The Periodical Tableaux v1 i2

Let’s make some money…or at least read something about money. The latter, of course, always free at Everett Public Library.

All e-magazines are readily available through OverDrive/Libby via your Library account. For assistance, call the Reference Desk @ 425-257-8000.

EPL, a long-time Coin World print subscriber, now boasts even more numismatic titles in e-magazine format – a doubling down if you will:

  • Banknote Reporter
  • Coin Collector
  • Coins
  • Numismatic News
  • World Coin News

We also have numerous titles on finance, business, and economics with many in both print and digital formats, for example:

  • Inc (print & dig)
  • Fast Company (print & dig)
  • Kiplinger (print & dig)
  • Entrepreneur (print & dig)
  • The Economist (print & dig)

With all this print & digital money talk, one might be forgiven for making the leap, however ponderous, to the difference between traditional metal coins , e.g. gold specie standard , vs digital currency , e.g. Bitcoin .

From a recent Numismatic News, there is a fascinating article about the minting of the 1857 one cent piece. Due to increasing copper prices (attributable to the discovery of gold in California and the subsequent impact on other precious metals, namely silver) pennies were, suddenly, too expensive…

“…The weight of the copper cent had remained unchanged since 1795, when it had been fixed at 168 grains (10.89 grams), but on several occasions in the early 1850s the cost of making a cent piece had come close to face value…In the spring of 1852, the cost of prepared planchets [the respective metal discs struck into coins]…actually hit the 42-cent level…an absolute loss even if other expenses were not added…”  “From Copper to Copper-Nickel”, Numismatic News, 06/22/2021, R.W. Julian

The new one cent would be very different…

“…The proposed coin also marked a radical departure from the past. From 1793 it had been government policy to make the cent in such a way as to contain nearly full value in copper but still light enough to show a profit. In 1856, however, the Mint was suggesting that the intrinsic value be lowered drastically…” “From Copper to Copper-Nickel”, Numismatic News, 06/22/2021, R.W. Julian

This phenomenon has terms, brassage and seigniorage

“…By the late 13th century, all mints within a given political entity were under direct control of the sovereign. The mints were run as businesses by private entrepreneurs, who leased the physical plant and capital equipment for fixed terms. Individuals…could…deliver their metal…and they would be paid back, within a few weeks, in newly minted coins of the same metal they brought in. They always received back less fine metal than they brought in. Part of what was withheld by the mint paid for production costs and was called brassage. The rest was sent to the sovereign as profit, or tax, and was called seigniorage. For convenience, we will use gross seigniorage for the sum of brassage and seigniorage…”  “The Debasement Puzzle: An Essay on Medieval Monetary History”, Quarterly Review of the Federal Reserve Back of Minneapolis, Vol 21, No 4, Fall 1997, Arthur Rolnick, et al

In the case of the U.S. Mint, gross seigniorage for the copper penny was trending toward loss, as opposed to profit, unless the amount of copper per coin was substantially reduced.

Now to Bitcoin and its minting or, more accurately, Bitcoin Mining

“For years, Chinese [Bitcoin] miners…were enabled by the glut of cheap…electricity in China….At their height in 2018, China’s bitcoin prospectors accounted for 74% of the world’s bitcoin production.” “Bitcoin Miners Exit China, Beat A Path to The U.S. As Crypto Climate Shifts”, The Washington Post / Seattle Times, 06/21/2021, Gerry Shih

The price of that electricity was considerably cheaper just one year ago…

“…[at] $0.04/kwh, miners based in China said that the breakeven cost to mine Bitcoin hovers in the $5,000 to $6,000 range…” “Why the Actual Cost of Mining Bitcoin Can Leave It Vulnerable to a Deep Correction”, Forbes, 07/07/2020, Joseph Young

From the below graphics, one can see the dramatic difference (especially “Profit per year”) with only disparate electricity costs factored in – something akin to the rise in copper prices in the late 1850s.

In this example, Sichuan, China’s 4-cents / KWh vs Boston, MA’s 22-cents / KWh with a price of $33,488 for a single Bitcoin.

CryptoCompare data from 7/01/2021 w/2019 Seattle City Light KWh price listings

As can be readily seen, migrating mining operations from a cheap electricity location to a more expensive electricity location easily threatens the “Profit per year” – ultimately, the gross seigniorage – of any Bitcoin mining operation.

And it is not just the mining of Bitcoin that is so costly, but the spending as well… 

“…In periods of high activity, as witnessed during much of 2021, bitcoin burns more energy than the whole of Argentina. The glaring inefficiencies of that process also explain why payments in bitcoin are slow and costly, and thus a rarity…” “Can Bitcoin Be Bettered?”, The Economist, 06/24/2021

Indeed, even the new 1857 one cent piece experienced something similar…

“As early as the spring 1858, so many of the new coins were in daily use that merchants bean to complain about the excess number of them to be found in their tills. These coins were not legal tender and those with large accumulations still had to use a broker to change them into gold or silver. Banks would not do this except for small amounts.” “From Copper to Copper-Nickel”, Numismatic News, 06/22/2021, R.W. Julian

So, in many ways, it appears the rules of money, at least in its minting, are slow to change, if at all. Indeed, running with Bitcoin no less a burden than gold itself.

To put it more poetically…

Everybody needs money. That’s why they call it money.”

Mickey Bergman (Danny DeVito’s character from David Mamet’s 2001 movie “Heist”)

With a that in mind, I might well recommend another of our medium-of-exchange, if not medium-heat, themed titles…

XTC: It’s Not Just for Raves!

It was a freezing winter day, something like 5 a.m., and I was spinning the hits as I know them on KWCW, the pride of Whitman College. But this was to be a day like no other! As it became abundantly clear that the stylus on one of the turntables was broken, a fine sheen of panic seized my brain. You see, CDs had not been invented yet and you needed two, two, two turntables in one to run a radio show. Sadly, I was down to my last turntable. In an attempt to salvage the situation and save humankind for another day I threw on an entire side of Black Sea by XTC until the damaged stylus was replaced. And thus began a love affair that will continue until the gates of time come crashing down on baby New Year.

It’s hard to recall exactly which XTC album I encountered first. Perhaps it was Drums and Wires, a quirky pop gem that came out in 1979 and featured unforgettable songs like Making Plans for Nigel and When You’re Near Me I Have Difficulty. Or it might just as easily have been Black Sea on that fateful winter morning. But by the release of English Settlement and the tight rotation of the single Senses Working Overtime on KZAM in the summer of 1982, I was eating XTC for breakfast, lunch and dinner. The band. Not the illicit drug.

The group is a bit steeped in mystery. Andy Partridge, their brilliant songwriter/guitarist/ singer has been plagued by a variety of health issues that led to the band’s cessation of touring. In fact, I was set to see them in 1982 when they cancelled due to jaundice. But the scope of their songs is far beyond the live performance capabilities of three or four lads, so I’ve always thought of them as a band that makes fabulous records but doesn’t perform live. And that’s okay.

Their songs are psychedelic, Beatlesque, poppy, sometimes huge, quirky, and incredibly perfect. From the punkish spasms of White Music and Go 2 to the pop perfection of Drums and Wires, the hugely orchestral rock of Black Sea, English Settlement, Mummer, The Big Express and Skylarking, these fellas have created some of the best music I’ve encountered. And now, through the magic of Hoopla, you too can experience XTC.

Starting with Drums and Wires, and I’m not at all certain this was done intentionally, most XTC albums contain one long, huge-in-scope song that generally grows from nothing, climaxes in a frothy release of decibels, and returns to nothing. These became my favorites. Complicated Game features Partridge rabidly shouting the song title. Travels in Nihilon creates an unending drone of tom toms and synthetic-sounding buzzsaw notes under chanted vocals. Jason and the Argonauts, Deliver us from the Elements, Train Running Low on Soul Coal, Dear God… all are songs of epic proportion.

So the moral of this story is: Listen to XTC! You can find most of their albums on Hoopla and, wait for it, it’s free and legal to hear them! And it’s filled with your daily requirement of niacin! In the immortal words of 17th century mathematician Robert Hooke as he reviewed Drums and Wires, “Hey, that’s acute angle.”

The Periodical Tableaux v1 i1

With the Library re-opened, you, dear Patron, may have noticed our magazine shelves look a bit different, denuded even! Indeed, there may be fewer print magazines (thanks, 2020!) but we have oh so many more e-magazines. All are readily available through OverDrive/Libby via your library account.

For assistance with your Libby account, call the Reference Desk @ 425-257-8000 (tue-sat | 10-6).

In this and forthcoming posts, we shall delve into our newly acquired e-magazines ecosystem – as well as our legacy print – and tease out the nuggets and, hopefully, discover some new favorites.

Firstly, we might recall what we lost…unfortunately, about 130 print titles we could not replace; fortunately, we were able to replace 76 lost print tiles with their digital equivalent.

As for the 130 lost print titles, future posts will look at which new e-magazines might work best for mitigating their absence.  

For example, let’s look at the very first magazine in our catalog’s strict alpha-numeric ordering and, by coincidence, the first cut from our renewal list…425 Magazine, a celebration of King County’s Eastside. One might simply swap with our print version of Seattle Metropolitan Magazine, but that might be just a bit 206 for y’all.

So, does EPL possess any subject-equivalent e-magazines within our new holdings? Unfortunately, not yet. However, if one simply must have a magazine with the numeral “4” in the title, we do have you covered.

Our first contender might be 0024 Horloges, fancy watches, fancy prices, written in fancy French, a oui, indeed.

No time for watches? Then, how about 4×4 Magazine Australia? Plenty of intriguing articles, insightful reviews, and written in plain ol’ Australian.

All that wheelin’ making you hungry? Try 400 Calories or Less: Easy Italian, the Spaghetti Pie w/ prosciutto and peas (pg. 27) is particularly intriguing.

Or, J-14 (a lost print-mag now in e-mag format) for youth enthralled with youth celebrity, youth fashion, youth music, youth etc.…

Of course, not all celebrity is for the kids, Victoria: Fabulous at 40 lists as a one-off devoted to the most famous Spice Girl married to a former soccer great.

Speaking of footing the ball, the new collection also boasts many other historical editions, e.g. World Cup Guide 2014 & The Complete Guide to World Cup 2014. While the 2014 teams’ rosters are a bit dated, these issues also highlight Cups gone by with results and standout performances. Lest we forget, Team USA placed 3rd in the 1930 competition.

Until next time, keep browsing…

Northwest Room Update: Japan Bazaar

A chance find while doing research in the Enid Nordlund collection of early Everett photographs turned up a picture of the Japan Bazaar at its first location at 1205 Hewitt. A Reading Life previously published an in-depth look at this business and the Kan family who ran it; you can explore that history here.

At first glance this image might not tell you much beyond the caption written at the top, and the extra information on the back. On the back someone had speculated that the picture was taken from the roof of a building at Pacific and Nassau around 1904 or 1905. Historian Jack O’Donnell pointed out that the large building on the right side of the foreground was still standing, and was actually one block north on Wall.

Image from the Enid Nordlund collection, Everett Public Library

Zooming in on a high resolution scan of an image can provide a lot of clues if you know what to look for. Many of these buildings had signs for businesses, which could be looked up in our Polk City Directories to help pin down an approximate year for the image. The bold lettering on the brick building to the left and midway back caught my eye. While it was a little bit blurry, it looked like “Japan Bazaar.” Ok… maybe more than a bit blurry, but bear with me.

Close up of the Japan Bazaar and Windsor Hotel – 1200 block of Hewitt.

From the directories and other sources I could confirm that the Japan Bazaar was located at 1205 Hewitt from 1901-1904. Across the street you can see the sign for the Windsor Hotel, which was at 1202 Hewitt, which helps confirm that I had the right block and that I wasn’t misreading the other blurry sign. The Japan Bazaar temporarily moved to 1924 Hewitt in 1905-06, before settling in at 1410 Hewitt in 1907, where it remained until it closed sometime between 1910 and 1911. It was around that time, as noted in the previous article, that the Kan family appear to have moved back to Seattle.

Sometimes it’s the little finds like this that make exploring our historic photos so much more enjoyable! It was nice to add another image of this business to our collection to join the lovely photo we have of the Kan family inside their 1410 Hewitt location.

https://nw.epls.org/digital/collection/EvrtMassacre/id/161/rec/1

Seek the Unknown

Have you checked out the libraries eBook and eAudio collections lately? If not, you are in for a treat. One of the few silver linings of the current times in the library world, is the growing collections of electronic materials due to the emphasis on eFormats. The Everett Public Library is no exception and has added a lot of excellent new content. 

There are lots of great curated lists of titles on our Overdrive site, but I was particularly excited to find the collection, Seek the Unkown: Sci-Fi & Fantasy Reads. Like many lately, I’ve been in need of reading distractions and Science Fiction is my go to genre when I want to avoid the current situation at maximum warp. Here are a few of the titles that I’m particularly looking forward to downloading, complete with descriptions from the catalog.  

The Preserve by Ariel Winter 

Decimated by plague, the human population is now a minority. Robots—complex AIs almost indistinguishable from humans—are the ruling majority. Nine months ago, in a controversial move, the robot government opened a series of preserves, designated areas where humans can choose to live without robot interference. Now the preserves face their first challenge: someone has been murdered. 

Bright and Dangerous Objects by Anneliese MacKintosh 

Commercial deep-sea diver Solvig has a secret. She wants to be one of the first human beings to colonize Mars, and she’s one of a hundred people shortlisted by the Mars Project to do just that. But to fulfil her ambition, she’ll have to leave behind everything she’s ever known—for the rest of her life. 

The Light Years by R.W.W. Greene 

Hisako Saski was born with her life already mapped out. In exchange for an education, better housing for her family, and a boost out of poverty, she’s been contracted into an arranged marriage to Adem Sadiq, a maintenance engineer and amateur musician who works and lives aboard his family’s sub-light freighter, the Hajj. 

The Companions by Katie M. Flynn 

Wealthy participants in the ‘companionship’ program choose to upload their consciousness before dying, so they can stay in the custody of their families. The less fortunate are rented out to strangers upon their death, but all companions become the intellectual property of Metis Corporation, creating a new class of people–a command-driven product-class without legal rights or true free will.

The Autobiography of Kathryn Janeway by Una McCormack 

Kathryn Janeway reveals her career in Starfleet, from her first command to her epic journey through the Delta Quadrant leading to her rise to the top as vice-admiral in Starfleet Command. Discover the story of the woman who travelled further than any human ever had before, stranded decades from home, encountering new worlds and species. 

These are just a few of the titles that caught my eye. Be sure to check out the full list for even more intriguing titles. Happy reading! 

Writer’s Live: Tiffany Midge, Madeleine Henry & Jennifer Bardsley

The great virtual programs just keep coming here at the library. There are so many in fact that we wanted to point out two author talks you can attend next week so you wouldn’t miss out. The presentations are part of our Writer’s Live series, which is dedicated to highlighting talented writers and their works. Both programs are free, open to the public, and you can register to attend on our Crowdcast channel. Read on to find out more. 

Tiffany Midge on Bury My Heart at Chuck E. Cheese’s 

Tuesday, March 2, 2021 @ 6:00 PM  

Why is there no Native woman David Sedaris? Or Native Anne Lamott? Humor categories in publishing are packed with books by funny women and humorous sociocultural-political commentary—but no Native women. Well, it’s time to meet Tiffany Midge, the author of Bury My Heart at Chuck E. Cheese’s

Midge’s book is a smart and funny collection of essays on life, politics and identity as a Native woman in America. Spend an evening laughing, thinking, and talking about anything and everything—from politics to pumpkin spice—as Midge shares stories and insights from her book. 

Madeleine Henry in conversation with Jennifer Bardsley 

Saturday, March 6, 2021 @ 5:00 PM 

Madeleine Henry is the author of two novels, The Love Proof and Breathe In, Cash Out. She has appeared on NBC, WABC, The Jenny McCarthy Show, and Inspire Living. She has been featured in the New York Post, Parade, and Observer Media. Previously, she worked at Goldman Sachs and in investment management after graduating from Yale.  

Madeleine will be joined by Jennifer Bardsley for a conversation about The Love Proof. Spanning decades, The Love Proof is an unusual love story about lasting connection, time, and intuition. It explores the course that perfect love can take between imperfect people, and urges us to listen to our hearts rather than our heads. 

Jennifer Bardsley lives in Edmonds, Wash., and her newest book, Sweet Bliss, will be published by Montlake Romance in 2021. Jennifer also writes under the pen name Louise Cypress. Jennifer has written the “I Brake for Moms” column for The Everett Herald since 2012. 

Fuse Your Brain

When it comes to learning a new topic or finding a job, it is hard to deny the power of one-on-one tutoring. It is great to have lots of resources at your fingertips but having a person to guide and critique your actions is invaluable. But how do you get that kind of help in the ‘virtual only’ world we have been living through recently? The library has one answer to that question in the form of a great new service we have just made available: Brainfuse

Simply put, Brainfuse provides live virtual tutoring for students and adult learners as well as job coaching to help you land a new position. All you need is an Everett Public Library card to gain access.

To get you started, it is good to know that Brainfuse has two distinct areas based on the kind of one-on-one help you need.

Brainfuse HelpNow is the place to go if you are a student or adult learner. The HelpNow Resource Center gives you access to live tutoring for homework help, skills building and test preparation. You can also access The Writing Lab and the 24/7 Center to submit assignments that will be reviewed and commented upon by tutors who are experts in many academic fields. There are also many study and collaboration tools to take advantage of, as well as an adult learning center.

Brainfuse JobNow is where you can interact with live online job coaches to brush up on interview techniques or get live online interview practice as well as job tips and strategies. You can also submit a resume any time and a job coach will send it back within 24 hours with detailed feedback and suggestions for improvement. You are also able to download resume templates and enjoy 24/7 access to a carefully selected library of job resources.

So whether you are studying for an exam, looking for a job or wanting to build your skill set, take advantage of Brainfuse at the Everett Public Library.

What’s New in our eLibrary?

This past year a major goal for the library has been to improve and increase our online offerings. Take a look at some of the new content we have available now.

Overdrive/Libby – New Genre Collections
We’ve added some great genre collections! Browse them all from our Overdrive home page or peruse them individually from the links below:

ComicPlus
If you love graphic novels, manga, and comics, be sure to check out ComicsPlus! There are no limits, and no need to place holds – these titles are always available. Get the app here, or sign in and read online. This incredible collection was made possible through a partnership between Comics Plus and cloudLibrary.

Magazines from Overdrive
Overdrive just dramatically increased the magazine titles available to us, and they are making more improvements to streamline finding issues of your favorites magazines in one place. They will also be adding back issues. See the whole collection here.

Don’t forget cloudLibrary
cloudLibrary is another ebook platform that has a lot of great content and much shorter holds queues. (Okay, it’s not new, but it needs more promotion!) Get the app here, and browse the whole collection on our website.

There’s so much more to explore, and new resources will be coming very soon! From Hoopla and Kanopy for streaming movies and music, to numerous online learning options, and research resources, well, there’s too much to mention here, so to see it all in one place, explore our eLibrary page.

What’s Happening at the Library?

“Life has come to a stand-still”, my coworker said to me the other day as we talked about how quiet things are right now in the library and elsewhere. But library programs and events have not stopped; in fact we in the midst of planning and scheduling a great lineup of online program for the next few months, as well as creating and distributing activity kits for all ages. We have also been busy providing curbside and phone service. Here are the details.

Upcoming events

Heating Up: The Ethics of Climate Change
What if we could tell ourselves a new story about climate change—and, in doing, so, alter our relationship to our planet?

With larger, longer wildfire seasons, accelerating species extinction, ocean acidification, and sea-level rise, it’s increasingly clear that climate change isn’t something that’s about to happen—it’s here. But while the laundry list of problems wrought by climate change is well-known, few talk about how our moral beliefs about nature have led us to the brink.

In this presentation, ethicist Brian G. Henning discusses how global warming itself is not the only problem—it’s a symptom of a larger issue concerning how we conceive of ourselves and our relationship to the natural world.

Brian G. Henning is a professor of Philosophy and Environmental Studies at Gonzaga University and has earned a PhD in philosophy. Henning has served as the inaugural faculty fellow for sustainability for three years, is the chair of the Environmental Studies department, and has delivered nearly 100 community presentations to general and academic audiences. Henning lives in Spokane.

Sign up here.

Writers Live: Every Penguin in the World with Charles Bergman
Every Penguin in the World combines narratives and photos to tell the story of the author and his wife Susan as they go on a quest to see all the world’s penguin species in the wild. The larger narrative is developed in three parts, each with its own stories: A journey of adventure, a quest for knowledge and conservation, a pilgrimage for something sacred and transformative. The penguins may need to be saved, and yet, unlike us, they do not need to be redeemed.

Join us for an amazing visual presentation about the book and the quest that inspired it! 

Charles Bergman is a writer, photographer, and speaker. He is a professor at Pacific Lutheran University.

Sign up here.

Storytimes and Youth Events

Be sure to keep an eye on our youth events calendar and storytime page as we add events and recorded storytimes!

Free Kits

Take and Make Kits – no signup required
Arrive during curbside hours and ask for the kit(s) of your choice.

Suncatcher Window Stars
Brighten up your life a little! Starting on January 5th, pick up a free kit with supplies to make four different window stars from colorful ‘kite paper’ that lets the light shine through. Follow along at your convenience with a how-to video which will be posted on that same morning on the library’s Facebook page, as well as on our YouTube page, and the Create@Home web page. Kits will be available for curbside pickup, and are first come, first served. Supplies are limited; one per household please. This project is recommended for ages 10 and up.

Kits for Preschoolers
Play and Learn Kits (a partnership with Everett Public Schools), January kit available starting 01/02/21, for ages 3 to 5 – Activities and free book to practice early math and literacy skills (for ages 3+). Online video lessons available.
Preschool Craft Kits, available starting 01/02/21, for ages 3 and up – A new DIY craft each month with materials for young children to develop fine motor skills and creativity.

Kits to reserve
Little Science Lab Kit – Register for waitlist through the Imagine Children’s Museum. Reserved only for registrants who received confirmation from the Imagine Children’s Museum.

Ongoing: Curbside service & phone and email reference

Curbside Service
We are happy to bring the library outside to you through a curbside pickup service. How does it work?
– Place holds/requests for library materials through your account at www.epls.org or by calling the Main Library at 425-257-8000 or the Evergreen Branch at 425-257-8250.
– You will be notified when your items are available to pick up. You will have 10 days to pick up your items.
– Arrive at the Library during curbside service hours. For the Main Library, call 425-257-7617.  For the Evergreen Branch, call 425-257-8260. Library staff will check out materials to your account and deliver them to your vehicle.

Phone and email reference service
Ask us! Call the reference librarians at the Main Library at 425-257-8000 or the Evergreen Branch at 425-257-8250. We can place holds for you, look up information, choose your next read, and print documents for you. Email us at libref@everettwa.gov if you prefer, or fill out this form, and we will respond as soon as possible.

We have more engaging, thought-provoking, and interactive events scheduled for February and March. Keep your eye on our calendar and be ready to sign up!

She Lies Close

A lot is going on for Grace in the novel She Lies Close by Sharon Doering.

After her husband has an affair, Grace buys a house in a new neighborhood with her two young children Wyatt and Chloe. As they are getting settled in and starting to meet people, she begins to hear rumors that her new neighbor Leland is suspected in the disappearance of a young girl. Is she really living next door to a kidnapper and murderer?

Grace can barely sleep, and becomes obsessed with the case of sweet, missing Ava. In the wee hours of the night she repeatedly watches a video that was posted of Ava singing and dancing, desperately looking for clues to her disappearance..

After she discovers that Chloe has a pocket full of tootsie rolls that she got from Leland while she was playing in their adjoining back yards, Grace begins having nightmares and sleepwalking, with reality and dreams blurring the fine line of sanity.

The police have no leads in Ava’s disappearance, and Grace continues to talk to the neighbors, asking questions to try and find the truth of what happened. Then, a body is found, and everything changes. Grace finds herself on the other end of the investigation.

I got to the last 60 pages and could NOT put the book down.

If you like a good page turner, you will really enjoy this book!