And the Winners Are…

Every year I look forward to the book awards that exist for works of adult literature such as The Man Booker Prize, The Pulitzer Prize and The National Book Award. However, the most exciting awards that I wait for all year are the ALA (American Library Association) Youth Media Awards. Yesterday, the 2018 award ceremony was held in Denver and many awards were given to distinguished Children’s and Young Adult books.

Recently, I was reading a post in a library Facebook group I belong to and a librarian had written about children’s picture books. One of her coworkers at the library told her that in his eyes picture books had no merit whatsoever. As a Youth Services Librarian and parent, I was shocked to read this. Children’s books and Young Adult literature support youth in many different capacities from emergent literacy to becoming accomplished readers. Rudine Sims Bishop writes about how children’s literature can act as both a mirror and a window. Kids can see themselves in stories, but they can also see others, expanding their view of the world and the society in which they live.

The Youth Media Awards are a celebration of the amazing literature that exists for young people throughout the United States. Awards are given to a wide cross-section of books that include both fiction and nonfiction. I have highlighted many of the award winners below. For a full listing of all of the winners, go here.

Caldecott: “Awarded to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book.”

Winner: Wolf in the Snow by Matthew Cordell

This almost wordless picture book tells the story of a girl on her way home from school who discovers a wolf pup left behind by his pack. She embarks on a journey with the pup to find his family. The pen and ink drawings with watercolors convey a story of warmth and kindness even in the midst of adversity.

Newbery“Awarded to the author of the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children.”

Winner: Hello, Universe by Erin Entrada Kelly

Hello, Universe is told in four different voices–all sixth grade students on summer break. The book explores the friendship that develops between three of the kids while taking on other topics such as bullying and cross-generational relationships. The author maintains a sense of humor while telling a poignant story of kids making sense of and finding their place in the world.

Coretta Scott King: “Designed to commemorate the life and works of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and to honor Mrs. Coretta Scott King for her courage and determination to continue the work for peace, the Coretta Scott King Book Awards annually recognize outstanding books for young adults and children by African American authors and illustrators that reflect the African American experience. Further, the Award encourages the artistic expression of the black experience via literature and the graphic arts in biographical, social, and historical treatments by African American authors and illustrators.”

Illustrator Award: Out of Wonder: Poems Celebrating Poets, illustrated by Ekua Holmes and written by Kwame Alexander with Chris Colderly and Marjory Wentworth

Mixed media collage paintings by Ekua Holmes are paired with poems written by Kwame Alexander, Chris Colderley and Marjory Wentworth. The poems are written in the style of famous poets such as Rumi, Maya Angelou and Naomi Shihab Nye. The paintings expand the experience of the poem and are sure to inspire kids to read and write poetry. This was Kwame Alexander’s hope when he began working on this book.

Author award: Piecing Me Together by Renee Watson

This multi-layered novel tells the story of Jade, an African-American teenager living in Portland, Oregon. She lives with her single mom and sometimes sees her father when he can keep his promises. Jade is an artist and she is so smart that she has a scholarship to a cutting edge private high school on the other side of town. She constantly struggles with the feeling of being broken up into little pieces whether it is at her private school or with her wealthy African American mentor. This story addresses tough topics such as race, gender, white privilege and intersectionality.

Pura Belpre“The Pura Belpré Award, established in 1996, is presented to a Latino/Latina writer and illustrator whose work best portrays, affirms, and celebrates the Latino cultural experience in an outstanding work of literature for children and youth.”

Winner: La Princesa and the Pea by Juana Martinez-Neal

This is a diverse retelling of the classic Hans Christian Andersen story, The Princess and the Pea. The story is set in Peru and features whimsical illustrations throughout. It makes for a great read-aloud and Spanish words are found throughout the text.

Stonewall“presented to English language books that have exceptional merit relating to the gay/lesbian/bisexual/transgender experience.”

Winner: The 57 Bus by Dashka Slater and Little & Lion by Brandy Colbert

bus

This work of Young Adult Nonfiction tells the true story of Sasha and Richard. They saw each other every day during the week on the 57 bus in Oakland, California. They never spoke because of how very different they were. Sasha lived in a comfortable middle class neighborhood and attended a private school. Richard who was African American lived in quite different circumstances and attended a large public high school. One day on the bus, Richard does something that will change his and Sasha’s lives forever. This story is not just a retelling of the events. Instead, it is an exploration of gender identity, crime and justice.

little

Suzette has just returned to Los Angeles from her boarding school on the east coast. Home is definitely Los Angeles and she is not sure if she wants to leave again. She has a crush on a boy, here friends are there, and her stepbrother Lionel has recently been diagnosed with bipolar disorder. She is a source of support for him, but things become complicated when Suzette realizes she has a crush on the girl who he loves. His illness spirals and she is forced to reckon with herself and find a way to keep her brother safe.

Printz: “The Michael L. Printz Award is an award for a book that exemplifies literary excellence in young adult literature.”

Winner: We Are Okay by Nina LaCour

okay

Marin has started her first year of college and is trying to forsake her best friend Mabel. Before her grandpa died, she and Mabel were starting to fall in love. Her grandpa’s death pulled her into a deep grief and she realized the many things he kept from her while he was raising her: pictures of her mother who died surfing when Marin was just a baby; stories and memories of her mother; and his own grief. She left for college immediately after his death without telling anyone including Mabel and her parents. But now Mabel has come to visit for winter break and Marin is challenged to open her heart and let those who love her come back into her life.

3 thoughts on “And the Winners Are…

  1. Pingback: Underrated Reads | A Reading Life

  2. Pingback: Yes, We Need Diverse Books | A Reading Life

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