The Birds and the Bees… and Gardening

Gardening, for me, can be an interest that waxes and wanes. I usually get excited about flowers in the spring, and then get tired of it all by the parched days of August, when all I can do is keep plants watered enough so they don’t die. This past winter on a very cold day, I noticed a large flock of birds, mostly American Robins and Ceder Waxwings, descend on my cotoneaster shrub and start eating berries like mad. Usually birds leave these berries alone, so I knew they were a bit desperate. That started me thinking about deliberately landscaping with plants that birds can use for food and shelter, and those that provide for bees and other pollinators. What can we do to help? Luckily, the library has some books on the topic, because I have a lot to learn. Most are available in ebook format, as well.

A Cedar Waxwing joins a mob of berry seeking birds in my backyard cotoneaster tree (a non-native plant, that does attract bees, and on occasion, birds).

Douglas Tallamy, an ecologist who teaches at the University of Delaware, has been a trailblazer behind the research that proves we must plant native trees, shrubs, and flowers in order for butterflies and other pollinators to survive, and we must do it now. The decline in bird populations is believed to be partly caused by lack of food for their young; almost all birds exclusively feed their offspring caterpillars and insects. The sterile landscapes that dominate our neighborhoods do not support enough insects to feed birds, but if enough of us plant native plants, we can make a difference together. Even those of us with tiny yards can contribute in this way. Learn more by watching this talk given by Tallamy to WWF-Canada.

Books by Douglas Tallamy
Bringing Nature Home: How You Can Sustain Wildlife with Native Plants was Tallamy’s first book about planting natives to regain the biodiversity we’ve lost. Check out the audiobook and listen while you garden!
Nature’s Best Hope: A New Approach to Conservation That Starts in Your Yard describes Tallamy and others quest to start a national movement to enlist homeowners everywhere to help create conservation corridors. You will learn specific tips on how to add native plants to your yard.
The Living Landscape: Designing for Beauty and Biodiversity in the Home Garden by Rick Darke and Doug Tallamy
This book, full of photos by Darke, will help you create a beautiful, natural, and diverse garden that will work for both your family and wildlife.

Gardening with Native Plants of the Pacific Northwest by Arthur R. Kruckeberg
This is an older book but it’s still useful – after all, native plants aren’t new varieties created by humans, but the original species that have been around for thousands of years. The Garden Uses section after each plant’s description gives a lot of detail on growing needs and habits. Also useful are the plant lists in the back for specific settings such as shady dry, shady wet, maritime sun, etc. These are excellent lists for planning a native garden.

Real Gardens Grow Natives: Design, Plant, and Grow a Healthy Northwest Garden by Eileen M. Stark is another PNW guide, but this one is packed with color photos of plants, and includes many of our best native species. The usual garden book tips on soil, location, and landscape design are there, but this time with the focus on our beautiful Northwest native plants.

Garden Revolution: How Our Landscapes Can Be a Source of Environmental Change by Larry Weaner The author wants us to plant native, but instead of focusing only on the environmental benefits, he makes the point that it’s much easier and more rewarding to garden with native plants; they have evolved right here so are perfectly suited for the conditions. His ‘design’ method is much more natural – let the plants choose their place. Your garden can be “…a sanctuary for indigenous wildlife, and a protector of biodiversity.”

New Naturalism: Designing and Planting a Resilient, Ecologically Vibrant Home Garden by Kelly D. Norris explores the elements needed to create the natural looking outdoor spaces that we crave, rather than the tightly controlled and difficult to maintain landscapes that do nothing for the soul, or the environment. You can build your own meadow or prairie even in urban or suburban yards, and help increase biodiversity, while increasing your peace of mind.

The Pollinator Victory Garden: Win the War on Pollinator Decline with Ecological Gardening by Kim Eierman shows us how we can help pollinators, which are so important to our own food supply, to increase in number by making a change from “vast green pollinator deserts” (lawns) to pollinator havens. Pollinators, not just bees but many other insects, are in a steep decline. We can all help to win the war against pollinator decline by following the suggestions in The Pollinator Victory Garden.


Gardening with native plants feels rewarding. I have just started, and now have about 20 different species planted in pots. I have plans to turn a mostly empty garden bed into a natives only section. It feels like maybe I can make a difference.

A note about finding native plants at nurseries – it’s difficult. Consider telling your favorite nurseries that you want them to carry native plants. There are some native plant nurseries in our area, but don’t expect to find the plants you want in your usual shopping spots.

Douglas Tallamy and others have started Homegrown National Park, a way to promote the native plant movement and track the progress nationwide. After you start your garden, you can get on the map! Currently there is only one garden listed in Snohomish County – let’s create more, and help our birds, bees, and ourselves survive.


All in All it’s Just Another Body in the Wall

At first, I thought Riley Sager’s Home Before Dark might end up being another cliched hum-drum ghost story. My mind was already made up not to feel guilty if I decided to put it down and pick up another book to read. But some little voice (call it Jiminy Cricket, the ghost of the still living Stephen King, or hell, even Leonard Cohen whom I was listening to when I picked the book up) told me to keep going. So kept going I did and this book knocked my socks off. Well, they were already half off because my puppy was tugging on them so he could run around with them in his mouth, but you get what I’m saying.

As the book opens, an abandoned, possibly haunted, house still clings to the family who left it with just the clothes on their backs twenty-five years ago never to return. Ewan, his wife Jess, and their young daughter Maggie moved into the massive mansion for a fresh start. Ewan is a writer and his freelance jobs are drying up. He thinks the move into an old home with a colorful history will give him the push he needs to write a novel.

The house has its eccentricities: a chandelier that turns itself on, a record player in the den that plays a song from the album The Sound of Music. But all old houses have their own personalities, so the Holt family isn’t too worried about it. Jess made Ewan swear he wouldn’t get lost digging into the house’s past and although he makes the promise, he breaks it and finds out some disturbing things about the past owners of the home.

A father killed himself and then his daughter a few years before the Holts moved in. Before that, a 16-year-old girl had killed herself when her father forbade her from seeing a man she fell in love with. Many other inexplicable deaths occurred in the home when it was a bed and breakfast as well.

Ewan is awoken at the same time in the middle of the night to a thump and the record player starting up on its own and a strange tapping noise coming from the hallway. Meanwhile, their daughter Maggie complains about Mister Shadow and Miss Penny Face, two entities who seem to haunt her at night, watching her from the giant armoire in her bedroom. The haunting comes to a head two weeks after they move in and they flee in the night without any of their belongings.

Time shifts to 25 years later and Maggie is all grown up with a home restoration business of her own. Her father Ewan has just died. She remembers nothing from their stay in that house. But after running away in the night her father wrote a bestseller called House of Horrors that made the family a lot of money and pretty much ruined Maggie’s life. She was always “that girl who lived in a haunted house.”

At the reading of Ewan’s will, Maggie discovers that her parents never sold Baneberry Hall and her father left it to her. She decides it’s the perfect time to go there, renovate the house and finally find out what happened all those years ago, believing that both of her parents have spent the past 25 years telling her lies about it. Maggie goes to Baneberry Hall and shrugs off the feeling that the house is haunted by saying it’s such an old house of course it’s going to be odd.

But finding answers and the truth isn’t as easy as Maggie thought it’d be. The Ditmers, who used to look after and clean the house still live in a small house on the property. Mrs. Ditmer is old and has dementia and her daughter Hannah takes care or her. Hannah’s older sister Petra disappeared the same night that the Holt family ran away, and she hasn’t been seen since. Some of the talk is that Ewan must have had something to do with it, especially when her bones show up in the house.

Primarily a spooky mystery about the redemption of family and the need to heal the past, Home Before Dark is a damn fine read. Just spooky enough to pull the blankets around my shoulders and take a glimpse under the bed for any, you know, ghosts or dead folk and mysterious enough to have me wanting to hang around until it was solved, Home Before Dark is a book you can lose yourself in for a couple of hours. But make sure you keep that armoire closed and maybe put a two by four in the handles so Mister Shadow and Miss Penny Face can’t get out and watch you sleep.

Northwest Room Update: Japan Bazaar

A chance find while doing research in the Enid Nordlund collection of early Everett photographs turned up a picture of the Japan Bazaar at its first location at 1205 Hewitt. A Reading Life previously published an in-depth look at this business and the Kan family who ran it; you can explore that history here.

At first glance this image might not tell you much beyond the caption written at the top, and the extra information on the back. On the back someone had speculated that the picture was taken from the roof of a building at Pacific and Nassau around 1904 or 1905. Historian Jack O’Donnell pointed out that the large building on the right side of the foreground was still standing, and was actually one block north on Wall.

Image from the Enid Nordlund collection, Everett Public Library

Zooming in on a high resolution scan of an image can provide a lot of clues if you know what to look for. Many of these buildings had signs for businesses, which could be looked up in our Polk City Directories to help pin down an approximate year for the image. The bold lettering on the brick building to the left and midway back caught my eye. While it was a little bit blurry, it looked like “Japan Bazaar.” Ok… maybe more than a bit blurry, but bear with me.

Close up of the Japan Bazaar and Windsor Hotel – 1200 block of Hewitt.

From the directories and other sources I could confirm that the Japan Bazaar was located at 1205 Hewitt from 1901-1904. Across the street you can see the sign for the Windsor Hotel, which was at 1202 Hewitt, which helps confirm that I had the right block and that I wasn’t misreading the other blurry sign. The Japan Bazaar temporarily moved to 1924 Hewitt in 1905-06, before settling in at 1410 Hewitt in 1907, where it remained until it closed sometime between 1910 and 1911. It was around that time, as noted in the previous article, that the Kan family appear to have moved back to Seattle.

Sometimes it’s the little finds like this that make exploring our historic photos so much more enjoyable! It was nice to add another image of this business to our collection to join the lovely photo we have of the Kan family inside their 1410 Hewitt location.

https://nw.epls.org/digital/collection/EvrtMassacre/id/161/rec/1

Spot-Lit for May 2021

These titles – from established, new, and emerging authors – are some of the most anticipated new releases of the month, based on advance reviews and book world enthusiasm.

Click here to see all of these titles in the Everett Public Library catalog, where you can read reviews or summaries and place holds. Or click on a book cover below to enlarge it, or to view the covers as a slide show.

Notable New Fiction 2021 (to date) | All On-Order Fiction 2021 Debuts

Recent Reads

Last month I found myself with some unexpected time to read several fiction books that are hard to find a common theme for, but perhaps the common denominator is that they all transport us into another place, culture, or time.

The Removed by Brandon Hobson follows a Cherokee family, the Echotas, as they plan their yearly bonfire remembrance for their son Ray-Ray, who was killed by police at a mall at age 15. Their remaining son struggles with addiction and ignores their calls, escaping to a nightmarish town and the home of an old friend who is up to no good. Daughter Sonia gets herself tangled up in multiple unhealthy relationships with younger men. A mysterious child, Wyatt, who reminds the Echotas so much of Ray-Ray, comes into their lives briefly for foster care. Interspersed is the story of ancestor Tsala, who was killed on the Trail of Tears, and who tries to effect change in the here and now.
Kirkus Reviews states: “Spare, strange, bird-haunted, and mediated by grief, the novel defies its own bleakness as its calls forth a delicate and monumental endurance. A slim yet wise novel boils profound questions down to its final word: “Home.”


Who Is Maud Dixon by Alexandra Andrews
Florence is trying to get ahead in her job in publishing but makes a grave mistake. A new opportunity comes out of nowhere – a position as assistant to a wildly popular but extremely private author, known as Maud Dixon. The two of them travel to Morocco so that Maud can work on research for the setting of her next book. Florence begins to question Maud’s ability as a writer and the progress being made on the book. The two of them go out drinking, and the next day, Florence discovers that Maud has disappeared and presumes she is dead. Is it possible for Florence to assume Maud’s identity, finish to book, and grab the glory and the money? I had to find out!
Kirkus Reviews: “At every diabolical twist and turn, Andrews’ impish sense of humor peeks around the corner to jack up the fun. Terrific characters, vivid settings, and a deliciously dastardly, cunningly constructed plot.”


There’s No Such Thing as an Easy Job by Kikuko Tsumura is the first English translated work by the author who is well known in Japan. The main (unnamed) character is in her thirties, and after experiencing burnout at her former job, returns to live with her parents. She signs on with a temp agency hoping for a stress free job, and begins a series of strange occupations which range from surveillance, to writing ad copy for busses, to sitting in a hut in the woods in a huge park, so vast that many people get lost and need her to find them. Things get more complicated and mysterious as she progresses through the jobs. Just like the small number of other Japanese fiction I have read, I was sorry when this audiobook ended. There’s something peaceful yet oddly fascinating about the mundane details of every day life. See – I cannot describe it. Just give it a try!

Raft of Stars by Andrew Graff is an adventure story that I could not put down. This one really transports the reader to a very different place. ‘Fish’ and ‘Bread’ as they call each other, are 10-year-old summertime friends from very different life situations. Fish is loved, yet has experienced a tragic loss, while Bread has dealt with years of abuse from his father. Fish knows how scared Bread is of his dad, and one evening has the feeling he needs to turn around and check on him after he leaves him at home. A gun goes off, Bread’s father is shot, and the two boys take off on an ill-advised quest to travel many miles through dense forest and by river, supposedly to reach Fish’s father and get help. A new, inexperienced sheriff and Fish’s grandfather set off to find them, while Fish’s mother and a local young woman begin their own search. All sorts of trouble ensues, from thunderstorms to rapids, and finally a deadly waterfall.

Three O’clock in the Morning by Gianrico Carofiglio feels a bit quiet and contemplative in comparison to some of the others on this list, but it still had a lasting effect for me. Due to an epilepsy diagnosis, Antonio’s teen years have been negatively affected by restrictions placed on him by doctors. His father finds him a new specialist located in Marseille. Trips from their home in Italy to see this doctor force the two, who have not been close after a divorce, to spend time together. As Antonio nears adulthood, his doctor who believes he has outgrown the epilepsy, gives one last test: stay up for two days straight to try to trigger a seizure. During that time, father and son explore the city and talk about everything from literature to love, and subsequently learn to love and respect each other. The title is from an F. Scott Fitzgerald quote:
“In a real dark night of the soul it is always three o’clock in the morning.” 

Klara and the Sun by Kazuo Ishiguro
Saving my favorite for last! We meet Klara in the shop where, along with many other Artificial Friends (AFs), she is waiting patiently to be bought and taken home by a child who needs her. Klara is last year’s model, and worries she doesn’t have the features that will attract discerning kids, but Klara has gifts of perception and understanding that are beyond the usual abilities of AFs. Finally Klara is chosen by a very sick girl, and goes go live in a home where the mother’s attitude is puzzling. Slowly, Klara learns the truth about Josie and her late sister. You may feel that Klara is more human than any of the actual humans. The Guardian’s review stated: “People will absolutely love this book, in part because it enacts the way we learn how to love.” Love it I did!

Book Bites

As you can probably guess, there is one thing we like to do at the library more than anything else: talk about books!

That is why not being able to hold our book discussion group in person for so long has been a bummer. But never fear, we have found a virtual solution and titled it Book Bites.

This Tuesday, April 27th at 12 PM on our Crowdcast channel, a pair of Everett Public library’s finest will share a few of their favorite new titles and help you grow your reading list. Think of it as a way to connect with other readers in a quick, fun, and casual online gathering. Can’t attend on the day? You can view this discussion at your convenience on our Crowdcast channel after the event.

In addition to sharing our titles, we would love to hear what you have been reading as well. Feel free to participate and talk about books you have been reading (or are looking forward to reading) with our virtual community.

Just to give you a little preview, and so you don’t have to hastily write down titles, here are a few of the books that will be discussed:

So join us on Tuesday and get inspired to get reading!

Did You Know? (Pearl Edition)

The world’s largest pearl weighing in at 14.1 pounds was discovered in a giant clam off the coast of the Philippines in 1939?

I found this on page 46 of The Secret Life of Clams by Anthony D. Fredericks. I always thought that only oysters made pearls.

But the author tells us about a kind of giant clam, Tridacna gigas, that grew the largest pearl: “The Pearl of Lao Tzu” which is privately owned and valued at $93 Million! He also tells us that clams were on earth about 510 million years ago and some of these oldest clam fossils were found in late Cretaceous rock in Kansas and had actually grown pearls.

Razor clams are native to the Pacific Northwest. I couldn’t even begin to tell you how many times we dug clams when I was a child. My family loves clams and my mom cooked them so many ways. Razor Clams: Buried Treasure of the Pacific Northwest by David Berger shares similar stories of clamming with the family. He also shares many recipes that highlight these tasty critters. David doesn’t mention pearls, but I know in all of my time clamming, we never found any!

Many famous people loved pearls. Elizabeth Taylor owned a fantastic pearl, but it came from an oyster and previously belonged to Mary I of England, and then Elisabeth of France. Eleanor Roosevelt was famous for wearing her pearl necklaces as well. They were as smart looking on her as she was, and she was a strong and accomplished first lady. Eleanor Roosevelt: Fighter for Justice by Ilene Cooper has great stories about all the things she accomplished.

A completely different take on pearls are the Pearls Before Swine comics by Stephen Pastis. They are quite humorous, but not what one would necessarily call “pearls of wisdom.”

There are lots of mystery stories of stolen pearls and pearl necklaces. Geronimo Stilton stars in a fun series of books for kids. Cavemice, Paws off the Pearl is just one of many adventures that Geronimo and Thea Stilton have. Nancy Drew, The Thirteenth Pearl by Carolyn Keene has Nancy and her friends trying to find a stolen necklace.

Oysters: A Celebration in the Raw by Jeremy Sewall and Marion Lear Swaybill have done for the oyster what Anthony D Fredricks did for the clam. They show different varieties and explain the characteristics of each kind. If you are a fan of oysters, this will make you want to travel the world and try them all! They describe oysters like a fine wine with different hints of flavor depending on where they are from.

Lastly, don’t forget the rule of only eating oysters during a month with a “R” (September to April). This helps replenish oyster supplies by allowing their breeding in the summer and eating them in the cooler months gives them better flavor as well. But you can enjoy clams all year long!

Some Poetry for People Who Think They Don’t Like Poetry

As a longtime reader of poetry, somewhat lapsed of late, my poetic taste is informed for the most part by the work of American poets from the middle to the end of the last century.  “There’s no accounting for taste” is a phrase commonly encountered in the world of aesthetics, and the titles chosen here may indeed not be to your personal liking, but I have selected them because they consist mostly of short poems, generally have low barriers to entry, and frequently focus on some universal qualities of human experience – in other words, the hope is that the poems featured here will win over some of you who think that you do not like poetry.

While not limited strictly to the timeframe and geography mentioned above, this is not intended to be seen as anything other than a very small sampling. Most of these poets have received numerous major poetry awards and many of them have held the position of U.S. Poet Laureate.

The descriptions below come from the summaries in the library catalog, unless otherwise indicated.

New and Selected PoemsMary Oliver
New and Selected Poems
Mary Oliver’s poems offer vivid images and penetrating insights into the natural world melded with the joys and sorrows, flesh and spirit, of our fragile, time-bound human experience. The poems selected here are a great introduction for anyone new to Oliver’s luminous and resonant poetry.  -Scott

Sailing Alone Around the Room

Billy Collins
Sailing Alone Around the Room: New and Selected Poems
Whether old or new, these poems will catch their readers by exhilarating surprise. They may begin with irony and end in lyric transcendence. They may open with humor and close with grief. They may, and often do, begin with the everyday and end with infinity.

 

The Voice at 3 a.m.Charles Simic
The Voice at 3:00 a.m.: Selected Late & New Poems.
Charles Simic has been widely celebrated for his brilliant poetic imagery; his social, political, and moral alertness; his uncanny ability to make the ordinary extraordinary; and not least, a sardonic humor all his own. Gathering much of his material from the seemingly mundane minutia of contemporary American culture, Simic matches meditations on spiritual concerns and the weight of history with a nimble wit, shifting effortlessly to moments of clear vision and intense poetic revelation.

Kindest RegardsTed Kooser
Kindest Regards: New and Selected Poems
Firmly rooted in the landscapes of the Midwest, Kooser’s poetry succeeds in finding the emotional resonances within the ordinary. Kooser’s language of quiet intensity trains itself on the intricacies of human relationships, as well as the animals and objects that make up our days.

 

View with a Grain of SandWisława Szymborska
View with a Grain of Sand: Selected Poems
From one of Europe’s most prominent and celebrated poets, a collection remarkable for its graceful lyricism. With acute irony tempered by a generous curiosity, Szymborska documents life’s improbability as well as its transient beauty to capture the wonder of existence.

 

Garden TimeW.S. Merwin
Garden Time
W.S. Merwin composed Garden Time during the difficult process of losing his eyesight. When he could no longer see well enough to write, he dictated his new poems to his wife, Paula. In this gorgeous, mindful, and life-affirming book, our greatest poet channels energy from animated sounds and memories to remind us that “the only hope is to be the daylight.”

 

ReliquariesEric Pankey
Reliquaries
This book is Pankey’s most expansive, accessible and wide-ranging to date, and takes up subjects such as the death of family and friends, faith and doubt, beauty and the sublime, philosophy and art. Like a reliquary, each poem not only holds shards of memory, relics of the past, but each poem is a meditation upon the complexity of memory–its uncertainty and mutability, its precision and candor, its grave density and its ether-weight.

 

Bunch GrassRobert Sund
Bunch Grass
NW poet Robert Sund’s Bunch Grass, his first collection of poems, is set in the wheat and barley fields of eastern Washington where he worked for a season at a grain elevator.  He has an especially keen eye and a lively ability to condense details into a powerful whole. Readers will want to go on to explore his collected Poems from Ish River Country for his impressions of the lowland Puget Sound and Washington coast.  -Scott

 

The Best of ItKay Ryan
The Best of It: New and Selected Poems
Salon has compared her poems to “Fabergé eggs, tiny, ingenious devices that inevitably conceal some hidden wonder.” The two hundred poems in Ryan’s The Best of It offer a stunning retrospective of her work, as well as a swath of never-before-published poems of which are sure to appeal equally to longtime fans and general readers.

For a collection of essays that completely captures the sense of joy poetry can provide, take a look at Kay Ryan’s recent Synthesizing Gravity.

April is National Poetry Month (though anything worth celebrating for a month is worth celebrating all year), so settle in with some of these collections.  Or to browse our print poetry collections in the library catalog, click here.

Short Story Averse

While I’ve always loved short stories, I know there are some people who are hesitant to try them out. One of the major complaints I’ve heard over the years is that short stories are, well, just too short. You start getting interested in a set of characters and plotlines, the argument goes, and then everything seems to end abruptly and doesn’t resolve.   

While it is true that short story writers have less time to get their characters and ideas across, I’ve always found that good story collections have a consistent mood and style that makes up for the choppiness the reader might feel.  

I was reminded of this while reading three recent collections. While the tones are very different, each collection has a distinct feel. This unifies all the different characters and situations making the book seem like one long work where the characters and situations just happen to change. Read on to find out more. 

You Want More by George Singleton 

In addition to an outstanding cover, this collection is chock full of quirky characters, biting satire and absurd situations. While the stories are taken from the author’s 20+ year career, they are all grounded in the same tragicomic milieu. Set almost exclusively in rural South Carolina, the characters, and their dogs, are definitely unique. While hard to choose, I would have to say my favorite is “This Itches, Y’All” the story of a man haunted by his childhood staring role in an educational film about head lice, and the catchphrase that follows him to the grave. 

Bluebeard’s First Wife by Ha Seong-nan  

A sense of fear, mystery and unease permeates all of the stories in this excellent collection. While the characters are diverse (a young mother coping with the loss of her child, a policeman assigned to a rural posting, a couple distressed by noisy downstairs neighbors) there is always a sense of something disturbing and possibly violent, just beneath the surface. Ha’s use of simple and elegant language adds to this sense of a normalcy that isn’t quite right. “The Dress Shirt”, the story of a woman whose husband goes inexplicably missing, is a particular standout.  

The Low Desert by Tod Goldberg 

All of the characters in this gritty and darkly funny collection have hit rock bottom or are headed that way. Set in the desert lands of California, mostly in and around Palm Springs, each seems trapped in a noir film, sans the traditional ‘big city.’ A grifter with a fondness for karaoke and a bullet hole in his foot tries to dispose of a body; a professor of hydrology develops a super efficient sprinkler system and promptly takes to marijuana cultivation; a waitress hops from town to town trying to escape the inexplicable loss of her daughter. All told in a snarky and biting tone. 

So even if you are short story averse, why not give one of these collections a try? You will find them well worth your limited reading time.

Mushrooms of the PNW

Attention all fungi enthusiasts and budding mycophiles, a must see virtual program is headed your way. You definitely need to check out Introduction to Mushrooms of the Pacific Northwest this Tuesday, April 13th at 6 pm on the library’s Crowdcast channel.

Join Jeremy Collison, founder of Salish Mushrooms, for an introduction to mushrooming in the Pacific Northwest. This program is perfect for anyone curious about mushrooms. No mycology knowledge or previous foraging experience necessary. Learn about the basics of mushrooming in the Pacific Northwest, find out about native mushrooms, review basic safety concerns, and learn how to identify mushrooms using the inaturalist.org website.

Rest assured that we have plenty of resources and materials to support your mushroom enthusiasm, before and after the program. From books on mushroom identification, cultivation and just plain fungi fascination the library has got you covered.

So join us this Tuesday for a great program and think of Everett Public as your source for all things mushroom.