About Linda S.

I have been with the library since 1996 and look forward to blogging for many years to come! I enjoy trivia, writing, reading, knitting, crocheting and other crafts. Also TALKING.... and sharing information. My blog has been perfect for me!

Processed Cheese by Stephen Wright

Wow! Stephen Wright has a way with words!

People’s names: Graveyard, MisterMenu, Ambience, SideEffects, Carousel, Roulette, LemonChiffon, CarnyDoll, CyberLawn, CartWheel, and FancyPants

Places: House of Sweet Delay (perfume store), GutterBalm (makeup store), AlleyOops (clothing store), TooGoodForYou (the up-town shopping district), BurnishMe Island (vacation spot)

These are just a few examples of the unusual names of people and places in Wright’s new book Processed Cheese. They made it really fun to read.

Basically, the story starts with the character Graveyard walking home and a bag of money falling from the sky. He and his wife Ambience go on a spending spree (I mean really, wouldn’t you?) and eventually MisterMenu traces the bag of money his wife threw from his high-rise window to Graveyard and tries to get it back…

It was entertaining to see the lengths that MisterMenu went to try and get it back, and the extremes that Graveyard goes to avoid him.

Does he get the money back or not? You will have to read this astonishing book to find out!

Did You Know? (Seahorse Edition)

The seahorse is the only male animal that can get pregnant?

I found that interesting fact in Project Seahorse by Pamela S Turner on pages 13-15. I was delighted that there was so much information about seahorses in this book; as they have always been one of my favorites at the aquarium. Ms. Turner also tells us about the studies being done to help preserve seahorse populations.

Eric Carle’s book Mister Seahorse is beautifully written with wonderful artwork. It’s the story of Mister Seahorse with his pouch full of babies talking to all the other fish dads who are also taking care of their eggs until they hatch.

Seahorses and Sea Dragons by Mary Jo Rhodes and David Hall has a lot of information and pictures. I was surprised to learn that sea dragons are typically much larger and don’t have the pouch that sea horses do. Instead, sea dragons have a ‘brood patch’ that the eggs attach to.

There are seahorses and sea dragons with the most common difference between them being the longer nose of the sea dragon. You can use the books How to Draw Horses and Ponies by Peter Gray and Draw Dragons and Other Fantasy Beasts by Gary Spencer Millidge and James McKay to invent your own creatures!

Animal reproduction is a mysterious thing. Read more about how other animals take care of their offspring in My Encyclopedia of Baby Animals by Emmanuelle Figueras. You’ll find several examples of males that take care of their eggs: the midwife toad that carries the eggs on his back, the cardinal fish that carries them in his mouth, and the emperor penguin who protects the egg until it hatches, just to name a few!

And lastly, unless you can hold your breath a really long time (and shrink yourself!) I wouldn’t recommend trying to ride a seahorse, but, you can learn all about horses and how to ride them in The Complete Book of Horses: Breeds, Care, Riding, Saddlery: a Comprehensive Encyclopedia of Horse Breeds and Practical Riding Techniques with 1500 Photographs by Debbie Sly.

Did You Know? (Hippopotamus Edition)

That hippo ‘sweat’ is red-orange and acts as an antibiotic and sunscreen?

I found this information on page 20 of Hippopotamus by Patricia Whitehouse, part of the Read and Learn series. It states that hippos can get sunburned and they have a red oil on their skin to keep them from burning in the sun. In fact, this is not sweat, but a reddish oil that comes from glands all over their skin. It is commonly referred to as ‘blood sweat,’ even though it isn’t blood either.

Other animals have their own ways of protecting themselves from the sun. “Elephants will throw sand on their backs and on their head. They do that to keep them from getting sunburned and to keep bugs off,” says Tony Barthel, curator of the Elephant House and the Cheetah Conservation Station at Smithsonian’s National Zoo. “They also douse their young with sand. That is probably part of the teaching process,” he adds. “Not only are they taking care of their youngsters, but they are showing them that they need to do that.” Adult elephants will also create shade for their young by standing over them while they sleep. Rhinos and pigs wallow and coat themselves in mud, which protects them from the sun and helps to keep moisture in their skin.

It seems odd that hippos would have to keep moisture in their skin, since they spend so much time in the water, but they dry out very quickly on land. Also, they spend all that time in the water, and they can’t even swim! Hippos walk on the bottom and push off from the riverbed to come up to breathe. Hippos Can’t Swim by Laura Lyn DiSiena and Hannah Elliot is full of fun animal facts like that.

The Great Rift: Africa’s Greatest Story on DVD from BBC Earth has some phenomenal footage of hippos (and many other animals) in their natural habitats. An amazing show for the whole family.

No wonder hippos have ‘built in’ sunscreen. They live in Africa, where it is very hot and the sun blazes. Wouldn’t it be nice if we humans had that to? But humans need to apply their own sun screen. Heal Your Skin by Ava Shamban tell us about the best things for our skin. She explains the difference between sun screen and sun block, and about UVA and UVB rays as well as what the SPF ratings mean.

Sun is not the only worry that animals have. Saving the hippos and other large animals in Africa (specifically in Gorangosa Park) is something environmentalists have been working on for generations. White Man’s Game: Saving Animals, Rebuilding Eden, and Other Myths of Conservation in Africa by Stephanie Hanes probes the often troubling implications of well-meaning Western aid projects for animals. She demonstrates how there are few solutions without vexing consequences. Consequences that affect both people and animals directly.

Did You Know? (Banana Edition)

That botanically bananas are considered an herb?

I found this information on page 120 in the book The Story of Food. It is a very fun title about many of the common foods we eat. Touted as “an illustrated history of everything we eat,” there are old photos of harvesting, ad campaigns and artwork for most of the foods discussed.

Banana: The Fate of the Fruit That Changed the World by Dan Koeppel tells us that the genetics of most of the bananas we eat are the same, and how the ‘banana belt’ came to be. He also writes about diseases that threaten banana crops and what is being done to solve the problems. There have been a lot of politics involved in the farming and shipping of this beloved fruit through the years!

For an easier read, The Biography of Bananas by Rachel Eagen has easy to understand facts with lots of pictures, telling you everything you ever wanted to know about bananas but were afraid to ask.

The Banana-Leaf Ball by Katie Smith Milway is an inspiring story about a boy name Deo and his family who are forced to leave their home. They become separated and Deo ends up in a refugee camp in Tanzania. Playing soccer joins the children of the camp together, and Deo teaches the other boys to make banana leaf (soccer) balls.

Even though the banana is an herb, I wasn’t able to find it listed in any of our herb books. Perhaps because it will not grow here. The Encyclopedia of Herbs by Arthur O. Tucker and Thomas DeBaggio lists over 500 types of herbs, uses for them (edible, medicinal etc.), and growing tips. There are sketches of many of the plants as well.

Lastly, an herb you can’t eat, drink or use as medicine…. Herb Alpert & the Tijuana Brass is available at the library on our streaming Hoopla music, or we have several of his CDs. I’m sure, even though you may think you have never heard of the band, as soon as you listen to their music you’ll say “Oh! I’ve heard that before!” Perhaps, you were even eating a banana at the time!

Did You Know? (Brain Sand Edition)

That your pineal gland produces tiny gritty bone particles that are called ‘brain sand?’

I found this on page 12 in the book A World of Information by James Brown and Richard Platt. If I was going to have just one reference book, this would be it! Planets, anatomy, music, morse code, roman numerals etc, etc. are all in here. Perfect for answering all the questions kids (and adults) have. Descartes and others wrote of the pineal gland (which is pine cone shaped) with great reverence. It has been called the seat of the soul and referred to as the ‘third eye.’ It is a split pea sized endocrine gland located in the geometric center of the brain, and it gathers an increasing amount of mineral deposits or ‘brain sand’ as you age.

It appears that the Freemasons and other secret societies have referred to the awakened pineal gland as the Philosopher’s Stone. The Source Field by David Wilcock talks all about this and the symbolism of pine cones through out history.

Becoming Supernatural by Dr. Joe Dispenza tells us about the pineal gland, energies in your body, brain chemistry, your bodies’ electrical fields, the movement of cerebrospinal fluid, heart rhythm patterns and much more. He describes how the pineal gland works with adrenal hormones, melatonin, and serotonin. According to the author, it is your bodies’ energy center. This revolutionary book is touted as a “body of knowledge and a set of tools that allow ordinary people … to reach extraordinary states of being.” I’ll admit, I just kind of skipped around and read bits of it. It seemed to me rather technical, but Dr. Dispenza made it fairly easy to understand, in spite of all the big words!

For children, or for those of us with an aversion to big words, the Ultimate Body-pedia by Christina Wilson has excellent pictures of the body and all of its systems, including the endocrine system showing. It also explains all of the glands in the body, including the pineal gland.

Imagine how much brain sand it would take to fill a beach. I think I’d rather just have regular sand on my beach! Two fun stories featuring beach sand are Pig Kahuna Pirates by Jennifer Sattler where Fergus and little brother Dink make a sand castle pirate ship, and If You Ever Want to Bring a Piano to the Beach, DON’T by Elise Parsley. Parsley’s book is a cute story telling the dangers of having your piano at the beach.

And then, there is quicksand! Quicksand is a colloid hydrogel consisting of fine granular material (such as sand or silt), clay, and water. Quicksand forms in saturated loose sand when the sand is suddenly agitated. When water in the sand cannot escape, it creates a liquefied soil that loses strength and cannot support weight. Quicksand can form in standing water or in upward flowing water (as from an artesian spring).

Finally, there is the novel Quicksand by Malin Persson Giolito which is touted as the Best Swedish Crime Novel of the year for 2016. Maja and Sebastian have a ‘relationship.’ A mass murder shooting occurs at the high school they attend and Maja is one of the few people to survive. She is accused of pulling the trigger for some of the murders, but this gripping story will make you wonder if she was really to blame. Maja finds herself sinking as if in quicksand as the trial goes on. Hmmmmm….. Maybe her glands made her do it?

Soon by Lois Murphy

One day, in the novel Soon by Lois Murphy, a mist comes to the little town of Nebulah…. The birds and animals are gone. The town residents try to go on with their lives as usual, until it begins to get dark; everyone runs to the safety of being indoors with every window and door locked, the shades drawn and music or TV turned up loud. Pete, Milly and Li are our three main characters and they all gather to spend the long nights together, and keep each other distracted from the things that come out in the mist.

People in the surrounding towns think that the residents of Nebulah are all crazy, and they don’t believe the things they have been told about the mist. Still, none of them will come to the town at night to try and disprove the rumors either.

When something happens to Li, one of her relatives, Alice, comes to take care of her things. She insists on staying, and when Pete and Milly are unable to convince her to leave, things really get interesting. Alice has an unusual experience with the mist and they can’t persuade her it was a trick.

I think anyone who enjoys suspense will love this book. It was quite a page turner by the end, and the ending was my favorite kind – – one you never saw coming!

Tidelands by Philippa Gregory

I really enjoyed Tidelands by Philippa Gregory. While technically a work of fiction, it is a compelling story and feels true to the time period. Philippa is such a fabulous writer and her research is impeccable.

In the year 1648 people were very superstitious. Alinor is descended from a long line of wise women and has attended the births of most of the women on Sealsea Island, off the coast of the county of Sussex, England. Knowing the craft of healing and herbs is considered akin to being a witch. Alinor’s abusive husband has disappeared (not that she misses him!) and the townsfolk wonder if she had a part in his disappearance. Alinor’s daughter Alys and son Rob know they must be very careful and help promote a wholesome image to protect her reputation.

Sealsea Island is very small and when the tide comes in or out, the whole island can change, becoming murky, swampy and very unsafe and unstable in places…

There is a war going on in England and King Charles I is being held prisoner. Later, he is tried for treason. Alinor meets James, a priest trying to help King Charles, and a secret, forbidden romance begins. In the meantime, Alys becomes engaged to a boy who is considered above her station, much to the boy’s parents chagrin.

I was enraptured with the characters of Tidelands and couldn’t wait to find out how the dramas all worked out. Of course, one hopes for happy endings all around, but there are some twists that make for a denouement you will not be expecting!