Did You Know? (Pencil Edition)

That the average lead pencil can draw a line 35 miles long?

I found this on page 22 of Random Illustrated Facts by Mike Lowery.

Stationery Fever: from Paper Clips to Pencils and Everything in Between by John Z. Komurki is a well-researched and thorough book about all of our beloved office supplies. I adored the pictures of orderly rows of glass jars of pencils. I doubt there is anyone who doesn’t have a pen or pencil type they prefer or perhaps loves their stapler as much as Milton Waddams from the movie Office Space does!

I’m not sure how far colored or charcoal pencils write, but they are used to create beautiful artwork. The Encyclopedia of Coloured Pencil Techniques by Judy Martin and 101 Textures in Graphite and Charcoal by Steven Pearce are just a few of the many art books we have here at the library.

Who knew that sharpening those pencils could be such an endeavor? How to Sharpen Pencils by David Rees explains – in exact detail – what a precise undertaking this can be. From the width of the collar to the length of the point right down to the tip, personal preference determines whether you use a pocket knife, a blade cutter or a hand crank or electric model to sharpen your pencil. His book is a little tongue in cheek, but great fun to read. As the illustrations show, be sure to wear safety goggles while using special pencil sharpening techniques!

Pencils today are almost always made from graphite and clay, not lead. Graphite is a gray crystalline allotropic form of carbon which occurs as a mineral in some rocks and can be made from coke. It is used as a solid lubricant, in pencils, and as a moderator in nuclear reactors. The Elements by Tom Jackson breaks the periodic table down and tells how carbon (graphite) is an element and therefore cannot be broken down any further into simpler substances.

Pencils can be extraordinary. The Promise of a Pencil by Adam Braun is such an inspiring story! Adam took a 100 day trip to 50 countries. He decided to ask one child per country what they wanted more than anything in the world. In India a boy wanted a pencil. He’d never been to school and had seen other children writing with them. This began his calling and he has now helped start more than 200 schools all over the world.

So what are you waiting for? Get out your pencil and start writing or drawing. Just make sure you have it perfectly sharpened!

4 thoughts on “Did You Know? (Pencil Edition)

  1. Who knew that simply sharpening a pencil could be so technical? Next thing you know there will be college classes available to be certified in this function with a BA Degree to boot! Things that make you go “Hmmm?”.

    Like

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