What’s Happening at the Library?

“Life has come to a stand-still”, my coworker said to me the other day as we talked about how quiet things are right now in the library and elsewhere. But library programs and events have not stopped; in fact we in the midst of planning and scheduling a great lineup of online program for the next few months, as well as creating and distributing activity kits for all ages. We have also been busy providing curbside and phone service. Here are the details.

Upcoming events

Heating Up: The Ethics of Climate Change
What if we could tell ourselves a new story about climate change—and, in doing, so, alter our relationship to our planet?

With larger, longer wildfire seasons, accelerating species extinction, ocean acidification, and sea-level rise, it’s increasingly clear that climate change isn’t something that’s about to happen—it’s here. But while the laundry list of problems wrought by climate change is well-known, few talk about how our moral beliefs about nature have led us to the brink.

In this presentation, ethicist Brian G. Henning discusses how global warming itself is not the only problem—it’s a symptom of a larger issue concerning how we conceive of ourselves and our relationship to the natural world.

Brian G. Henning is a professor of Philosophy and Environmental Studies at Gonzaga University and has earned a PhD in philosophy. Henning has served as the inaugural faculty fellow for sustainability for three years, is the chair of the Environmental Studies department, and has delivered nearly 100 community presentations to general and academic audiences. Henning lives in Spokane.

Sign up here.

Writers Live: Every Penguin in the World with Charles Bergman
Every Penguin in the World combines narratives and photos to tell the story of the author and his wife Susan as they go on a quest to see all the world’s penguin species in the wild. The larger narrative is developed in three parts, each with its own stories: A journey of adventure, a quest for knowledge and conservation, a pilgrimage for something sacred and transformative. The penguins may need to be saved, and yet, unlike us, they do not need to be redeemed.

Join us for an amazing visual presentation about the book and the quest that inspired it! 

Charles Bergman is a writer, photographer, and speaker. He is a professor at Pacific Lutheran University.

Sign up here.

Storytimes and Youth Events

Be sure to keep an eye on our youth events calendar and storytime page as we add events and recorded storytimes!

Free Kits

Take and Make Kits – no signup required
Arrive during curbside hours and ask for the kit(s) of your choice.

Suncatcher Window Stars
Brighten up your life a little! Starting on January 5th, pick up a free kit with supplies to make four different window stars from colorful ‘kite paper’ that lets the light shine through. Follow along at your convenience with a how-to video which will be posted on that same morning on the library’s Facebook page, as well as on our YouTube page, and the Create@Home web page. Kits will be available for curbside pickup, and are first come, first served. Supplies are limited; one per household please. This project is recommended for ages 10 and up.

Kits for Preschoolers
Play and Learn Kits (a partnership with Everett Public Schools), January kit available starting 01/02/21, for ages 3 to 5 – Activities and free book to practice early math and literacy skills (for ages 3+). Online video lessons available.
Preschool Craft Kits, available starting 01/02/21, for ages 3 and up – A new DIY craft each month with materials for young children to develop fine motor skills and creativity.

Kits to reserve
Little Science Lab Kit – Register for waitlist through the Imagine Children’s Museum. Reserved only for registrants who received confirmation from the Imagine Children’s Museum.

Ongoing: Curbside service & phone and email reference

Curbside Service
We are happy to bring the library outside to you through a curbside pickup service. How does it work?
– Place holds/requests for library materials through your account at www.epls.org or by calling the Main Library at 425-257-8000 or the Evergreen Branch at 425-257-8250.
– You will be notified when your items are available to pick up. You will have 10 days to pick up your items.
– Arrive at the Library during curbside service hours. For the Main Library, call 425-257-7617.  For the Evergreen Branch, call 425-257-8260. Library staff will check out materials to your account and deliver them to your vehicle.

Phone and email reference service
Ask us! Call the reference librarians at the Main Library at 425-257-8000 or the Evergreen Branch at 425-257-8250. We can place holds for you, look up information, choose your next read, and print documents for you. Email us at libref@everettwa.gov if you prefer, or fill out this form, and we will respond as soon as possible.

We have more engaging, thought-provoking, and interactive events scheduled for February and March. Keep your eye on our calendar and be ready to sign up!

EPL’s Virtual Book Club says Bah! Humbug! to 2020!

Books with a general winter theme are the focus of discussion at our next meeting of the library’s virtual book club (Stay Home, Stay Reading) December 28 from 6-7pm. Read any title–fiction or nonfiction–of your choosing inspired by winter. Nary a sprig of new spring growth takes center stage this month! On Monday, Dec. 28, join us when you like, and leave when you like during our open discussion.  

If it’s possible to love and hate a season, then winter is it for me. I detest this dark season; yet, I enjoy hibernating and reading (or listening to) stories with a wintertime setting–the genre doesn’t matter. Still I grew up in Las Vegas, and grabbing a heavy sweater if you went out was about it for outside winter prep. The past years, starting around the Winter Solstice, even the cat knows now to look for me on the couch under a blanket, book in hand. In terms of daylight, Winter Solstice (December 21 this year) in Everett is 7 hours, 34 minutes shorter than on the longest day of the year, June Solstice. Las Vegas is a mere 4 hours, 55 minutes shorter than its longest day. I continue to adapt. 

A book with a chilly setting seems to be more haunting, or it can add a layer of mystery–which sends shivers down my spine. Maybe it’s the short days? If you’re looking for a great winter read, consider that much of Russian literature takes place where there is often snowfall, from War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy to Doctor Zhivago by Boris Pasternak. Back in America, check out the snowy scenes in Winter’s Bone by Daniel Woodrell and an iceberg-cold lake in Housekeeping by Marilynne Robinson. Also known to fill an icy wintery vibe and be slow to unfold are those Scandinavian crime novels from authors such as Stieg Larsson and Jo Nesbø. Snow muffles sound, I’ve noticed, and books set in snow settings are a bit quieter. Whenever it’s snowy, too quiet and I’m alone reading Stieg Larsson, I check to make sure the doors and windows are locked. 

This season it seems appropriate to read or re-read, watch or rewatch A Christmas Carol, the beloved 1843 novella by Charles Dickens. Since it’s Dickens, you can expect that living circumstances are squalid. With few exceptions, there is great difficulty getting by in life, including for Tiny Tim, a child who uses a crutch. He is seen as being symbolic of the consequences of the protagonist’s choices. Our protagonist and well-off miser, Ebenezer Scrooge of Bah! Humbug! fame, scorns openly those who have less:

Merry Christmas! What right have you for being merry? What reason have you to be merry? You’re poor enough.

It is Christmas Eve, and what happens to Scrooge that night is among the greatest stories set in winter. A Christmas Carol is not about a holiday as much as it is about redemption, being for the light and against darkness, and being a good person. It is an inner dialogue you can have with yourself at any time of year. 

This year has a lot in common with Scrooge, who is described by Dickens as:

….squeezing, wrenching, grasping, scraping, clutching, covetous. The cold within him froze his old features, nipped his pointed nose, shriveled his cheek, stiffened his gait; made his eyes red, his thin lips blue; a frosty rime was on his head, and on his eyebrows, and his wiry chin. He carried his own low temperature always about with him; he iced his office in the dog days; and didn’t thaw it one degree at Christmas.

Scrooge and 2020 both give off a stench of sourpuss right up until the end when Scrooge has a reckoning, and one of 2020’s few bright spots is that a Covid vaccine has arrived or will soon. As I write this, today the first person in the Western world has received the vaccine–a 90-year-old British grandmother. In 2021, we can hope for a smooth, efficient roll out of the vaccine in the U.S. 

If you’re looking for A Christmas Carol, the library has a lot to offer. Whether you listen to the audiobook, read it digitally or in the physical book format; or watch one of its many adaptations for television and film over the years, it’s a delight to step away from 2020. Check out physical materials such as these television and film DVDs also.

Many versions have emerged as the story of saving Scrooge’s soul is re-imagined. For example: Scrooged starring Bill Murray, the 1938 film A Christmas Carol (100% on Rotten Tomatoes), the 1970 musical film Scrooge, Blackadder’s Christmas Carol, the 1984 A Christmas Carol starring George C Scott, the 1992 The Muppet Christmas Carol, and on Hoopla, the 1951 B&W classic A Christmas Carol starring Alastair Sim.

This season I plan to re-watch the 1951 film version of A Christmas Carol that I have enjoyed many times, and I’ll read A Christmas Carol using, for the first time, a book I recently came across on a shelf at my apartment. It belonged to my mother, who died 25 years ago this Thanksgiving. The title was long gone from the spine, it was so worn. Her signature was on the inside page in pencil, Erna Mae Lueder. For the season, these two will be a good winter combo for me. What special title–winter or not–will you be reading or watching? 

If you need a few more December books to choose from, perhaps consider these titles: Winter Garden by Kristin Hannah, Cold Mountain by Charles Frazier, Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel, The Child Finder by Rene Denfeld, We Met in December by Rosie Curtis, The Snow Child by Eowyn Ivey, Snow Falling on Cedars by David Guterson, A Week in Winter by Maeve Binchy, The Call of the Wild by Jack London.

At the book club meeting, we will discuss whatever winter books you’ve been reading or read in the past: Dec. 28 at 6pm. 

To join the meeting, you’ll need a phone or a computer with internet access and a browser. No special software is required. Use this link: https://tinyurl.com/y5mhq3bk or call 425-616-3920 and use conference ID 919 910 778#

Books that Give Us Hope

“Have Hope, Stay Strong,” (Other Title, “Hope,”) was created by artist Giancarlo Mancuso and published by Amplifier in Seattle, 2020. Poster (left) shows a collage of illustrated images with a center circle reading: “Honor our heroes–Help fight against COVID-19–Help prevent spread–Stay home for those who can’t.”


Books that give us hope will be the uniting theme and focus of discussion at the next meeting of the library’s virtual book club (Stay Home, Stay Reading) November 23 from 6-7pm. Read any title–fiction or nonfiction–of your choosing inspired by this month’s theme.  

This month read a book that gives you hope. Winter is coming, and November represents the transition to it from the autumnal harvest season. Thanksgiving, a beloved holiday to many, is a day to reap the harvest and celebrate the bounty. Books that give us hope can make the transition to winter less cruel and dark, and remind us not to fear, for spring will follow. 

If you need a few more November books to choose from, perhaps consider these titles:

It’s Not All Downhill from Here by Terry McMillan, fiction. “A close-knit group of 60-something black women deals with loss, illness, addicted family members, and the never-ending challenges of diet and exercise.” –Kirkus Reviews

All Adults Here by Emma Straub, fiction. “….a beach read for when you can’t get to the beach. …Family secrets come soothingly to light.” –Vox.com 

Humans by Brandon Stanton, nonfiction. “Just when we need it, ‘Humans’ reminds us what it means to be human.” –Washington Post

Keep Moving, Notes On Loss, Creativity, and Change by Maggie Smith, nonfiction. Sage insights and advice to return to in times of confusion or loss.

Whether you prefer to read a book in a digital or physical format, options are available through the Everett Public Library. The library not only has eBooks and eAudiobooks, but also physical copies of titles, including audiobooks (on CD), playaways and graphic novels. 

Instead of focusing on a specific book, each month we invite readers to discuss books around a broad theme. Aiming for easy to access and fun, we want to spur on open-ended discussions. Come and go from the meeting when it’s convenient for you. Read a book, don’t read a book. No problem. For those who love to read and exchange views on books (or just sit back and take in the conversation!), join us. You never know when you’ll find your next treasured read, but joining the library’s virtual book club can make it that much easier to do. There is no formal registration. 

If you could use a little help ahead of time to learn how to get connected to the meeting, call the library (425-257-8000 and 425-257-8250), and talk to a librarian who can walk you through the process. You will need a device with audio and video and an Internet connection to participate. Doubleclick on the text “Join Microsoft Teams Meeting” below, and you’re on your way. If you are not comfortable using video, that’s okay! You can still join. Simply call the phone number below and enter the password (conference ID) on your phone and you will be connected. 

Join Microsoft Teams Meeting

+1 425-616-3920   United States, Seattle (Toll)

Conference ID: 919 910 778#

The Everett Public Library hosts a virtual book club meeting on the 4th Monday of the month from 6:00 to 7:00 p.m. through 2020. Our next meeting is December 28. The December theme is Winter–Books that take place during the winter season.

Stay Home, Stay Reading in October

“October’s bright blue weather A good time to read!” Poster for the WPA Statewide Library Project, Chicago : Illinois WPA Art Project (between 1936 and 1940). Looking for a delightful and free source for autumn and Halloween images? Check out the Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division. The selected items are from the Free to use and reuse resource, unless otherwise noted. This set of copyright free pictures features activities and scenery from late September through early November. Check back often! More images are regularly added.

Big book club announcement! We are changing up the how and when of the library’s virtual book club: Stay Home, Stay Reading. Join us for our monthly book discussion October 26 from 6-7 pm hosted digitally by the Everett Public Library. Starting this month, we will be hosting an open book discussion on the 4th Monday of the month from 6:00 to 7:00 p.m. through 2020. You are free to read any title of your choosing. Instead of focusing on a specific book, each month we’ll invite readers to discuss books around a broad theme.

Aiming for easy to access and fun, we want to encourage more open-ended discussions. It can be a good time for the exchange of reading ideas.  

Here are the themes for 2020: 

October 26: The Unexplained 

November 23: Hope–Books that give us hope 

December 28:  Winter–Books that take place during the winter season 

This month’s connecting theme will be “The Unexplained.” Read a fiction or nonfiction title about which the reason for it or cause of it is unclear or is not known.

Does the idea of a spooky story give you chills? Are you interested in a nonfiction title identifying US lakes known for their monsters (including the Winged Alligator-Snake of Lake Chelan)? Perhaps you are more interested in curling up in front of a roaring fire with a mystery surrounding a baffling legend and a hellhound? Whether you want to learn more about ancient past rituals surrounding afterlife preparation or absorb details about the Witches’ Market in La Paz, the literary possibilities are endless. 

If you need a few more October books to choose from, perhaps consider these titles:

These titles are available through the EPL digital catalog. Just reserve an available copy of the ebook (or eAudioBook) and read it instantly using your library card or consider putting a hold on the title, and picking it up at one of our two Curbside Pickup libraries to get your hands on a physical book or audio book (plays CDs). If you have any questions, just ask library staff for more details at 425-257-8000 o 425-257-8250. 

This Thing Called Life

One of the very few good things about these challenging times is the explosion of virtual events that are now available. What you loose in the ability to be ‘in person’ you gain in the sheer number and variety of programs to attend virtually. But how to choose? Let the library be your guide.

Here at Everett Public, we have teamed up with CrowdCast to host many excellent programs. We are especially excited about the program we are hosting on Thursday, Oct. 15th at 6 PM:

This Thing Called Life: Prince’s Odyssey On + Off the Record

Prince remains one of the most mysterious rock icons of all time. In This Thing Called Life: Prince’s Odyssey, On and Off the Record, journalist Neal Karlen explores his unique, decades-long relationship with Prince. Karlen will be joined in conversation with Gregr, the morning host on Seattle’s 107.7 The End alternative music radio station. The audience will be given an unusually intimate peek into superstar Prince’s life, going back to his earliest days. 

Sign up to attend today and enjoy the program on Thursday. If you miss the deadline, never fear. You can view this event, and all our past events as well, from the Everett Public Library CrowdCast page.

If after the program, you feel inspired to learn more about the Purple One, why not browse through our many other books about his life and times? And of course, we have plenty of his music and films as well.

Behind the Scenes at the Library

Ever wonder what it’s like in the library right now, and what staff are doing in the building, behind those closed doors? Here’s a little movie to show you.



It’s actually very quiet without our patrons in the library, and we all look forward to when we can reopen, but you can be sure we are keeping busy at both locations!

Many carts of books checked in and ready to shelve.

Curbside Service has been popular, especially at the Main Library. Last week we determined that over 1200 patrons have taken advantage of this service. You can place books, DVDs, CDs, and audiobooks on hold from our website, or call us at the numbers below and we will be happy to do it for you! Pick up is easy – see all the details here.

Delivering bags of books to a patron

Phone Service has also been steady. Give us a call and we can put library materials on hold for you, help you get ebooks on your device, look up a phone number, suggest a book, research a question, find historical material, etc. If there’s a way for us to do it remotely we will try our hardest to help:

Reference questions: Main Library 425-257-8000 Evergreen Branch 425-257-8250
Account questions: Main Library 425-257-8010 Evergreen Branch 425-257-8260

At the Main Library we can be reached Monday to Friday: 10-6, Saturday: 10-5. At the Evergreen Branch: Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 10-6, Saturday: 10-5



Books for You is a new book matching service that was started recently as a way to quickly get staff-picked books to patrons. There are many different lists that we’ve created; take a look at the web page. Once you’ve chosen a “Books for You” category that interests you, fill out this form or give us a call at 425-257-8000, and we’ll place some books on hold for you!

Kids and teens can participate too! Simply fill out this form to let us know what your child or teen would like, and we’ll handpick items we think they’ll love.  You can also call us at 425-257-8000 to speak to a librarian. For more reading suggestions for kids and teens, visit our What to Read Next page.

You choose the category. We choose the books!

Summer Reading is in full swing. Read 24 hours and earn a new book! Prizes will be available starting in mid-August. Visit the Summer Reading page to print out reading logs, or ask for one when you come by for a curbside pickup.

Summer Reading Logo, Imagine your story, Thank you to our sponsor - Friends of the Everett Public Li

Storytimes are recorded and generally posted three times a week. Watch for them on our Facebook page, or click here to see our available previously recorded storyimes Join in the fun with Miss Andrea, Miss Leslie, Miss Emily, and Miss Eileen!


Online Program for Adults:

The Northwest Room at Home video series examines local history in a number of ways. Check out “Digitizing the Juleen Panoramas“, the most recent video.


The Stay Home, Stay Healthy Virtual book club meetings through Microsoft Teams have just begun. The next session is on August 22nd, and the book is Miracle Creek by Angie Kim.

Presentations on job searching skills and resources took place on Facebook weekly through July, and the recordings can all be viewed at epls.org/jobseeker. Starting soon in August, look for a series on entrepreneurial skills and resources to help people start their own businesses.

Grow Your Jobseeking Skills


Create @ Home recorded DIY arts and crafts videos have been posted monthly during this time. This week’s episode is on how to make “hypertufa’ flower pots – a type of lighter weight cement material – from a mixture of ingredients.


Behind the scenes down in technical services, selecting, ordering, receiving, cataloging, and labeling new materials have continued throughout the time the library has been closed. To see what’s been ordered, take a look at the new fiction, nonficiton, DVD and children’s books lists. All on order items can be found in the catalog.

Website improvements have been ongoing, as we try to provide the most needed information such as COVID-19 updates and job searching resources front and center.


Repairing and Re-configuring – While we are closed, we will be renewing, repairing, and replacing some service desks, and adding features to increase the safety of patrons and staff when we can reopen.


Library staff are used to helping people in all sorts of ways, so it certainly does not feel the same without you, but at least we can see you for curbside pickups, and talk to you over the phone. Libraries will be allowed to reopen in a limited fashion in Phase 3, so we have to get there first. We hope that day comes soon.

The library fish miss you too!

Tayari Jones coming to Everett

This weekend, there is an outstanding library sponsored event that we here at A Reading Life had to let you know about. This Saturday, February 15th, Tayari Jones will be at the Everett Performing Arts Center starting at 7 pm to talk about her award wining novel, An American Marriage.

This novel is a moving portrayal of the effects of a wrongful conviction on a young couple. Newlyweds Celestial and Roy are standing on the threshold of the American dream when Roy is arrested and imprisoned for a crime he didn’t commit, and their lives implode.

In addition to a great plot, An American Marriage has received much praise and many accolades. It was named a notable book by The New York Times and The Washington Post and was awarded the Women’s Prize for Fiction, the Aspen Words Prize, and an NAACP Image Award for Outstanding Literary Work in Fiction. It has been published in over 20 countries, with more than 700,000 copies in print domestically. It was selected as a 2018 Oprah  Book Club pick, a summer reading list pick by Barack Obama, and one Bill Gates’ top five books of 2019.

So join us this weekend for an excellent and thought provoking program. No registration is required and copies of the book will be available for sale and signing following the presentation.

Everett Reads Sy Montgomery

Are you ready to take a walk on the wild side at the library? I’m super-excited to share that we’re bringing acclaimed naturalist and author Sy Montgomery to town in February. Yes, really! I am totally chair-dancing while I type this. Sy will be our featured speaker for Everett Reads!, the library’s annual community reading program. This year the program is dedicated to an exploration of all things animal and I am so here for it.

Sy Montgomery has been chased by a silverback gorilla, embraced by a Giant Pacific Octopus, and undressed by an orangutan. Can you even? Learn about Montgomery’s amazing animal adventures and explore the connection between humans and animals throughout the month of February.

Sy Montgomery will offer two free events for the public. The first event, on Saturday, Feb. 9 at 7 p.m., will take place at the Everett Performing Arts Center at 2710 Wetmore Ave. in Everett. Books will be for sale and available for signing following the lecture during a free reception hosted by the Friends of Everett Public Library.

Side note. Our Friends are really rad and deserve their own shout-out. They make a lot of magic happen for us all year round but they really shine whenever Everett Reads! rolls around. Thanks, Friends, for all you do! If you want to get involved with the Friends of the Library you can find more information here.

Okay, back to our programming lineup. Children and their families are invited to a special presentation with Sy on Sunday, Feb. 10, at 11 a.m. at the Cope-Gillette Theater at 2730 Wetmore Ave. in Everett. Children’s books will be available for sale and signing following the talk.

But wait, there’s more! In addition to these programs on February 9 & 10, we will be presenting a range of animal-themed programs all month. On the library’s website you can check out the entire programming lineup–which includes book discussions, an art class for adults, and kids’ programs that’ll feature over 2,000 insect specimens. There’s really something here for everyone.

And speaking of something for everyone, we’ve stocked up on books by Sy Montgomery so you can take your pick–or read them all! Sy’s books are a great way to explore the connections between humans and animals and how we can live together better. Click a book cover to read more on each title and place a hold.

    

  

So what are you waiting for? Grab a book or five and make plans to share your reading adventure with friends and neighbors at some of February’s Everett Reads! events. And don’t forget to make plans to meet Sy in person. I’ll see you there!

Every Day is Black Friday at the Library

Black Friday is every day in the lobby of the Main Library where we have a book sale where most items cost either 25 cents (hardback books) or 10 cents (magazines, paperbacks). But, wait, there’s more: We even have CDs for $1 and sometimes recorded books on CD for $2.00.

Items in the book sale are primarily from the library’s collection and were discarded for a variety of reasons, but many are donated and in pristine condition. Several patrons come in often to peruse what’s on the sale shelves because they know things are added daily. Boxes are available for those who get carried away because the prices are so cheap.

Here I do have to tell you that the library isn’t actually open on the traditional black Friday, November 23rd, as it’s a city holiday. But we’ll be open the next day.

Besides the bargain book sale, library card holders get the gift of over 60 free digital magazine subscriptions which can be accessed at any time. Technically the library is the subscriber, but  with your library card you can download the current issue (and back issues) of titles like Wired, Runner’s World, Vogue, Bicycling, Bon Appetit, Outside, The New Yorker, Sail, Fine Cooking, Fine Woodworking, Fine Homebuilding, Dwell, Brides, The Atlantic, Cosmopolitan, Digital Photo Pro, Backpacker, Saveur, Rolling Stone, PC World, People, and National Geographic.

And, there’s over 30 more magazine titles available. Scroll through the covers of all the current issues available for download through Flipster.  If you need some assistance with downloading magazines to your tablet, phone or other device, you can book a 30 or 60 minute appointment with a librarian. We’re always here to help!

Northwest Rocks!

The Pacific Northwest is filled with brilliant musicians who create spectacular albums. Some of those albums find their way into the Everett Public Library local music collection. And on Saturday, September 15 at 2:00 pm, I will present a talk on some of those local musicians.

But wait, there’s more!

After the presentation, Everett’s own Oliver Elf Army will play some rock and roll tunes that shock and assault the senses. In a good way. And there will be much rejoicing.

“So,” you might say to the version of me that lives in your head, “what can I expect at this so-called talk?” Wellsir, we will delve into the history of northwest rock, attack the ever-present confusion surrounding genre definitions and witness interesting (and perhaps boring) stories about local musicians. But perhaps most importantly, we will listen to snippets of songs by various northwest artists.

Here is a preview of some of the groups that will be discussed. They appear here more or less chronologically, with a nod to their approximate genres.

Prepare to behold the instrumentals of The Frantics, garage rock from The Sonics and early local punk from The Accident.

Group1

Thrill to the power pop of Seattle’s The Heats, proto-grunge from the U-Men and the dawn of riot grrrl punk from Olympia’s Bikini Kill.

Group2

Bow down to the experimental offerings of Anacortes’s Mount Eerie, to the post-punk brilliance of Seattle’s Blackouts and to the wide open spaces of Nevada Backwards and their dark country musings.

Group3

Need a breather? There is no time for breathers! Behold the majesty of your northwest heritage!

Prepare to be aurally assaulted by the heavy, heavy sound of Montesano’s own Melvins, get down to the dark cabaret of Bellingham’s Pirates R Us and swing, yes swing, to the rockabilly of Seattle’s Hard Money Saints.

Group4

Dance like a dancer to the synth pop of Seattle’s Perfume Genius, foxtrot to the old-timey swing of Bellingham’s Birch Pereira and the Gin Joints and boogaloo to some raucous garage rock with Bellingham’s Clambake.

Group5

What of Everett, you say? Pogo with Sleepover Club, get blue with Ryan LaPlante and go electronic with goawaysun.

Group7

And finally, weighing in at 325 pounds, Everett’s own Oliver Elf Army will present their brand of sinister pop in a live performance.

Oliver

 But wait! We got books:

GroupB1

GroupB2

We got DVDs!

GroupD1

We even got audio books!

AudioBook

So come see what’s happening with local music at the Everett Public Library. In the words of The Presidents of the United States of America:

It’s gonna blow… Volcano!