Explore our eLibrary

Most local libraries offer a good selection of digital books, movies, and music, as well as research and other databases for learning, business, auto repair, etc. Everett Public Library is no exception. We spend a lot of time, and frankly, money, subscribing to these quality resources for the community to use. Unfortunately, this library collection can sometimes be one of the least visible.

Here’s a short video to show you how to navigate to EPL’s eLibrary and full list of databases.

If you watched the video you may have noticed that there was much more in the A-Z list that was not mentioned, so make sure to check out the whole list here. Below are a few highlights of the many resources to which the library provides access, both research and entertainment focused.

Northwest Room digital content can help you find historic photos, research property history, or even reminisce over photos of your old classmates in Everett High’s “Nesika” yearbooks. Some of the photography collections, such as the Juleen studio collection, are amazing records of Everett’s history, both in terms of the places and the people. Staff adds new material to these online collections regularly; check out Northwest Room Historian Lisa’s recent video tour of the Juleen panoramas, which are in the process of being digitized.

Brue Building school with children, 3410 Everett Avenue, Everett, Washington, 1892. From the King and Baskerville Collection. Building still stands today.

Online learning
Lynda.com offers a wide variety of expert-taught courses on topics including photography, business/management training, web design, graphic design, computer coding, and much more! Learning Express, GCF Free Learn, and Khan Academy are other good sources for tests, training, and skills development.

Genealogy Research
Did you know Ancestry.com is currently available from home? In normal times this popular genealogy resource is only accessible at the library, so if you’ve been thinking about starting to research your family roots, now is a great time to try it out.

In Novelist Plus, you can search among hundreds of thousands of popular fiction and readable nonfiction titles, and also retrieve author read-alikes, book lists, book discussion guides, and more. All of this rich editorial content is crafted by librarians and reading authorities who are experts in the field.Learn more in this Reading Life blog post, Know About Novelist?


Magazines through Overdrive/Libby
Many of our patrons know and love the Libby (by Overdrive) app for e-books and e-audiobooks, but did you know there are magazines available as well? Check out this video made for us by Overdrive staff, to show you how to find magazines from the app. Speaking of apps for library content and resources, you can find all of them here.

Music: http://www.bensound.com

Ebooks and e-audiobooks are available from both Overdrive and cloudLibrary. Each collection has different titles available, so make sure to search both, or use the catalog and limit to ebooks to see all in one place. CloudLibrary often has fewer holds on popular items, probably because people are used to only searching in the Libby app, so do check it out and give it a try. The app is easy to use!

Creativebug, has been featured in a few blogs posts: Summer Sewing and Homemade relief for your dry hands? Yes, please!. It’s a great place to look for arts and crafts classes and projects from quick crafts to month-long series.

Creativebug’s Make Tissue Paper Pompoms is an easy project that brings so much festivity, color, and joy to a room, and all you need is tissue paper, wire, scissors, and string.

Movies and Music: Hoopla and Kanopy

Hoopla offers movies, music, audiobooks, ebooks, comics and TV shows to enjoy on your computer, tablet, or phone – and even your TV! With no waiting, titles can be streamed immediately, or downloaded to phones or tablets for offline enjoyment later.

Kanopy streams thoughtful entertainment to your preferred device with no fees and no commercials by partnering with public libraries. Everyone from film scholars to casual viewers will discover remarkable and enriching films on Kanopy. Log in with your library membership and enjoy the diverse catalog with new titles added every month.

Until we can open our doors again and welcome back our patrons, we hope you find entertainment and education in EPL’s eLibrary.


Behind the Scenes at the Library

Ever wonder what it’s like in the library right now, and what staff are doing in the building, behind those closed doors? Here’s a little movie to show you.



It’s actually very quiet without our patrons in the library, and we all look forward to when we can reopen, but you can be sure we are keeping busy at both locations!

Many carts of books checked in and ready to shelve.

Curbside Service has been popular, especially at the Main Library. Last week we determined that over 1200 patrons have taken advantage of this service. You can place books, DVDs, CDs, and audiobooks on hold from our website, or call us at the numbers below and we will be happy to do it for you! Pick up is easy – see all the details here.

Delivering bags of books to a patron

Phone Service has also been steady. Give us a call and we can put library materials on hold for you, help you get ebooks on your device, look up a phone number, suggest a book, research a question, find historical material, etc. If there’s a way for us to do it remotely we will try our hardest to help:

Reference questions: Main Library 425-257-8000 Evergreen Branch 425-257-8250
Account questions: Main Library 425-257-8010 Evergreen Branch 425-257-8260

At the Main Library we can be reached Monday to Friday: 10-6, Saturday: 10-5. At the Evergreen Branch: Monday, Wednesday, Friday: 10-6, Saturday: 10-5



Books for You is a new book matching service that was started recently as a way to quickly get staff-picked books to patrons. There are many different lists that we’ve created; take a look at the web page. Once you’ve chosen a “Books for You” category that interests you, fill out this form or give us a call at 425-257-8000, and we’ll place some books on hold for you!

Kids and teens can participate too! Simply fill out this form to let us know what your child or teen would like, and we’ll handpick items we think they’ll love.  You can also call us at 425-257-8000 to speak to a librarian. For more reading suggestions for kids and teens, visit our What to Read Next page.

You choose the category. We choose the books!

Summer Reading is in full swing. Read 24 hours and earn a new book! Prizes will be available starting in mid-August. Visit the Summer Reading page to print out reading logs, or ask for one when you come by for a curbside pickup.

Summer Reading Logo, Imagine your story, Thank you to our sponsor - Friends of the Everett Public Li

Storytimes are recorded and generally posted three times a week. Watch for them on our Facebook page, or click here to see our available previously recorded storyimes Join in the fun with Miss Andrea, Miss Leslie, Miss Emily, and Miss Eileen!


Online Program for Adults:

The Northwest Room at Home video series examines local history in a number of ways. Check out “Digitizing the Juleen Panoramas“, the most recent video.


The Stay Home, Stay Healthy Virtual book club meetings through Microsoft Teams have just begun. The next session is on August 22nd, and the book is Miracle Creek by Angie Kim.

Presentations on job searching skills and resources took place on Facebook weekly through July, and the recordings can all be viewed at epls.org/jobseeker. Starting soon in August, look for a series on entrepreneurial skills and resources to help people start their own businesses.

Grow Your Jobseeking Skills


Create @ Home recorded DIY arts and crafts videos have been posted monthly during this time. This week’s episode is on how to make “hypertufa’ flower pots – a type of lighter weight cement material – from a mixture of ingredients.


Behind the scenes down in technical services, selecting, ordering, receiving, cataloging, and labeling new materials have continued throughout the time the library has been closed. To see what’s been ordered, take a look at the new fiction, nonficiton, DVD and children’s books lists. All on order items can be found in the catalog.

Website improvements have been ongoing, as we try to provide the most needed information such as COVID-19 updates and job searching resources front and center.


Repairing and Re-configuring – While we are closed, we will be renewing, repairing, and replacing some service desks, and adding features to increase the safety of patrons and staff when we can reopen.


Library staff are used to helping people in all sorts of ways, so it certainly does not feel the same without you, but at least we can see you for curbside pickups, and talk to you over the phone. Libraries will be allowed to reopen in a limited fashion in Phase 3, so we have to get there first. We hope that day comes soon.

The library fish miss you too!

Summer Sewing

Get out that machine and give sewing a try (again) this summer.

It seems like lots of people have taken an interest in making things by hand these days, whether it be bread or soap or clothing. Some of the library staff have been busy baking sourdough, making masks, remodeling, tidying, and gardening during the time the library was closed, and for some of us the creative frenzy continues even now that we are back in the library.

If you have a sewing machine collecting dust and never really learned how to use it, check out this beginner level class on how to make a tote bag from Creativebug, one of the library’s most recent additions to our online resources.

To see the whole video, follow this link: Market Tote Bag.
You will need to login with your library card number and PIN.

Everyone can use another shopping bag, right? Well, maybe if it’s a cute, lined, one-of-a-kind version! In this session, instructor Cal Patch makes sure to explain the project in terms that any beginner will understand. There’s even a section on how to thread the needle. The good thing about Creativebug classes is that they are broken up into segments; if you don’t need to watch a section just skip ahead.

I tried out this project and found it to be easy to follow, but there are a few places where you can go wrong. I had to take mine apart twice! (It is pictured at the bottom of this article):

1. Make sure to pay special attention to what she does with attaching the straps. The straps must be placed on the outside of your bag cover before you put together the lining and outer cover.

2. Copy exactly what she’s doing when she’s putting the two layers together. The outer piece, whether liner or cover, needs to be wrong side out, and the inner piece needs to be right side out. On my final try I just did what she did and it worked.

The bag and strap dimensions are left up to the maker. I cut my bag pieces to 17″x17″ for a 16″ square bag. You could make yours smaller, larger, or rectangular. Even if you aren’t a beginner, you may be inspired by this project to start sewing again


In addition to lots of Creativebug sewing classes, the library has many books on sewing. Here are a few 2020 titles for you to check out!

Sew Step by Step: How to Use Your Sewing Machine to Make, Mend, and Customize by Alison Smith, would be a great choice for anyone wanting to learn in depth how to sew. With chapters on fabrics, stitches, hems, patterns, pleats, and more, you can’t go wrong with this handy and complete guide.

Maybe your life is focused right now on your kids, or maybe you miss your grandkids and would like to send them a surprise. Animal Friends to Sew: Simple Handmade Decor, Toys, and Gifts for Kids by Sanae Ishida contains lots of simple projects to choose from.

House of Pinheiro’s Work to Weekend Wardrobe: Sew Your Own Capsule Collection by Rachel Pinheiro while not for beginners, has designs for wardrobe staples that you can mix and match to get you through the work week and into the weekend, and there are even accessories. Many of the garments would be suitable for summertime.

If hand sewing is more your speed, Joyful Mending by Noriko Misumi shows techniques for artful mending and reusing of clothing and other worn items that we still enjoy, instead of throwing them away. These attractive repairs will make your clothing more original and you will likely treasure the pieces even more.

Joyful Mending: Visible Repairs for the Perfectly Imperfect Things We Love! (Paperback)

Quilt: Modern Curves and Bold Stripes by Heather Black and Daisy Aschehoug contains 15 different projects for all skill levels. Quilting can be fun to get into because you can make a beautiful quilt entirely with simple straight lines, but the modern designs in this book are heavy into circles, a favorite motif of mine.


Sewing can be peaceful and meditative, and/or challenging and frustrating, but it’s almost always rewarding in the end. Get out that machine and those fabrics you’ve had for years and give sewing another try.

Birding from Home

No photo description available.
Photo by JoAnna Thomas of me and my camera, seeking Lazuli Buntings near Snohomish one spring.

A few years ago I became one of those (some may say) weird people who are fascinated with birds. You know, the kind that you see pulled over on a country road gawking at something in a field, or in a big group of blandly dressed folks all wearing binoculars, or stopped in the middle of a trail pointing a camera with a giant lens up at the trees.

When COVID took over our lives it was necessary to stay home, and stay healthy, but it’s been a good time to keep birding, too. It seems we had an amazing spring in terms of ‘good’ birds in our fairly urban area close to downtown Everett, from what I could see and what others reported as well. I spent a lot of time taking photos and recording birdsongs in my own backyard, and in the parks close to home.

I also listened to a really interesting and accessible book about birds by author Jennifer Ackerman, who has been writing about science and nature for 30 years. The Bird Way: A New Look at How Birds Talk, Work, Play, Parent, and Think is available as an e-audiobook which is read by the author, and it is thoroughly enjoyable.

The book contains lots of new scientific discoveries about how smart birds actually are; now it’s known that their tiny brains, previously assumed to be mostly operating on instinct, are capable of astonishing feats. How birds use intelligence and ingenuity in their daily activities is explored in separate chapters in the areas listed in the subtitle.

The section about bird songs and calls was really mind blowing. Birds can and do understand ‘foreign languages’ – they quickly learn to decipher an incredible amount of detailed information in other species vocalizations. Other chapters feature raptors who spread fire to increase their hunting success, hummingbirds who know how long a flower takes to replenish nectar, cooperative nesters who aren’t even related, and crows and parrots who solve puzzles, sometimes as a team. Ackerman says this is really a thrilling time in bird science. I agree!

File:Phylidonyris novaehollandiae Bruny Island.jpg - Wikipedia
New Holland Honeyeater, an Australian bird that conveys super-detailed information about predators in its calls. Photo from Wikipedia.

If you haven’t heard of Ackerman, you’ve probably heard of David Sibley. For any fellow birders out there, check out this video that features the two of them in a virtual program on World Migratory Bird Day.


The library has a hundreds of books about birds for adults and youth. Below are a few recent additions to the collection to check out.

John Marzluff, probably best know for his work with crows at the University of Washington, as well as his talks at EPL, has published a new book, In Search of Meadowlarks. This book looks at sustainable food production methods that are compatible with bird and wildlife conservation. Meadowlarks live in most areas of the country, yet their numbers, like many birds, are in decline. Marzluff examines the reasons and ends with a chapter on what we can do to help.

Image may contain: bird, sky and outdoor
Hopefully you have been lucky enough to see a Meadowlark, and to hear its beautiful song.

What It’s Like to be a Bird, by David Allen Sibley, who’s famous for his illustrated bird guides which are favorites of many birders, is a bit of a departure for the author. Like The Bird Way mentioned above, Sibley takes a look at questions such as: “Can birds smell?” “Is this the same cardinal that was at my feeder last year?” and “Do robins ‘hear’ worms?” He says that he first planned this book many years ago as a children’s book. With two starred reviews, it sounds like it was worth the years of effort.

If birds themselves aren’t interesting enough, check out the bird related The Falcon Thief by Joshua Hammer. This is the story of Jeffrey Lendrum, who for two decades had a lucrative business of stealing, smuggling, and selling endangered falcon’s eggs to wealthy clients who were involved in falcon racing. Part true-crime narrative, part epic adventure, this book is hard to put down.

If gardening comes first for you, but you’d like to learn more about birds, try out Attracting Birds and Butterflies by Barbara Ellis. Planting for wildlife will certainly increase your chances of seeing some of our amazing local birds in your yard, acreage, or balcony. Even if you have little experience or time, you can make some changes that will help birds and butterflies survive.

Pacific Flyway by Audrey Benedict is a gorgeous photographic collection of images of the Pacific Flyway, the 10,000 mile stretch from the Arctic to southern South America, which is traveled by many bird species on their seasonal migrations. Alaska, Washington, Oregon, and California coasts are crucial to support these birds on their journeys.

Close to Birds: an Intimate Look at Our Feathered Friends by Roine Magnusson is another photographic examination of the wonder of birds which features close up, super detailed photos of birds, all the work of the author.

So take a look at these great bird books, look around your yard and neighborhood, and discover the joys of birding, if you haven’t already. It is simultaneously challenging, relaxing, exciting, healthy, and just plain therapeutic!


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Chestnut-backed Chickadee in my backyard with a grub for its babies. It was a great joy to watch the progress of the family without leaving my yard.

Know About Novelist?

There are many ways we at Everett Public Library try to to help you find your next great read. Normally, we offer book clubs, Everett Reads!, book displays all over the library, and author talks, plus you can ask us for recommendations in person. Right now the options are more limited since we are closed, but you can still check out our book reviews and Notable New Fiction book lists on our blog, A Reading Life. We have staff picks collections that show up in our catalog. You can email us at libref@everettwa.gov, call us Monday-Friday from 10-5 (425-257-8000), or ask us for recommendations on Facebook. If none of those appeal to you read on.

Novelist is one of many research databases that the library subscribes to for our patrons to use, but it happens to be one that a lot of librarians use on occasion as well. It’s a fast way for busy librarians to find a list of books similar to a one a patron just finished. It has a variety of ways to find your next read by genre, appeal, themes, and award winners. I recently used it myself to discover how I might describe a certain type of book that I love reading.

Since we’ve been been staying home basically all the time due to the Stay Home, Stay Healthy emergency order, I’ve been listening to more audiobooks on weekends. I finished one I really enjoyed called After Me Comes the Flood, by Sarah Perry, and realized how much I have liked the other books I’ve read by her, The Essex Serpent and Melmoth (for a fascinating look at what was happening medically in her life when she wrote that one, check out this Guardian article “Out of my mind: Sarah Perry on writing under the influence of drugs“).

Since there wasn’t another book by her I could listen to, I decided to see how NoveList categorized or described After Me Comes the Flood.
Genre: First person narratives; Psychological suspense
Storyline: Character-driven
Pace: Leisurely paced
Tone: Atmospheric; Creepy

Okay, so I like creepy, psychological books that take place in eerie, atmospheric settings. I always knew I was weird. So how to find more? When searching by title, scroll past the reviews to find a Search for More option where you can choose from those descriptors and more to find similar books. For me it was the creepiness, atmosphere, and psychological suspense that were most appealing, so I can check those boxes to find similar titles, 66 of them in this case.


Searching by author gives the option for author read-alikes and title read-alikes lists. This is one of the most useful functions of NoveList for librarians, because you will get a printable list to be able to hand to patrons for future reading ideas.

You will often find NoveList recommendations right in our catalog without having to navigate to NoveList. Look up the title of the book you loved, click on the link to fully open the information about the title, scroll down a bit, and often you will find Read-alikes right there.

NoveList is not just for novels – there are nonfiction categories to search through – and it isn’t just for adult books. You can find books for ages 0-8, 9-12, and teens. There are many genres to choose from for each age range; for instance Ages 9-12 brings up a real variety such as Adventure Stories, Horror, If you Like…, and Mysteries.

We also subscribe to NoveList K-12, which is similar but focused on books for kids and teens. By doing an advanced search you can find books in the right reading level (Accelerated Reader and Lexile), publish date, and even limit by gender and cultural identity of the author. You can also look for titles that received starred reviews.

Another nice thing about NoveList is that it connects with our catalog; by clicking on Check Availability and then Go to Catalog, you can place a hold on the book. What NoveList doesn’t do so well is find our ebooks – it seems to only be able to connect with our print copies of titles. Still, you may find it useful to find a list of titles to read now or in the future.

May you find something good to read in whatever way suits you best. We are still here, ready to help.

Happy reading!

Homemade relief for your dry hands? Yes, please!

Lotion bars made by EPL staff member JoAnna

Hands getting dry after all the hand washing?  My horribly dry, painful hands got me thinking about what I could do to heal them, since regular old lotion isn’t cutting it. Then I remembered my coworker JoAnna had made a lot of lotion bars, which are very moisturizing, and it turns out she’s tested the following tutorial.

You’ve probably heard by now about our newest arts and crafts resource, Creativebug. I have looked at it quite happily for quick and easy art projects, but hadn’t thought to look for tutorials on making soaps, lotions, and other skincare and natural home products. But they do indeed have such classes. If you are looking for some relief for your hands, check out this quick and simple DIY Lotion Bar tutorial.

Tips from JoAnna:

* You can substitute coconut oil for one of the butters.
* If you do not have a double boiler, you can make it in a small crockpot or in the microwave. Be sure to use a glass bowl in the microwave as the beeswax takes a long time to melt and the bowl will get very hot.
* Melt the beeswax first, once melted you can add the other butters to mix.
* You can add vitamin E to help with skin repair; break 1-2 capsules into the mix.
* If you do not have any molds on hand, you can use silicone cupcake holders.
* Put completed bars in a tin or plastic bag to store so they don’t get messy.
* Beware, in warm temperature they can melt.
* To use, hold in your cupped hands. The warmth of your hands will soften the wax.
* The ingredients can be ordered and delivered from hobby and craft stores, or soap making supply companies.


Besides Creativebug (which really has tons of great classes) we have eBooks about making your own bath, skin care, and cleaning products.

The Organic Country Home Handbook by Natalie Wise, includes recipes for cleaning all areas of the home, from kitchen to bath, and everywhere in between. If you are so inclined you can find everything you need here to do some spring cleaning! There is also a chapter, “The Medicine Cabinet” that features homemade skin care products.

DIY Beauty: Easy, All-Natural Recipes Based on Your Favorites from Lush, Kiehl’s, Burt’s Bees, Bumble and bumble, Laura Mercier, and More!
by Ina De Clercq
From lip balm to bath bombs, these recipes attempt to recreate best-loved products from popular beauty product companies.

Homemade Bath Bombs & More: Soothing Spa Treatments for Luxurious Self-Care and Bath-Time Bliss by Heidi Kundin
This book focuses on bath bombs and other fun and luxurious bath products such as sugar scrubs, body butter, and bath jellies. Bath jellies? I will have to look that one up!

Natural Beauty: 35 Step-by-Step Projects for Homemade Beauty by Karen Gilbert
These ‘lotion and potion’ recipes for face, body, and hair, use readily available, natural ingredients and easy-to-follow methods.


I hope Creativebug classes and our crafty eBooks inspire you to try your hand at making healthy, simple home and beauty products! And may your hands be in much better shape than mine.

How to Make a Face Mask

Masks made by EPL staff for mailing to family and sharing locally.
The City of Everett is accepting mask/face covering donations. Instructions can be found here.

The CDC is now recommending that everyone wear a face covering when going out in public places to help control the spread of the coronavirus that caused COVID-19.  

“CDC recommends wearing cloth face coverings in public settings where other social distancing measures are difficult to maintain (e.g., grocery stores and pharmacies), especially in areas of significant community-based transmission.”

From “Use of Cloth Face Coverings to Help Slow the Spread of COVID-19” This article contains three designs; two are no-sew.


As you’ve probably heard, masks for medical professionals are in very short supply. In response, many people were sewing hundreds of thousands of masks for hospitals through Providence’s “100 Million Mask Challenge.” According to that website, no more are needed because local manufacturing companies have now jumped in to help and are mass producing masks and shields – great news indeed!

We can keep from spreading the disease to others by wearing a mask, and possibly make ourselves safer at the same time, but finding one can be very difficult. Since medical masks should be reserved for medical professionals, we are being encouraged to make our own – hence, the mask making craze that’s sweeping the nation.

Before jumping in to the video tutorials, here a some suggestions I have read multiple times:

  1. Use tightly woven cotton fabric, such as quilting cotton. Tip: Hold two layers up to the light to see how dense it is.
  2. Make sure the fit on your mask is good – gaps are to be avoided.
  3. Make sure to follow good hygiene with your mask. This article “How NOT to Wear a Mask” from the New York Times is full of good information.

There are many, many tutorials out there on making masks, and there are several styles as well. Some incorporate a pocket for a filter, some do not. Some patterns are form fitting, some pleated, some gathered. Many require a sewing machine, but there are plenty of no-sew versions as well.

Speaking of sewing, check out the Creativebug Sewing Machine Basics class. There are many other sewing classes to discover in that fun, new-to-EPL resource, so check it out.

I spent some time looking at different tutorials and found these to be easy to follow. They range from very easy with no sewing involved, to requiring a bit of machine sewing familiarity.

A simple pleated mask from Providence St. Joseph

This pattern, suitable for beginners, uses straight lines and ties. The most difficult part is probably sewing through the thick pleated sections.

A fitted mask that has space for a filter

This pattern, similar to the style I made, conforms to the face nicely with little gapping. The presenter, who happens to be a doctor, explains the process clearly. It is intended to be safe enough for medical professionals.This pattern requires a bit of sewing experience, but isn’t really difficult.


A simple but effective drawstring pattern that uses cord instead of elastic

This is a well thought out design and provides great coverage. It has no pleats to deal with and only uses straight lines. It features a filter pocket and a wire to conform around the nose.
I made one of these and it is comfortable and very easy to make. You have to be careful how you put it on so that there is no gapping – check out the Q&A video she made here. If you follow the directions for putting it on, it fits very nicely.



Besides sewn fabric masks, there are face coverings you can made from socks, bandanas or t-shirts, shop towels, and NWPP reusable shopping bags.

A quick and easy mask made from shop towels

If you have a roll of paper shop towels around, you may want to try this out. All you need is one towel, a stapler, and two rubber bands.


My mask

I wanted to make a mask to wear when visiting my 95 year old mother, so started with a free pattern from Peanut Patterns. After making one, I decided I wanted more coverage below the chin, so added about 1.5″ to the length. Here is the process I used in images. If you like the looks of this one, follow the link to get the free pattern and directions. I will admit I messed up and had to fix my first one, so consider making a test one first with a fabric you don’t love. I find this mask fits well and is sturdy, easy to wash, and quick to dry, and it fits in a small pocket in my purse for when I head over to help my mom.

1. Copy pattern onto card stock if you want to make several – it’s quick to trace. Then double fabric and cut out two of these shapes, resulting in four pieces. 2. Stack two pieces right sides together and sew the long, most curved edge at the top of the photo. Use 3/8″ seam allowance. Do this to both sets. 3. Press the seam apart (I found it easier to press them back as shown. 4. Open the two sets and place right sides together, making sure you have the curves matching (It would be easy to turn them opposite ways) 5. Sew along the top edge. 6. Turn right side out and press. 7. Open out and press 3/8″ seam along sides, fold over and press again. 8. Attach elastic at the same time that you sew down the seam pressed in step 7. (I used looped hair ties) 9. Close up photo of attached elastic. 10. Fold mask closed and top stitch top edge 1/8″ from edge. 11. Turn inside out and sew bottom edge. 12. Turn right side out through open ends. 13. Sew ends closed and top stitch bottom edge. Done!

If you make a mask or two, remember to wear them wisely, as described in this article, wash after use, and definitely keep washing your hands! Use what you have at home for mask making instead of leaving home to find materials. If you enjoy it and want to make more to donate, visit this City web page and follow the specific instructions on how to properly and safely donate masks. Stay home, and stay safe.


Create @ the Library, Except this Time @ Home!

A Reading Life blog is supposed to be about reading, right? Well, this post IS about books, and I will mention a few newly added eBooks that relate, but mostly this is about BOOK ART!

For the last five years, I’ve put on a program for adults called ‘Create @ the Library’ in which attendees, a lot of them regulars, complete an art or craft project. We’ve painted, sculpted, worked with clay, paper, mosaic, and cement. We’ve generally had a great time, made new friends, and realized how creative we can be. Each April we focus on a recycled book themed art or craft project to celebrate National Library Week, and this year, although the library is closed, I still wanted to share the project we had planned, ‘Book Folding Fun’. You can do this project at home, with just a few common supplies. Below is a narrated presentation that walks you through all the steps. You can also view this video, and many more, on the Library’s YouTube Channel.

If that’s not enough creating with books for you, check out these just added eBook titles from Overdrive and cloudLibrary.

There seems to be a dearth of book folding books out there, and even fewer in digital format. The first one on the list, Book Origami : The Art of Folding Books by John M Green, contains patterns for numbers, letters, animals, and shapes. He also explains making your own designs. It’s not a very visually exciting book but at least it has patterns. Green uses a whole different method – one I have not tried (since I’ve only folded one book myself!) – so be ready to learn if you want to use his patterns.

Playing with Books: The Art of Upcycling, Deconstructing, and Reimagining the Book by Jason Thompson, contains all sorts of creative projects involving books, including cutting them into sculptural shapes, reusing paperback covers for postcards, making a book into a pocketbook, and a book jacket into a billfold. The introduction contains a passage that caught my eye:

“We cannot hope to save all the books from the landfill – this is a Sisyphean task. But we can be inspired by the creativity of these artists, who reinterpret both lowly and lofty books into something more.”

The Repurposed Library: 33 Craft Projects That Give Old Books New Life by Lisa Occhipinti is a book I have checked out before in a non-digital format and enjoyed. There are lots of fun projects including hanging and wall sculptures made of books and book pages.

Art Made from Books: Altered, Sculpted, Carved, Transformed by Laura Heyenga is not a project book, but a showcase of serious art made by artists in which books are used to create some amazing works. I haven’t had a chance to look at this one yet because it is already checked out.


Lastly, I wanted to share some images of book art made by one of Everett Public Library’s staff members. Although I am a beginner at the art of book folding, Kim, who works in the technical services department, is super talented at this craft. She has years of experience, and has made many challenging and amazingly complex designs. You may have seen them displayed at the library at times.

She has even made portraits of friends and family members! Now that’s talent!

If you are craving a creative project, take a look around your place and see if there are some outdated books you could repurpose into art. There’s something really appealing about the printed page that goes beyond the words themselves.

How to stay busy: eBooks to Create, Garden, and Organize

If you are one of those people who just has to stay busy (I know how you feel!) and you’re stuck at home going stir crazy, check out some recently added eBooks that may help inspire you in a new direction.

Arts, Crafts, and Hobbies
Since I can’t do my Create @ the Library programs right now, I wanted to find some how-to arts and crafts books to keep our regular attendees, and everyone else, creating.

Everyday Watercolor and Everyday Watercolor Flowers by Jenna Rainey

Milk Soaps: 35 Skin-Nourishing Recipes for Making Milk-Enriched Soaps, from Goat to Almond by Anne-Marie Faiola

Making a Life: Working by Hand and Discovering the Life You Are Meant to Live by Melanie Falick

Japanese Wonder Crochet: A Creative Approach to Classic Stitches by Nihon Vogue

Crochet Every Way Stitch Dictionary: 125 Essential Stitches to Crochet in Three Ways by Dora Ohrenstein

Sew Bags: The Practical Guide to Making Purses, Totes, Clutches & More; 13 Skill-Building Projects by Hilarie Wakefield Dayton

Gardening (and Nature)
We have had some beautiful weather perfect for gardening, so while we may feel gloomy inside, if we get our hands in the soil, whether in our indoor window gardens, our small urban plots, or the ‘back 40’ we can’t help but feel some hope.

Small Garden Style: A Design Guide for Outdoor Rooms and Containers by Isa Hendry Eaton and Jennifer Blaise Kramer

The Timber Press Guide to Gardening in the Pacific Northwest by Carol and Norman Hall

The Ann Lovejoy Handbook of Northwest Gardening by Ann Lovejoy

DIY Gardening Projects: 35 Awesome Gardening Hacks to Better Your Garden by Cheryl Palmer

Field Guide to Urban Gardening: How to Grow Plants, No Matter Where You Live by Kevin  Espiritu

Nature’s Best Hope: A New Approach to Conservation that Starts in Your Yard by Douglas W. Tallamy

Wilding: Returning Nature to Our Farm by Isabella Tree

Home Organizing
If I wasn’t working from home right now I might just try to dig in, toss out or recycle, and get organized. Maybe. If you have more motivation than I do for organizing, check out these titles for some inspiration.

Martha Stewart’s Organizing : the Manual for Bringing Order to Your Life, Home & Routines by Martha Stewart

Outer Order, Inner Calm: Declutter and Organize to Make More Room for Happiness by Gretchen Rubin

The Home Edit: A Guide to Organizing and Realizing Your House Goals by Clea Shearer

The Gentle Art of Swedish Death Cleaning: How to Free Yourself and Your Family from a Lifetime of Clutter by Margareta Magnusson

The Longing for Less: Living with Minimalism by Kyle Chayka

I hope you enjoy some of these new-to-the-library eBooks and find ways to keep occupied and engaged during these unprecedented times we are living in.

New eBooks and eAudiobooks from EPL

With the temporary closure of our libraries due to the coronavirus, we are working to boost our e-content – that’s just a library term for eBooks and eAudiobooks, but it also can apply to anything digital that we offer to our patrons, like movies, documentaries, and even learning resources such as Lynda.com. But back to eBooks, this week you can find more than twice the usual amount of new and new-to-us titles in both Overdrive and cloudLibrary!

Tip: Although many readers look for titles directly from the apps, to see all our e-books in one place, use the library catalog and limit to eBooks or eAudiobooks. You can then check out right from the catalog (after logging in) and find the book ready in the app, or jump over to the app and search for the specific title you found.

Recent additions to explore:

Fiction
Cozy: The Authenticity Project by Clare Pooley (eBook)*

Dystopian: The Fortress by S.A. Jones (eBook)*

General Fiction: Weather by Jenny Offill (eAudio)*

The Mountains Sing by Que Mai Phan Nguyen (eBook)*

The Shape of Family by Shilpi Somaya Gowda (eBook)*

Gothic/Literary: After Me Comes the Flood by Sarah Perry (eAudio)*

Gothic/Mystery: Things in Jars by Jess Kidd (eBook) *

Suspense/Mystery: The Tenant by Katrine Engberg (eBook) *

Thriller: Before Familiar Woods by Ian Pisarcik (eBook)*

Non-fiction
Biography: John Adams Under Fire: The Founding Father’s Fight for Justice in the Boston Massacre Murder Trial by David Fisher with Dan Abrams (eBook)*

Business/Sociology: Pharma: Greed, Lies, and the Poisoning of America by Gerald Posner (eAudiobook)*

Upstream: The Quest to Solve Problems Before They Happen by Dan Heath (eBook)*

History, WWII: I Want You to Know We’re Still Here: A Post-Holocaust Memoir by Esther Safran Foer (eBook)*

Memoir: Rust by Eliese Colette Goldbach (eBook)*

Politics/Self-improvement: Lead from the Outside by Stacey Abrams (eBook)*

Psychology: Hello I Want to Die Please Fix Me: Depression in the First Person by Anna Mehler Paperny (eBook)*

Self-help: Untamed by Glennon Doyle (eBook)*

Prefer something familiar and beloved in these stressful times? Just this week we have a new crop of Duke Classics. Consider using this time to finally read those book you’ve always meant to.

Take a look at all of our newest Overdrive eBooks, eAudiobooks, and just added cloudLibrary titles, and you’ll be sure to find your next great read.