eBooks for Kids

Carnivores, animals that eat flesh, seem like an unusual subject for funny children’s books. But there are so many good books out there with this theme! In the following list we go from picture books letting you know it’s not a good idea to eat your classmates, to a beginning-reader chapter book about four carnivores trying to fix their “bad-rap” reputation, to non-fiction titles about some fierce (and not-so-funny) carnivores.

All of these titles can be found in our ebook collection and their descriptions are from our catalog. If you haven’t found it on our website already, we have created a page that links to our kids and teen electronic book selection.

Enjoy!

Picture Books

We Don’t Eat Our Classmates by Ryan T. Higgins
It’s the first day of school for Penelope Rex, and she can’t wait to meet her classmates. But it’s hard to make human friends when they’re so darn delicious! That is, until Penelope gets a taste of her own medicine and finds she may not be at the top of the food chain after all. . . . Readers will gobble up this hilarious new story from award-winning author-illustrator Ryan T. Higgins.

Carnivores by Aaron Reynolds
The lion is king of the jungle!
The great white shark is sovereign of the seas!
The timber wolf is emperor of the forests!
But . . . it’s lonely at the top of the food chain. It’s difficult to fit in when plant eaters can be so cruel—just because you ate a relative of theirs that one time! What’s a carnivore to do? Aaron Reynolds’s roaringly funny text is perfectly paired with Dan Santat’s mouthwatering illustrations, creating a toothsome book that’s sure to stand out from the herd.

I’m the Biggest Thing in the Ocean! By Kevin Sherry
When a giant squid takes inventory of all of the creatures in the ocean, he realizes that he’s way bigger than most of them! Of course, there are bigger things lurking around . . . but maybe this giant squid with a giant touch of hubris doesn’t really care?

Beginning Chapter Books

The Bad Guys by Aaron Blabey
They sound like bad guys, they look like bad guys . . . and they even smell like bad guys. But Mr. Wolf, Mr. Piranha, Mr. Snake, and Mr. Shark are about to change all of that…
Mr. Wolf has a daring plan for the Bad Guys’ first good mission. They are going to break two hundred dogs out of the Maximum Security City Dog Pound. Will Operation Dog Pound go smoothly? Will the Bad Guys become the Good Guys? And will Mr. Snake please stop swallowing Mr. Piranha?!

Non-Fiction

Running with Wolves: Our Story of Life with the Sawtooth Pack by Jim Dutcher and Jamie Dutcher
Discover the wonder of wolves from Emmy-award winning filmmakers Jim and Jamie Dutcher as they tell their story of the six years they watched, learned, and lived with the Sawtooth wolf pack. Adventure, friendship, and family come together in this riveting memoir as two award-winning filmmakers take you through the experience of the years they spent living in the wild with a real-life wolf pack.

National Geographic Readers: Sharks! by Anne Schreiber
He’s quick. He’s silent. He has five rows of deadly teeth. Chomp! Meet the shark-the fish who ruled the deep before dinosaurs roamed the Earth! This fish has soft cartilage so he can glide, twist, and turn before his prey can say “gulp!” Cool photos bring kids into the shark’s world. Fun facts go deep into the shark’s scary science.

National Geographic Readers: Deadliest Animals by Melissa Stewart
Did you know that a tiny golf ball-sized creature called the blue-ringed octopus contains enough venom to kill 26 adult humans? Or why the Sydney funnel web spider is one of the most dangerous creatures in the world? In this Level 3 book, kids will be fascinated by 12 species that you hope you’ll never come across! Sharks, snakes, jellyfish and more-these creatures are among the most threatening-and interesting-in the world!

Comics Wherever, Whenever

IMG_8307

Did someone say dinner?

I realize I’m not breaking any news by saying it’s been a strange few weeks, but man…it’s been a strange few weeks! If you’re like me, staying home may have seemed like a fun idea for the first forty-five minutes. Then began the fidgeting, the laps around the living room, the trips to the snack cabinet, all while scolding the dog that 2 p.m. is not dinnertime. Even removed from the stressful headlines and creeping anxiety, long days at home are not easy for me! If you, like me, might be looking for an escape, then let me lead you to the wonderful world of Hoopla’s digital comics and graphic novels. 

Margo wrote a wonderful introduction to Hoopla last week, and while the streaming tv and music are great, it’s the comics where I get my money’s worth – a pretty easy task since the service is FREE with my library card! If you’ve never read digital comics, it is definitely a process that takes some getting used to. If you have one available, I’d suggest using a tablet or computer instead of your phone. One really nice feature that Hoopla offers is the ability to zoom in on individual cells of a comic, allowing an easier reading experience, albeit sometimes at the expense of the big picture. To activate the zoom, simply click once with your mouse on a computer, or tap the screen twice on a phone or tablet. 

Wondering where to begin? I get it! There is an almost-overwhelming number of titles to choose from, and you can’t really go wrong. But if you do want some suggestions, here are some old favorites and recent titles I’ve enjoyed.

New Kid by Jerry Craft
Well, this one feels like cheating. New Kid is an incredible read and a slam dunk recommendation for readers of all ages. The main character is endearing and relatable, his experiences are profound and enlightening, and Craft’s artwork and storytelling are skillful and moving. It is no wonder that New Kid was the first graphic novel to ever win the Newbery Medal

This incredible book follows Jordan, a young black seventh grader attending a new school, a private academy where he will be surrounded by wealthier classmates and be one of the few students of color. As Jordan struggles to adjust and adapt to this new environment and the ways that his identity and family background affect his treatment, he also has to contend with the more traditional new-school experiences: making friends, dealing with teachers and parents who might mean well, but sometimes don’t get it. In a clever bit of storytelling, Craft features Jordan’s sketches within this book, allowing the reader to see more directly how Jordan’s treatment by others makes him feel. 

No Ivy League by Hazel Newlevant
In some ways, this quick moving graphic memoir takes the concept of New Kid and throws it into reverse. This book follows Hazel, a 17-year-old home-schooled senior as she embarks on a summer job clearing invasive ivy from a park in Portland, Oregon. Hazel’s life to this point has been rather sheltered and she is not completely prepared for the diverse range of experiences, backgrounds, and identities she encounters among her new co-workers. This frank book does not shy away from uncomfortable encounters in Hazel’s life and while at times her personal growth seems to come a bit too easily, I appreciate the way that Newlevant examines privilege and prejudice in a relatable coming of age story. 

I Am Not Okay with This by Charles Forsman
If you are a Netflix fan you might have stumbled upon a strange, violent, and darkly hilarious new show called I Am Not Okay with This. And if you, like me, found out the show was based on a comic, you might’ve wished you could read it. Great news! This very adult comic is on Hoopla. Truthfully, the black-and-white line-drawn style was not what I was expecting from this story, but I loved it nonetheless. 

Like the TV show, this comic follows a teenaged girl named Sydney as she grapples with her romantic feelings for her best friend, a tense relationship with her mother, the death of her father, experimentation with sex and drugs, and her violent, uncontrollable superpower. You know, the normal teen stuff! This comic is equal parts twisted and delightful and I loved every second I spent with it. 

Dept. H by Matt Kindt & Sharlene Kindt
This is one where I feel like the less I tell you the better. Of all the comics I am writing about, I find the artwork here to be the most gorgeous. Dept. H follows Mia, an investigator who travels to an undersea research station to solve a murder. Things quickly grow….complicated (and deadly!) as her romantic and familial connections to the station and its inhabitants pull her in conflicting directions. This is a taut and surprising comic that crosses genres with ease while building a fascinating world. 

Harley Quinn: Breaking Glass by Mariko Tamaki & Steve Pugh
Are we in the midst of a Harley Quinnaissance? I think we might be! She has the big DC movie, which I really wish I could watch (release it now!) and the animated tv show on the DC Universe streaming network, which I really wish I could watch (bring it to Hoopla!). Luckily, Breaking Glass provides a delightful YA origin story for Harley. Follow Harley as she makes her way in Gotham City, makes some good friends named Ivy and Joker, and finds a way to save a drag queen’s cabaret from the evils of gentrification. I’ve always been a Marvel person, but Harley might just make me switch sides. 

Rebels: These Free and Independent States by Brian Woods, Andrea Mutti, and Lauren Affe
Let’s move on to some history. This book is actually a follow-up to Rebels: A Well-Regulated Militia, which is unfortunately not available on Hoopla. When the library is able to reopen, find it there! Luckily, both these books work perfectly well as standalones. In this newer collection, Woods tells the story of John Abbott, a young ship builder caught up in the chaos, violence, and politics of the War of 1812. This book might best be considered high drama with a side of history, but it gives fascinating context and vivid color to an oft-forgotten period in US history. 

Simon Says Vol. 1: Nazi Hunter by Andre Frattino and Jesse Lee
Listen, we know not to judge a book by its cover. This time I’m asking you not to judge one by its title. Like Rebels, this comic takes a true piece of history and embellishes, perhaps at times wildly. I don’t know how much in common this comic’s Simon has with the actual Nazi hunter, Simon Wiesenthal, so I am assuming it is all fiction. That said, this is a thrilling romp of a noire comic. It follows Simon, a Jewish artist in Germany shortly after the Nuremberg trials. Simon lost his family at the hands of the Nazis and he is now driven by a single task: to take his revenge one Nazi officer at a time. Violent vigilante justice meets unimaginable trauma in a story that feels destined for film or series adaptation. 

Of course, Hoopla doesn’t just have comics, so I also want to highlight the three albums (all on Hoopla!) that I was listening to while I wrote this.

Chika Industry Games and Jay Electronica A Written Testimony
They say good things come to those who wait, and these two albums prove it! I’ve been a fan of Chika for a few years, since she started popping up on Instagram ripping incredible freestyles and building a devoted following. Ever since, I’ve been waiting for a proper album and she delivered with Industry Games. Chika is not afraid to go dual threat and crush a hook, but she truly shines as a rapper, bundling incredible lyrical dexterity and clever wordplay with effortless swagger. This is a rising force to be reckoned with. 

On the other hand, I truly have no idea how long I’ve been waiting for Jay Electronica’s debut full length. Twelve years? As an artist, he has been elusive and enigmatic, and at times plain infuriating, so I had no idea what to expect from this album. It turns out he gave us a masterpiece. No one else rhymes quite like he does, and he brought ALL of the heat to this album, building on beautiful production, complexly layered references, and perfect delivery. If all of this doesn’t move the needle for you, JAY-Z also features on nearly every track. 

Overcoats The Fight 
I almost always listen to hip-hop, but when I don’t, I’m probably bopping to Overcoats. This duo makes the perfect blend of electro-pop and indie folk. Harmonized vocals, soaring melodies, and maybe even an occasional hand clap. What are you waiting for?

How to stay busy: eBooks to Create, Garden, and Organize

If you are one of those people who just has to stay busy (I know how you feel!) and you’re stuck at home going stir crazy, check out some recently added eBooks that may help inspire you in a new direction.

Arts, Crafts, and Hobbies
Since I can’t do my Create @ the Library programs right now, I wanted to find some how-to arts and crafts books to keep our regular attendees, and everyone else, creating.

Everyday Watercolor and Everyday Watercolor Flowers by Jenna Rainey

Milk Soaps: 35 Skin-Nourishing Recipes for Making Milk-Enriched Soaps, from Goat to Almond by Anne-Marie Faiola

Making a Life: Working by Hand and Discovering the Life You Are Meant to Live by Melanie Falick

Japanese Wonder Crochet: A Creative Approach to Classic Stitches by Nihon Vogue

Crochet Every Way Stitch Dictionary: 125 Essential Stitches to Crochet in Three Ways by Dora Ohrenstein

Sew Bags: The Practical Guide to Making Purses, Totes, Clutches & More; 13 Skill-Building Projects by Hilarie Wakefield Dayton

Gardening (and Nature)
We have had some beautiful weather perfect for gardening, so while we may feel gloomy inside, if we get our hands in the soil, whether in our indoor window gardens, our small urban plots, or the ‘back 40’ we can’t help but feel some hope.

Small Garden Style: A Design Guide for Outdoor Rooms and Containers by Isa Hendry Eaton and Jennifer Blaise Kramer

The Timber Press Guide to Gardening in the Pacific Northwest by Carol and Norman Hall

The Ann Lovejoy Handbook of Northwest Gardening by Ann Lovejoy

DIY Gardening Projects: 35 Awesome Gardening Hacks to Better Your Garden by Cheryl Palmer

Field Guide to Urban Gardening: How to Grow Plants, No Matter Where You Live by Kevin  Espiritu

Nature’s Best Hope: A New Approach to Conservation that Starts in Your Yard by Douglas W. Tallamy

Wilding: Returning Nature to Our Farm by Isabella Tree

Home Organizing
If I wasn’t working from home right now I might just try to dig in, toss out or recycle, and get organized. Maybe. If you have more motivation than I do for organizing, check out these titles for some inspiration.

Martha Stewart’s Organizing : the Manual for Bringing Order to Your Life, Home & Routines by Martha Stewart

Outer Order, Inner Calm: Declutter and Organize to Make More Room for Happiness by Gretchen Rubin

The Home Edit: A Guide to Organizing and Realizing Your House Goals by Clea Shearer

The Gentle Art of Swedish Death Cleaning: How to Free Yourself and Your Family from a Lifetime of Clutter by Margareta Magnusson

The Longing for Less: Living with Minimalism by Kyle Chayka

I hope you enjoy some of these new-to-the-library eBooks and find ways to keep occupied and engaged during these unprecedented times we are living in.

Spring Cleaning

Welcome to SPRING!

What a crazy world we are living in right now! Schools and businesses closed, everyone social distancing themselves and staying home…. We are trying to stay healthy, but still needing to find something to keep ourselves occupied.

When I was growing up, and the long summer vacation had us all bored by July, we learned not to come to my mom and say “There’s nothing to do” because she would give us a chore: clean, dust, vacuum or whatever. Her imagination or list never ended… there was always something to do.

So for those of you stuck at home, it is spring and that means spring housecleaning! And, knowing you are stuck at home, you can begin by starting at the library website and checking out some eBooks from home!

To build some inspiration, I would start with The Berenstain Bears and the Messy Room. Be sure to have the kids read this as well so they see the benefit of cleaning. You can make it fun, divide and write down chores into small tasks (dust end table in living room, wipe down counter in the bathroom, pick up clothes in the bedroom, wipe down windowsills) and then have everyone draw a chore. Make a contest out of it and see who can do the most slips in 2 hours.

Then, work your way into The Minimalist Home : a Room-by-Room Guide to a Decluttered, Refocused Life to really clear out all the clutter in your home and get ready to deep clean. Be warned, this may take until fall if your house is anything like mine!

You may want to skip the decluttering for now and go straight to Feng Shui For Success : Simple Principles for a Healthy Home and Prosperous Business to start applying the four basic principles of Feng Shui and create an optimal home environment. Basic Principle #1: protect your back. Basic Principle #2: minimize sharp edges, points, and corners.  Basic Principle #3: incorporate images and materials from nature. Basic Principle #4: create balance between extremes.

When you have your home finished, you can even give YOU a spring cleaning with
Super Cleanse: Detox Your Body for Long-Lasting Health and Beauty.

But maybe you aren’t motivated enough to do any of these things. You can read about dusting in the novel Citizen Vince by Jess Walter. Here is a summary of the book: At 1:59 a.m. in Spokane, Washington–eight days before the 1980 presidential election–Vince Camden pockets his stash of stolen credit cards and drops by an all-night poker game before heading to his witness-protection job dusting crullers at Donut Make You Hungry. Along with a neurotic hooker girlfriend, this is the total sum of Vince’s new life. But when a familiar face shows up in town, Vince realizes his sordid past is still too close behind him. During the next unforgettable week, he’ll negotiate a coast-to-coast maze of obsessive cops, eager politicians, and assorted mobsters–only to find that redemption might exist, of all places, in the voting booth.

So, this is just one idea of what you can do while you are staying at home. Stay healthy, safe and occupied!

New eBooks and eAudiobooks from EPL

With the temporary closure of our libraries due to the coronavirus, we are working to boost our e-content – that’s just a library term for eBooks and eAudiobooks, but it also can apply to anything digital that we offer to our patrons, like movies, documentaries, and even learning resources such as Lynda.com. But back to eBooks, this week you can find more than twice the usual amount of new and new-to-us titles in both Overdrive and cloudLibrary!

Tip: Although many readers look for titles directly from the apps, to see all our e-books in one place, use the library catalog and limit to eBooks or eAudiobooks. You can then check out right from the catalog (after logging in) and find the book ready in the app, or jump over to the app and search for the specific title you found.

Recent additions to explore:

Fiction
Cozy: The Authenticity Project by Clare Pooley (eBook)*

Dystopian: The Fortress by S.A. Jones (eBook)*

General Fiction: Weather by Jenny Offill (eAudio)*

The Mountains Sing by Que Mai Phan Nguyen (eBook)*

The Shape of Family by Shilpi Somaya Gowda (eBook)*

Gothic/Literary: After Me Comes the Flood by Sarah Perry (eAudio)*

Gothic/Mystery: Things in Jars by Jess Kidd (eBook) *

Suspense/Mystery: The Tenant by Katrine Engberg (eBook) *

Thriller: Before Familiar Woods by Ian Pisarcik (eBook)*

Non-fiction
Biography: John Adams Under Fire: The Founding Father’s Fight for Justice in the Boston Massacre Murder Trial by David Fisher with Dan Abrams (eBook)*

Business/Sociology: Pharma: Greed, Lies, and the Poisoning of America by Gerald Posner (eAudiobook)*

Upstream: The Quest to Solve Problems Before They Happen by Dan Heath (eBook)*

History, WWII: I Want You to Know We’re Still Here: A Post-Holocaust Memoir by Esther Safran Foer (eBook)*

Memoir: Rust by Eliese Colette Goldbach (eBook)*

Politics/Self-improvement: Lead from the Outside by Stacey Abrams (eBook)*

Psychology: Hello I Want to Die Please Fix Me: Depression in the First Person by Anna Mehler Paperny (eBook)*

Self-help: Untamed by Glennon Doyle (eBook)*

Prefer something familiar and beloved in these stressful times? Just this week we have a new crop of Duke Classics. Consider using this time to finally read those book you’ve always meant to.

Take a look at all of our newest Overdrive eBooks, eAudiobooks, and just added cloudLibrary titles, and you’ll be sure to find your next great read.

A Silver Lining

While the closing of both of our locations here at the Everett Pubic Library, due to the COVID-19 outbreak, is definitely a disappointment to all of us, there is one silver lining: it is a great time to learn about, and take advantage of, our many digital services. If you haven’t accessed them before, you might be surprised to discover just how many materials and databases we have to offer electronically. And best of all, they can all be enjoyed from the comfort of your own home.

Today’s post will introduce you to one of our most popular digital services: eBooks & eAudiobooks

The library has a large number of both eBooks and eAudiobooks for you to enjoy. While there is a little bit of a learning curve at first, once you get your account set up the first time, it definitely gets easier. Our two providers are OverDrive and CloudLibrary. While they are slightly different, they both operate in much the same way: You download an app to your reading or listening device, register with your library card on the app, and then begin checking out.

Definitely take a look at our basic explanation of how the process works on our webpage as a starting point. We also have more specific instructions on getting both OverDrive and CloudLibrary on your device. If you run into trouble, both OverDrive and CloudLibrary have detailed help pages to address specific issues and provide solutions. While we normally encourage people to bring in their devices or to set up a Book a Librarian session so we can walk you through the process, those services are not available at this time. Once we are back up and running though, please do come in!

In the meantime, stay tuned for more posts highlighting our large array of digital services. The perfect way to connect with the library during the unique times we are living through.

It’s Like “The Sixth Sense.” But Good.

Great news! I have the perfect book for this Halloween season and I’m only two weeks late! That might not seem particularly helpful now, but all things being equal, this is the perfect book for any season, especially the wet, cold, and dark days of November through…(sigh) May. Leigh Bardugo is a name I’ve mentioned here before. Her Grishaverse novels are among my favorites, so I was ready to love Ninth House, her debut for adult audiences. Yet even with high expectations, it left me incredibly impressed and desperate for a sequel. 

81pqCEtTAgL

Alex Stern can see dead people. While this might seem neat to the gothically inclined, it makes Alex’s life a nightmare. For as long as she can remember, ghosts have lurked around her, decorated with the grisly evidence of their unseemly demises (semi-decapitated heads, gunshot wounds, etc.). Her grim ‘ability’ drives her in a dangerous direction – she is a teenage runaway under the influence of drugs, alcohol, and selfish, manipulative men. And yet, when she wakes in a hospital after a violent and tragic night, a tidy gentleman is waiting by her bedside suggesting that her power might open doors to a fresh start in an unlikely environment – Yale University. 

It turns out that New Haven, Connecticut is a city brimming with potent magic. This supernatural resource is channeled by eight ancient houses at Yale which operate under the guise of secret societies, while playing a huge role in world affairs, from throwing elections, to manipulating securities markets, to boosting pop star’s careers. This magic, however, can be extremely dangerous which is why a ninth house, Lethe, was formed to monitor the use of magic by Yale’s young elites. With her powerful connection to the supernatural, Lethe believes that Alex will make a valuable warden against the abuse of magic.  

Alex is assigned to train under the wing of Darlington, an uptight but brilliant and charismatic senior. Darlington has high standards and is skeptical that Alex has the necessary character or background to thrive in this world. At first, Darlington appears to be correct. Alex struggles to learn the rites and history that Lethe demands of her, while also suffering from the academic pressure of student life at Yale and the weight of managing a secret life as a college freshman. Just as she begins to get a feel for her many different roles at Yale, everything falls apart. Darlington disappears under strange and sinister circumstances and a young woman is murdered on campus, with Alex suspecting involvement by at least one of the houses. Alex is left to deal with magical forces she is only beginning to understand, indifferent bureaucracies, and rich, privileged, students who are empowered by a heady mix of supernatural power, generational wealth, and good old-fashioned toxic masculinity. Oh, also someone definitely wants Alex dead, and is not being shy about it. 

Ninth House is told in a non-linear fashion. I’m an impatient reader, and I am often annoyed by this style of storytelling, but not when a master of the genre like Bardugo is at the helm. Alex is an incredibly fun protagonist to follow – she is both self-aware and self-destructive, incredibly capable, but not unrealistically so, and a narrator of very questionable reliability. Bardugo is not just a deft writer, but also a thoughtful one. She is able to take a thrilling story of magic, power, and corruption and weave in a mediation on the destructive power of trauma without a whiff of heavy-handed moralizing. Books with magic can be a tricky proposition, especially for adult audiences, but Bardugo manages to make the magic in Alex’s world both frighteningly powerful and almost laughably mundane, grounding the supernatural in the onerous burden of everyday reality. Ninth House has already been picked up as a potential streaming series, which is why I looked up from the book and exclaimed to my partner “they have to cast Danny DeVito as Anderson Cooper!” But you’ll have to read the book to understand why.