbs, a lot of the interesting questions about food go unanswered: Why do we eat what we eat? Why do certain peoples and regions eat different things? What the heck is a ‘square meal’ and where did it come from? Luckily, if you want to find answers to these questions and more, the Everett Public Library is the place to be. There are actually a large number of works on the history of food and eating that are fascinating and help you appreciate this seemingly basic human need. Read on for a few choice examples.


A History of Food in 100 Recipes by William Sitwell
Taking a pleasingly micro approach to the history of food, Sitwell lays out a fascinating chronology, based on actual recipes, that demonstrates the evolution of food preparation and our eating habits. Everything from Ancient Egyptian bread (1958-1913 BCE), Dried Fish (800 AD), Soufflé (1816) and Rice Krispies Treats (1941) are covered. Far from just a collection of eccentric dishes, however, this work is full of interesting insights into why and what we eat.

Consider the Fork: a History of How We Cook and Eat by Bee Wilson
Instead of focusing on the food itself, this work tracks the history of cooking through the technologies used to create the dishes we eat. While we tend to take for granted many seemingly simple kitchen implements (like the knife, the rice cooker and the egg timer) Wilson describes the surprisingly complicated and significant histories behind them.

Sweet Invention: a History of Dessert by Michael Krondl
Whether you believe dessert is the last part of a meal or a meal in itself, this book will prove entertaining and informative reading. Part history and part travelogue, Krondl travels the globe talking with confectioners and examining the dessert traditions of different cultures and countries and how they evolved over time.

British Food: An Extraordinary Thousand Years of History by Colin Spencer
One of the most vilified cuisines deserves an extraordinary and entertaining history; Spencer does not disappoint in this engaging work. The ups, yes there were ups, and downs of Britain’s food reputation are lovingly cataloged. Interestingly, the author charts the most recent downturn to the Victorian period when raw food was frowned upon and every foodstuff imaginable was boiled.


Three Squares: The Invention of the American Meal by Abigail Carroll
More than a history of breakfast, lunch, and dinner in America, Carroll traces the evolution of eating habits in the United States from the colonial era to the present day. As with much U.S. history, the one constant appears to be change itself. The biggest change turns out to be the industrial revolution and its regularization of the workday, leaving dinner as the only time available for a proper sit down meal with the family.

Mastering the Art of Soviet Cooking: A Memoir of Love and Longing by Anya Von Bremzen
A fascinating memoir and history told through classic Soviet dishes. The author was raised in a communal apartment with 18 other people and one kitchen before immigrating to the United States with her mother in the 1970s. Now the author of several international cookbooks, this is the tale of her upbringing and the food so closely associated with it.

Rice, Noodle, Fish: Deep Travels Through Japan’s Food Culture by Matt Goulding
Part travel guide and part food history, this book explores the deep and complicated food culture of Japan. Goulding travels throughout the country visiting the many different restaurants (including ramen, tempura, soba and sushi shops) exploring the food and history of each. The author is also not shy about giving recommendations of which restaurants to go to and which to avoid.

Dining with the Famous and Infamous by Fiona Ross
Taking food history to a personal level, Ross sets out to discover the eating habits of many interesting contemporary and historical figures. From George Orwell to Marilyn Monroe, the individual eating habits of the great and no so great are explored. This collection of food voyeurism is a guilty pleasure but impossible to ignore.

I hope you have enjoyed this small sampling of the many great works available on food, dinning and their history here at the library. Reading might actually burn calories so no need to worry about overindulgence.

Summer Reading, Having a Blast!

Book and StonesI’ve signed up for the Adult Summer Reading Program at the Everett Public Library and I’m super happy about my reading stack this summer. I’ve only read three so far, but I’m excited to get some time to read and also to share the whole pile with you. Here goes!

indexIf you’re pining for the old days when you could ride your pony to the candy store, I recommend Elizabeth Lett’s book The Eighty-Dollar Champion: Snowman, the Horse that Inspired a Nation. This book tells the dramatic odyssey of a horse called Snowman, saved from the slaughterhouse by a young Dutch farmer named Harry. Harry and Snowman went on to become America’s show-jumping champions, winning first prize in Madison Square Garden. Set in the mid-to late-1950s, this book also includes a fair amount of history of the horse. I dare you not to cry when Snowy dies.

indexUnder the Wide and Starry Sky is the fictionalized account of the relationship of Scottish writer Robert Louis Stevenson and his spunky, older American wife Fanny. It is beautifully written and meticulously researched. This novel met all of my criteria for good historical fiction: believable characters, atmospheric setting, and it leaves you wanting to know even more about the people, places, and events. Besides, the boat that they adventured in is right here on the waterfront in Everett.

index (3)Shadows in the Vineyard: the True Plot to Poison the World’s Greatest Wine is by Maximillien Potter. On the surface, it is a true story of an extortion plot against the world’s greatest vineyard, a tiny patch of land in Burgundy, France which grows the universally acclaimed best wine in the world. But it’s also the story of the family that grows the wine: the generations that have owned and run the vineyard, treating the vines like their own children, back to when they bought it after the French Revolution. Cheers!

index (1)A Hero of France: A Novel by Alan Furst is set in Paris,1941. Mathieu leads a small group of Resistance fighters. They help British airmen stranded in occupied France to make their way to Spain and then return to England. It’s dangerous work. Mathieu has to rely on his instincts to know who he can trust. He also needs to build a network of people he can rely on and be able to rapidly improvise when things don’t go according to plan (which is pretty much all the time). Meanwhile, a top German detective has arrived in Paris tasked with identifying and arresting members of the Resistance.

index (2)Seinfeldia: How a Show about Nothing Changed Everything by Jennifer Armstrong is about nothing and everything. If you are a Seinfeld fan this is a MUST READ! It goes in depth on the genesis of Seinfeld from its main characters, the writers and the real-life situations that inspired most of the insane plot lines. It follows the show from it’s inception to finale, including the “reunion” on Curb Your Enthusiasm as well as the effect that Seinfeld has on pop culture even to this day.

index (3)I am listening to Here’s To Us by Elin Hildebrand and it looks like the perfect summer read, doesn’t it? Deacon Thorpe was a famous bad boy chef. When he dies at his Nantucket house, his agent calls his three ex-wives together to the house to say goodbye. The story is told by several characters and switches from the present to the past. Secrets are revealed and at the end the family learns to forgive. This is a quick read with some interesting characters.

index (5)I’m also listening to The National Parks: America’s Best Idea by Ken Burns because we recently drove down to Rainier. Burns and Dayton Duncan delve into the history of the park idea, from the first sighting by white men in 1851 of the valley that would become Yosemite and the creation of the world’s first national park at Yellowstone in 1872, to the most recent additions to a system that now encompasses nearly four hundred sites and 84 million acres. There’s a lot of history and adventure here to be enjoyed. Going to Glacier? Grab these CD’s for the car ride.

index (6)Everyone Brave is Forgiven is by Chris Cleave, the best-selling author of Little Bee.  The plot centers on three Londoners (Mary, Thomas and Alistair) and how the war orchestrates the choices they make. The story is loosely based on love letters between the author’s grandparents. The beauty of this book is not so much the plot, but how the story is told with beautiful prose, cleverly placed humor, and a quiet urgency. It would make a good book club book.

index (4)And lastly, a co-worker suggested Girl Waits With Gun by Amy Stewart the gal who wrote The Drunken Botanist. It is a novel based on the forgotten true story of one of the nation’s first female deputy sheriffs. Apparently it’s “really good”, so good, in fact, that there will be a sequel titled Lady Cop Makes Trouble. I haven’t actually gotten my hands on this one, but will have to wait. Without a gun.

Well, gotta go. I hear a hammock calling my name. What’s on your reading list this summer? Come on down to the library and check out these and other great summer reads. See you there!