About Linda S.

I have been with the library since 1996 and look forward to blogging for many years to come! I enjoy trivia, writing, reading, knitting, crocheting and other crafts. Also TALKING.... and sharing information. My blog has been perfect for me!

Soon by Lois Murphy

One day, in the novel Soon by Lois Murphy, a mist comes to the little town of Nebulah…. The birds and animals are gone. The town residents try to go on with their lives as usual, until it begins to get dark; everyone runs to the safety of being indoors with every window and door locked, the shades drawn and music or TV turned up loud. Pete, Milly and Li are our three main characters and they all gather to spend the long nights together, and keep each other distracted from the things that come out in the mist.

People in the surrounding towns think that the residents of Nebulah are all crazy, and they don’t believe the things they have been told about the mist. Still, none of them will come to the town at night to try and disprove the rumors either.

When something happens to Li, one of her relatives, Alice, comes to take care of her things. She insists on staying, and when Pete and Milly are unable to convince her to leave, things really get interesting. Alice has an unusual experience with the mist and they can’t persuade her it was a trick.

I think anyone who enjoys suspense will love this book. It was quite a page turner by the end, and the ending was my favorite kind – – one you never saw coming!

Tidelands by Philippa Gregory

I really enjoyed Tidelands by Philippa Gregory. While technically a work of fiction, it is a compelling story and feels true to the time period. Philippa is such a fabulous writer and her research is impeccable.

In the year 1648 people were very superstitious. Alinor is descended from a long line of wise women and has attended the births of most of the women on Sealsea Island, off the coast of the county of Sussex, England. Knowing the craft of healing and herbs is considered akin to being a witch. Alinor’s abusive husband has disappeared (not that she misses him!) and the townsfolk wonder if she had a part in his disappearance. Alinor’s daughter Alys and son Rob know they must be very careful and help promote a wholesome image to protect her reputation.

Sealsea Island is very small and when the tide comes in or out, the whole island can change, becoming murky, swampy and very unsafe and unstable in places…

There is a war going on in England and King Charles I is being held prisoner. Later, he is tried for treason. Alinor meets James, a priest trying to help King Charles, and a secret, forbidden romance begins. In the meantime, Alys becomes engaged to a boy who is considered above her station, much to the boy’s parents chagrin.

I was enraptured with the characters of Tidelands and couldn’t wait to find out how the dramas all worked out. Of course, one hopes for happy endings all around, but there are some twists that make for a denouement you will not be expecting!

Did You Know? (Penal Colony Edition)

That penal comes from the Latin word for pain?

Poenalis means pain or penalty in Latin. The use of the word to mean “appointed as a place of punishment” began in the mid-19th century according to The Oxford Dictionary of Word Histories.

Turns out, there were penal colonies all over the world. Frequently the prisoner’s family was sent with them. It wasn’t like a prison term: serving your time and going home. Being sent to a penal colony typically meant being sent away for the rest of your life. It didn’t matter how petty or serious the crime happened to be. Many prisoners were sent away due to their political views.

Australia is one of the best known former penal colonies. A Commonwealth of Thieves: the Improbable Birth of Australia by historian/novelist Thomas Keneally talks about the beginnings of the penal colonies in Australia. This book is based on the personal journals and documents of those involved. England shipped their ‘criminals’ there, and just like that, England was rid of their ‘problems!’ The thousands of convicts’ journeys were just the beginning of their ordeal though, as they started new lives in this unknown land.

The House of the Dead: Siberian Exile Under the Tsars by Daniel Beer is a story of the Tsars and how they exiled prisoners to the Ural mountains of Siberia. It is also the tale of how these exiled unruly criminals became revolutionaries who would one day rule the Soviet Union.

Gould’s Book of Fish: A Novel in Twelve Fish by Richard Flanagan is a fictional story about William Buelow Gould being sentenced to life imprisonment at the Sarah Island penal colony in what is now Tasmania. William is a talented art forger and he begins painting pictures of fish to help the prison doctor get into The Royal Society. But the tales are as much about life on the island as they are about his art and the fish.

It can be devastating for a family that is left behind when a member of that family is in prison. The Night Dad Went to Jail by Melissa Higgins is a very useful book for young children with a parent in jail. They need to be reassured that it is not their fault and their parent still loves them. 65% of men in prisons are fathers and 75% of incarcerated women are mothers.

All of these penal colonies and jails are meant to punish. We know that positive discipline and boundaries are a much more desirable way to reap good behavior. Raising Respectful Children in a Disrespectful World by Jill Rigby is full of wonderful anecdotes/scenarios demonstrating healthy ways to deal with tough situations when raising a child. Here at the library we have a wide array of parenting books to help you if you have specific discipline issues that you need to deal with. Hopefully, none of us will have to worry about our loved ones being put in jail!

Did You Know? (Hotcake Edition)

That the difference between pancakes, griddlecakes, johnnycakes and hotcakes depends mostly on if they are made with flour or corn meal?

In researching for this blog, every time I thought I had it figured out I’d find another recipe that contradicted it! Mostly from what I’ve seen, pancakes and johnnycakes (more about them below) are made with corn meal and griddlecakes and hotcakes are made from flour. That excludes buckwheat pancakes which are made with buckwheat, which is also known as Kasha.

Buckwheat, with its origins in China, was produced in Europe in the 1900s and was used in traditional crêpes (pancakes) and galettes (flat cakes) according to The Story of Food (page 239) from DK publishing.

In the UK, flapjacks are made out of sugar, butter, oats, and honey, but in the US, they are synonymous with hotcakes.

I think pretty much anywhere in the world you will find some version of hotcakes. Some are sweet and others are savory. Some are topped and others are filled. Here is a list of a few of the options:

Asian nonya spring roll pancakes

Brazil’s panqueca de carne moida are meat-filled crêpes.

Chinese bao bing (a thin pancake)

Dutch poffertjes (made with a yeast-raised recipe)

French crêpes (crêpes is French for pancake)

Korean hotteok sweet stuffed pancakes

Korean seafood pancakes are reminiscent of egg foo young.

German pfannkuchen (crêpe)

Hungarian palacsinta (crêpe)

Japanese okonomiyaki is the savory, saucy single pancake meal of your dreams.

Nigerian diet are gorgeous, spicy, chewy pancakes.

Spanish panqueques rely on fluffy whipped egg whites to make them incredibly light. (crepe)

Thai roti cooked with egg and drizzled with sweetened condensed milk. Thai roti are folded over and over to get beautiful layers when you bite into it. It looks like baklava.

Vietnamese Bánh Khot are tiny, crispy, savory seafood pancakes that are perfect two-bite morsels.

The website What’s Cooking America has a great article all about johnnycakes. They are made with cornmeal and are the New England equivalent of tortillas. They are known under a variety of names: Johnnycakes, johnny cakes, jonnycake, ashcake, battercake, corn cake, cornpone, hoecake, hoe cake, journey cake, mush bread, pone, Shawnee cake, jonakin, and jonikin. They are all regional names for this cornmeal flatbread.

The origin of the name johnnycakes is something of a mystery and probably has nothing to do with the name John. They were also called journey cakes because they could be carried on long trips in saddlebags and baked along the way. Historians also think that “janiken,” a Native American word that means “corncake,” could possibly be the origin.

Waffles, Crêpes and Pancakes by Norma Miller has all kinds of recipes for the titled items. I can’t wait to try the Tiramisu Pancakes!

Paul Bunyan Swings his Ax by Dell J. McCormic has a story about Paul Bunyan’s logging camp and the 10-acre griddle used to make hot griddlecakes so large that it took 5 men to eat one!

So the next time you are having a short stack, think about all the different things people call them, and the fact that around the world there are probably thousands of people eating a hotcake right now.

The Chain by Adrian McKinty

The Chain by Adrian Mckinty is the kind of book I find very frightening. No zombies or vampires, but the kind of stuff that can REALLY happen!

With a regular chain letter, if you don’t pass it on either something “bad” will happen or you are promised great things if you do pass it on; but there is no real incentive to pass it on. In this story, the masterminds behind the chain letter make sure that something really bad happens and in order to make it better you must “pass it on.”

Imagine that you get a phone call saying your child has been kidnapped. In order to get your child back, you must pay a ransom and kidnap another child! Only after the parents of the child you kidnap pay the ransom and kidnap another child will you get your own child back. And that’s where it ends…..or does it?

After contacting past abductees families, Rachel realizes that her family will forever be part of the chain, unless she can find a way to keep herself and her family safe.

Read this exciting story of single parent Rachel and her daughter Kylie. Rachel’s brother-in-law helps her do the bad deeds she needs to do to get Kylie back, because, obviously, you cannot go to the police. As they end up getting deeper and deeper into the kidnapping they realize that even if they wanted to go to the police, they are now criminals. This tale becomes even more exciting as they try to not just break the chain, but take it apart link by link.

I must add that I was very disappointed that I took this to read on my three-week vacation…. as I couldn’t put it down and finished it in four days!

The Last List of Miss Judith Kratt

In The Last List of Miss Judith Kratt by Andrea Bobotis, Miss Judith Kratt is getting old…. and decides it is time to take an inventory of the belongings in her home. She still lives in the house she grew up in (located in Bound, South Carolina) with Olva, her dearest friend. Daddy Kratt owned the local mercantile where many of the items on her inventory originated, and the townspeople both revered and feared him.

If a picture is worth a thousand words, every item in the house has a history behind it worth many thousands of words. As Judith makes the list, she tells the stories of the items and the memories that intertwine between the store, the employees (namely Charlie), and the house and family.

Her brother Quincy, Daddy Kratt, Olva, her mother, and sister Rosemarie all have large parts to play in the tales. Miss Judith thought that she knew them all. After years of separation from the family, however, Rosemarie comes back and we all find out that things were not as they seemed.

This is a great book to read if you like to find out secrets. There were twists that I didn’t see coming until the very end. Who knew a Tiffany lamp could have such an impact on a family!

Did You Know? (Breathing Edition)

That softshell turtles can breathe through their bottom?

Turtles have a cloaca. It is an orifice on their bodies that they urinate, defecate, lay eggs, and (in some species) can absorb oxygen from. While it is not their main way of breathing, it helps while they are eating, laying eggs and especially when they are submerged for extended periods of time.I found this information on page 151 of The Totally Awesome Book of Useless Information by Noel Botham.

You will learn more details about this ability on page 208 of Turtles, Tortoises and Terrapins by Ronald Orenstein. He also tells us there are about 30 breeds of soft shell turtles. One example is the Fitzroy River Turtle which lives in fast running water where it can remain submerged for days, or even weeks at a time. Mr. Orenstein’s book has wonderful photographs of all aspects of these amazing animals. It also explains the differences between turtles, including the different ways they pull their heads into their shells: the Pleurodira, which translates to “side neck”, fold their necks sideways while the Cryptodira, known as hidden-necked turtles,pull their heads straight back into their shell.

Sea turtles can be amazingly large. A sea turtle can weigh as much as a water buffalo! Mission Sea Turtle Rescue by Karen Romano Young is full of fun facts, photos and valuable information about conserving the species. This is a must read for anyone planning on vacationing near a tropical beach. Another great book is Sea Turtles by James R. Spotila.

Turtles aren’t the only ones with shells! Shell by Alex Arthur tells about all kinds of shells: sea shells, egg shells, fossilized shells and many others are all in this book.

Lastly, turtles “cry.” This is their way of forcing the extra salt from their bodies that they ingest from drinking sea water. I don’t think that “turtle tears” will catch on nearly as well as “crocodile tears” but who knows?