Best Music of 2015 … So Far

album montageWhile it might seem to some, myself included, that I’ve embarked upon my dotage, I do try to remain current in the music realm. Thus I eagerly await the Beatles reunion tour and wonder what Beethoven’s got cooking. But I jest. So here we are at the ¾ mark for the year and I’ve discovered a bucket full of outstanding albums put out this year. So many, in fact, that this will have to be a two-parter (Will Buck survive Ming’s deathray and carnivorous weasels?) … Well, maybe not a cliffhanger per se.

So, in no particular order, here are some of my favorite albums of 2015 thus far!

Down on Deptford Broadway by Skinny Lister
Skinny Lister’s music features ethereal Celtic folk melodies melding gracefully with rollicking rock and roll. As a reference point think of Dexy’s Midnight Runners at their best, and then think a bit better. These lads and lass, based out of London, have had a fair amount of success since their inception in 2009, and one listen to this album will show you why. 3 stars. Out of 3.

This is The Sonics by The Sonics
This album I’ve already blogged about extensively, so simply buy it, memorize my earlier post and pick your jaw up off the floor. Best album of the year. 3 stars. Out of 3.

No Cities to Love by Sleater-Kinney
Filed under Local Music, these riot grrrls are still putting out an aural assault worthy of a jumbo jet liftoff. Oh, and they write great songs too. Question: What happens when a local punk/indie/riot grrrl band plays together for nearly 20 years? Answer: This album. If you like it edgy and fast, then giddy up and go. 2.5 stars. Out of 3.

So Delicious by Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band
Perhaps my most surprising find of the year, this demon in the rough features a bluesy old-timey group that delivers fun and frivolity and furniture. Without the furniture. Imagine a pig caller shouting the blues while his band of hobgoblins lays down swamp boogaloo pulled from the very depths of hell. If you can imagine this you might want to seek therapy as soon as possible. But Reverend Peyton does bring music from the land of smoky kudzu-infested nights filled with passion, disappointment and whiskey. Check it out and expect to be mesmerized. 3 stars. Out of 3.

It’s Too Late Darling… by Guantanamo Baywatch
It’s very seldom that I find music I’ve never even heard of and get blown away. Enter Guantanamo Baywatch. Granted, my attraction to this album was the band’s name (hey, I’m a superficial guy), but without knowing the genre or anything about the lads and lasses, I discovered a new favorite. And this is one of the beauties of the library, looking into unknown works at no cost to yourself. Expect surf mixed with 50s/60s fun pop/rock. 2.5 stars. Out of 3.

Sundown Over Ghost Town by Eilen Jewell
One of the greatest voices currently putting out music,her gorgeous country music takes you to wide open spaces where the sun sets over hot-baked dirt, followed by crazy nights in crowded honky tonks. 3 stars. Out of 3.

Tune in for more 2015 albums in the near future. And keep your dune buggy off of my lawn, young whippersnapper!

Crazy Fall Publishing Part 3: September 15th

Hey, hey! We are halfway through the month of September and, incidentally, halfway through the absolute busiest time of the year for the library’s basement dwellers, aka cataloging staff. If summer is known as the time when all the blockbuster movies come out, fall is known in the publishing world as the origin of some of the most incredible new bestsellers. So sit back, relax, and get ready to fall in love with my top picks of books being released this week!

appearance of annie van sinderenThe Appearance of Annie van Sinderen by Katherine Howe
Summary: It’s summertime in New York City, and aspiring filmmaker Wes Auckerman has just arrived to start his summer term at NYU. While shooting a séance at a psychic’s in the East Village, he meets a mysterious, intoxicatingly beautiful girl named Annie. As they start spending time together, Wes finds himself falling for her, drawn to her rose petal lips and her entrancing glow. But there’s something about her that he can’t put his finger on that makes him wonder about this intriguing hipster girl from the Village. Why does she use such strange slang? Why does she always seem so reserved and distant? And, most importantly, why does he only seem to run into her on one block near the Bowery? Annie’s hiding something, a dark secret from her past that may be the answer to all of Wes’s questions
Why I’m stoked: IS SHE A GHOST?! I need to know, and that need to know is going to drive me to reading this one quickly.

DumplinDumplin’ by Julie Murphy
Summary: Sixteen-year-old Willowdean Dixon wants to prove to everyone in her small Texas town that she is more than just a fat girl, so, while grappling with her feelings for a co-worker who is clearly attracted to her, Will and some other misfits prepare to compete in the beauty pageant her mother runs.
Why I’m stoked: Any book to come along with a larger-than-average and confident heroine who is comfortable in her skin, who thinks that it’s society that needs to wake up and smell the coffee…well, how can I say no? Ever since I read Jane Green’s Jemima J. 15 years ago (OMG 15 years?!) I’ve been drawn to books where the protagonist either works on acceptance of her body or works on dealing with how everyone else responds to her. Reading strong female characters act with grace and humor when faced with the same type of adversity I myself have sometimes faced just gives me that much more determination to be the best me I can be.

lock and moriLock & Mori by Heather W. Petty
Summary: In modern-day London, two brilliant high school students, one Sherlock Holmes and a Miss James “Mori” Moriarty, meet. A murder will bring them together. The truth very well might drive them apart. Someone has been murdered in London’s Regent’s Park. The police have no leads. Mori and Lock should be hitting the books on a school night. Instead, they are out crashing a crime scene. Lock has challenged Mori to solve the case before he does. Challenge accepted. Despite agreeing to Lock’s one rule–they must share every clue with each other–Mori is keeping secrets. Sometimes you can’t trust the people closest to you with matters of the heart. And after this case, Mori may never trust Lock again.
Why I’m stoked: Another series featuring the world’s greatest detective, and this one sounds absolutely thrilling. Like many Holmes fans I have been utterly SHERLOCKED by Bennedict Cumberbatch’s portrayal of Mr. Holmes and so I have very high hopes for this modern-day tale. And series. Did I mention it’s a series? New series alert! *fangirl Kermit arms*

tonight the streets are oursTonight the Streets are Ours by Leila Sales
Summary: Seventeen-year-old Arden, of Cumberland, Maryland, finds solace in the blog of an aspiring writer who lives in New York City, but when she goes to meet him, she discovers that he is a very different person than she believes him to be.
Why I’m stoked: As someone who grew up in the dawn of online chatrooms, I sometimes found more camaraderie and acceptance with strangers through a computer than I did IRL. If there had been blogs then like there are now, I’m sure I would have had a really crazy one, stupidly confessing all to the world and hiding behind the faux security of “online anonymity.”  My point is that I am a sucker for the whole mysterious protagonist trope, and I am super-curious how this story twists when the heroine meets the blogger.

weight of feathersThe Weight of Feathers by Anna-Marie Mclemore
Summary: For twenty years, the Palomas and the Corbeaus have been rivals and enemies, locked in an escalating feud for over a generation. Both families make their living as traveling performers in competing shows—the Palomas swimming in mermaid exhibitions, the Corbeaus, former tightrope walkers, performing in the tallest trees they can find. Lace Paloma may be new to her family’s show, but she knows as well as anyone that the Corbeaus are pure magia negra, black magic from the devil himself. Simply touching one could mean death, and she’s been taught from birth to keep away. But when disaster strikes the small town where both families are performing, it’s a Corbeau boy, Cluck, who saves Lace’s life. And his touch immerses her in the world of the Corbeaus, where falling for him could turn his own family against him, and one misstep can be just as dangerous on the ground as it is in the trees.
Why I’m stoked: Family rivalries. Traveling shows. Star-crossed lovers. Magic! What’s not to love? This book is being billed as “magical realism,” something I’ve often heard but never truly understood. I can’t wait to get some first-hand experience with this genre.

How’s your TBR looking right now? Is it getting taller than you? Tell me what you’re reading now, and what you’re looking forward to reading. There’s always room for more books on my list!

Fictional Non-Fiction

One of the more frequent questions we get here at the library is: What is the difference between fiction and non-fiction? The question is usually grounded in the very real need to know where a book is located in the stacks. The practical answer is that both are shelved in separate sections: fiction by the author’s last name and non-fiction by the Dewey number. If you are of a philosophical bent and want to know why something is considered fiction or non-fiction, well that is where it gets complicated. It seems obvious that non-fiction is ‘real’ and fiction is ‘made up,’ but in fact there is more crossover than you might think.

Case in point is the weird and entertaining world of fictional non-fiction. These books have avoided the fiction label and are housed in the usually serious and reality based non-fiction stacks. They are unexpected gems of fancy, shelved alongside their more serious brethren. Listed below are a few topics that house a lot of this fictional nonfiction.

User manuals for technically non-existent, but really, really cool vehicles:

deathstarThere are a surprising number of workshop manuals, many put out by Haynes no less, for fantastic vehicles in the Star Wars and Star Trek universes. Whether you want to figure out how to kick start the Millennium Falcon’s hyperdrive, fix the cloaking device on a Klingon Bird of Prey, or find out where the holodeck is located on a Galaxy-class starship, we have got you covered. Whatever you do, don’t pass up the Imperial Death Star: DS-1 Orbital Battle Station manual. Sure death is in the title, but you have to admit that the Death Star was a marvel of engineering. If nothing else, this book will give you an appreciation for all the hardworking men and women, most of them just trying to collect a paycheck, whom the Rebel Alliance thoughtlessly murdered. Twice no less. Just saying.

Not self-help:

zonetheoryWhile it is true that actual self-help books can seem a bit odd, there is a small subset that are clearly not intended to be helpful, one hopes, and are played for laughs. One example is Tim & Eric’s Zone Theory: 7 Steps to Achieve a Perfect Life. From the creepy images throughout the book and advice such as ‘friends are replaceable, money is not,’ this book is funny and disturbing which is to be expected from the creators of several Adult Swim TV shows.

7secretsIf you’ve ever seen the show It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia, you know that none of the characters should be giving out life advice. But that is exactly what has happened in the book 7 Secrets of Awakening the Highly Effective Four-Hour Giant, Today. If you are still tempted to apply their maxims, take heed of the warning on the back cover: ‘Following the advice contained herein could get you arrested, maimed or killed.’

Alternative histories taken seriously:

federationSadly we don’t even have a moon base yet, let alone the wherewithal to set aside our differences and unify the people of earth, but if you want to read a future history where there is an actual Federation of Planets, definitely check out Federation: The First 150 Years. You also might want to brush up on The Klingon Art of War and read The Autobiography of James T. Kirk to prepare yourself for the brave new world to come.

timelordlettersWhile the library has lots of great books about Doctor Who, they tend to treat it as a television show that continues to be produced. True believers know that the Doctor must surely exist on some plane of Space/Time. For this select group we have The Time Lord Letters, a detailed collection of the Doctor’s correspondence including his application for the post of Caretaker at Coal Hill School to his telepathic messages to the High Council of Gallifrey.

Practical guides to fictional places:

portlandiaWhile Portland is an actual place, Portlandia is, well, a place unto itself. But don’t take my word for it. Instead check out Portlandia: A Guide for Visitors and learn about a city where Kyle MacLachlan is mayor, knots have their own store, and cars are not allowed. If you are feeling more hands on, definitely take a look at the Portlandia Activity Book to learn how to ‘Build Your Own Chore Wheel’ and ‘How to Crowdfund Your Baby.’

zombiesurvivalZombies may not actually exist at this point, but bad things have been known to happen. If you want to be safe rather than sorry and prepare for the coming undead hordes, the now classic Zombie Survival Guide is the book for you. Chock full of useful information (including ideal weapon selection, home preparation, and useful zombie weaknesses) this book will guide you safely, for the most part, through a fictional disaster. The one gap in this very thorough tome is nutrition. Luckily we also have The Art of Eating Through the Zombie Apocalypse which contains recipes as well as advice on how to get the calories you need to fend off the living dead.

End of Summer New Music Arrivals

The Internet coverSummer was a busy time for new releases and filling some gaps in our collection in regards to older material. Thanks to some excellent requests and donations from the public, we’ve added many Hip-Hop, RnB, Punk, Electronic, and Metal titles that we hope you’ll enjoy. If there was something you couldn’t find in the past, take another look because it may be on our shelves now; if not, reach out and make a request – we do our best to fill them because we want the collection to reflect the unique tastes of our community.

OK, that housekeeping aside, here are some highlights from last month’s new arrivals. The fall release schedule looks pretty exciting as well, so I’m looking forward to more goodies to come.

Four TetFour Tet – Morning/Evening (Text Records: Temporary Residence) – This album is laid out more like a cassette tape of a live PA than an album. Instead of the usual 10-15 songs, this release is divided into two long tracks. The first ‘side’ is a peppy, psychedelic dance party with Indian vibes. The second side was more downtempo and ambient to reflect the ‘night’ theme of the track. I appreciate this interesting take on the LP that seems to be an homage to the genre’s roots in live performance of electronic tracks on synths and drum machines.

Dj Rashad CoverDJ Rashad – Double Cup (Hyperdub)– For those who are not familiar with Footwork, it’s a genre of dance music that originated in Chicago. Tracks are fast and complex – meant to showcase a dancer’s skills as they improvise and adapt to the quickly-changing sonic landscape. One of the biggest names in the genre was the late DJ Rashad; this was his last album released before his untimely passing. In a genre that can be fast-paced and aggressive, Rashad’s sound often took a more atmospheric path, with heavy RnB, jazz, techno, hip-hop, house, and old-school jungle overtones. While these tracks are made to be mixed into DJ sets, Double Cup is a good stand-alone listen from start to finish; showcasing the talent that was lost too soon.

The Internet – Ego Death (Odd Future) – Whether you want to call this neo-soul or just soul, that’s up to you – new or old, this release has plenty of soul to go around. Tracks are a little on the electronic side, with jazzy, funky, harmonizing, dreamy melodies. Singer-songwriter Syd tha Kyd packs this album full of fun and sometimes blush-worthy lyrics taking you through the turmoil of love and sex, like the inner monologue of a turbulent relationship.

Grace Potter coverGrace Potter – Midnight (Hollywood Records) – Grace Potter and the Nocturnals front woman steps out in her first solo release, delving into the oft-maligned world of “pop rock.” This album provides nothing of depth, which is actually its strength. What’s inside is a collection of poppy, sometimes gritty tunes that at times reminds me of an 80s movie soundtrack. Think workout montage before the big day/match/dance meets Britney Spears slightly improved by a rock-and-roll makeover. You might dance, you may break a sweat, and your mood just might improve a little. Still not getting it? Place a hold and find out what I’m talking about.

Lower Dens coverLower Dens – Escape From Evil (Ribbon Music) – Classified as ‘dream pop,’ a genre I’m not familiar with, but who can keep up? I enjoy this album’s throwback sound, which makes me think a little of the Cure and the Talking Heads. This is a synthy, smooth, laid back album with very minimal vocals and a lot of groove. Great for a rainy evening at home as we dip into fall weather.

Sean Davis Jr. CoverSean Davis Jr. – Universes (Ninja Tune) – Another electronic mashup of styles. Downtempo rhythms with a strong funk undercurrent. Minimal vocals, and a bit of sass. There’s a bonus disc of beats that may or may not be of interest to you; kind of atmospheric puttering around, but enjoyable. It’s a Ninja Tune release – it’s hard to go wrong!

Hopefully something here tickles your fancy – place your holds now!

Crazy Fall Publishing Part 2: September 8th

Welcome to part 2 in the Crazy Fall Publishing series! If you’re just joining us, here’s the skinny: I’m highlighting the books being released each week that I am most excited to read. The list is totally subjective, but gives you an idea of what kind of ginormous TBR I have going on.

Without further ado, here are the hot new releases coming out this week I am just dying to dig into:

a is for arsenicA is for Arsenic: the Poisons of Agatha Christie by Kathryn Harkup
Summary: Agatha Christie used poison to kill her characters more often than any other crime fiction writer. Poison was a central part of her stories, and her choice of deadly substance was far from random; the chemical and physiological characteristics of each poison provided vital clues to the discovery of the murderer. Christie demonstrated her extensive chemical knowledge (much of it gleaned by working in a pharmacy during both world wars) in many of her novels, but this is rarely appreciated by the reader. Written by a former research chemist, each chapter takes a different novel and investigates the poison used by the murderer.
Why I’m stoked: I was actually required to read a Christie novel in high school, And Then There Were None. Ever since then I was totally hooked on mysteries, especially Christie, since she’s one of my mom’s favorites. As an adult I watched every single episode of Poirot with David Suchet that I could get my hands on. Since I can’t read any new Agatha Christie stories, reading the science behind her favorite plot device is the next best thing.

autobiography of james t kirkThe Autobiography of James T. Kirk by David A. Goodman er, Captain Kirk
Summary: This book chronicles the greatest Starfleet captain’s life (2233–2371), in his own words. From his birth on the U.S.S. Kelvin, his youth spent on Tarsus IV, his time in the Starfleet Academy, his meteoric rise through the ranks of Starfleet, and his illustrious career at the helm of the Enterprise, this in-world memoir reveals Captain Kirk in a way Star Trek fans have never seen. Kirk’s singular voice rings throughout the text, giving insight into his convictions, his bravery, and his commitment to life—in all forms—throughout this Galaxy and beyond. Excerpts from his personal correspondence, captain’s logs, and more give Kirk’s personal narrative further depth.
Why I’m stoked: To this day every time I see William Shatner, dressed as Captain Kirk or not, I hear my friend Jenny’s mom telling our 8-year-old slumber party, “He’s so sexy.” Not only was the first time I’d ever heard the word “sexy,” but it was also my introduction to the world of Starfleet and that dreamy Captain. I can’t think of anything better than reading this obviously true autobiography of the greatest man who hasn’t yet lived (give it a couple of thousand years).

the one thingThe One Thing by Marci Lyn Curtis
Summary: Ever since losing her sight six months ago, Maggie’s rebellious streak has taken on a life of its own, culminating with an elaborate school prank. Maggie called it genius. The judge called it illegal. Now Maggie has a probation officer. But she isn’t interested in rehabilitation, not when she’s still mourning the loss of her professional-soccer dreams, and furious at her so-called friends, who lost interest in her as soon as she could no longer lead the team to victory. Then suddenly somehow, incredibly, she can see again. But only one person: Ben, a precocious ten-year-old unlike anyone she’s ever met. Ben’s life isn’t easy, but he doesn’t see limits, only possibilities. After a while, Maggie starts to realize that losing her sight doesn’t have to mean losing everything she dreamed of. Even if what she’s currently dreaming of is Mason Milton, the infuriatingly attractive lead singer of Maggie’s new favorite band, who just happens to be Ben’s brother. But when she learns the real reason she can see Ben, Maggie must find the courage to face a once-unimaginable future… before she loses everything she has grown to love
Why I’m stoked: Terrible loss that is somehow reversed with a paranormal slant, and probably peppered with some romance that’ll give me all the feels? How could I pass this one up?

southern cookA Real Southern Cook: In her Savannah Kitchen by Dora Charles
Summary: In her first cookbook, a revered former cook at Savannah’s most renowned restaurant divulges her locally famous Savannah recipes—many of them never written down before—and those of her family and friends
Why I’m stoked: Ever since my husband and I pulled the plug on our cable TV two years ago, I have been mourning the loss of my access to The Food Network. I’ve been making up for my lack of visual cooking inspiration by devouring the cookbooks my boss buys for the library (um, not literally, weirdo!). In all my travels I can confidently say the best meals I’ve eaten were found in the South. I’m looking forward to trying my hand at recreating some of my favorite down-home meals in the comfort of my own home, where I can make a giant mess and Instagram the results.

sherlock holmes versus harry houdiniSherlock Holmes vs. Harry Houdini by Carlos Furuzono, et. al.
Summary: The world’s most famous detective meets the world’s most famous magician…and death ensues! Famed sleuth Sherlock Holmes and brash showman Harry Houdini must combine forces to defeat a mysterious mystic dedicated to destroying Houdini’s career and killing anyone who gets in his way.
Why I’m stoked: I’ve really gotten into comics and graphic novels in the last year or so, and I’ve always been a fan of both Sherlock Holmes and Harry Houdini. So really this just seems like a no-brainer, a natural progression of sorts. In fact, I’d go so far to say that it’s elementary, my dear Watson.

So that’s it for me this week. 5 books to add to my ever-growing TBR, my reading to-do list that will absolutely never end. What books are you excited for this week?

Same, Same, but Different

same-same-but-different--1I traveled to Thailand a few years back to visit my daughter who was taking a “Gap year” between high school and college. We met in Chiang Mai and did some touristy things like taking a cooking class and shopping for souvenirs. Lots of folks try to make their living by selling these souvenirs and a common call out is “Same same, but different!”  It’s a phrase used a lot in Thailand, and it can mean just about anything but originally meant “I have the same wares, but they’re better!”

You can use this phrase for so many things, but I like it in the context of books. Are you waiting in a long queue for the latest best seller? Well, your library has similar books which may keep you happy while you wait for the latest hot title.

Librarians are specially trained to help you with this very problem. It’s called ‘Reader’s Advisory’ in the trade and I’ll let you in on a few of our trade secrets. You’re probably familiar with Goodreads which is a social media reading site that can give you lists and lists of books on any subject imaginable. I like to use our library catalog which gives awesome suggestions for ‘similar titles’. There’s also a link to the database Novelist on our catalog. Your librarian can help you use these tools or simply do it for you.

Here are some ‘same, same, but different’ books for the currently most popular titles at Everett Public Library.

index (1)Are you longing to read All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr? Why not try The Nightingale by Kristin Hannah? This new novel is also set in Nazi occupied World War Two France and includes a love story. Two sisters are forced to test the strength of their courage and their love for each other as they each face the coming war in very different ways. Quiet Vianne has a husband who is fighting on the front lines and is terrified for their young daughter, yet she still manages to make her mark in her small town by standing up for what’s right in her own way. Headstrong Isabelle joins the resistance and fights the Nazis in each and every way she can. index (1)Neither of them will be the same by the time the war has ended. This was my first Kristin Hannah novel but it most definitely will not be my last. I was instantly drawn to the gorgeous cover and the intriguing summary on the dust jacket and decided to take a chance. I am very glad I did. Never have I read a book that told a story of occupied France in quite this way and from women’s perspectives too!

Nature of the BeastI just placed a hold for The Nature of the Beast by Louise Penny and I’m 25th in line! It must be good, but while I wait for it, I think that I’ll read the new Flavia de Luce mystery, As Chimney Sweepers Come to Dust by Alan Bradley. The Armand Gamache and Flavia De Luce mysteries are intelligent, character centered, cozies set in small towns. Although the time periods differ, the conversational tone and feel are similar. This Flavia de Luce mystery is even set in Toronto. They also share casts of eccentric secondary characters as well as unique investigators. Falva de Luce has been sent off to boarding school in Toronto; the same index (3)school her mother had attended. On her first night there, down from the chimney in her room a charred and mummified body drops. It has clearly been there for some time and the head is separated from the body. Flavia is determined to find out the victim’s identity and who killed her, but must also find out why girls are disappearing from the school without a trace.

index (1)I’m listening to Circling the Sun by Paula McLain and it is fabulous! It is the backstory of Beryl Markham, the first woman to make a transatlantic crossing from east to west solo. She was raised by her father in Africa and became that continent’s first woman horse trainer. There’s quite a line to get this beautiful novel, so place your hold and then check out Markham’s own book, West With the Night. When Hemingway read Markham’s book, he wrote to his editor, Maxwell Perkins: “She has written so well, and marvelously index (2)well, that I was completely ashamed of myself as a writer . . . [She] can write rings around all of us who consider ourselves as writers. It is really a bloody wonderful book.” First published in 1942, it’s just as remarkable today. Look for the illustrated edition. It’s loaded with wonderful photos of the author during her days in Africa. What more could you ask for than beautiful writing and a compelling story about the daring exploits of a spunky lady? Both of these books are well worth your time!

index (1)Now here’s a no-brainer: If you’re waiting in line for the wonderful new novel Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee, read (or re-read) To Kill a Mockingbird in the meantime. In fact, it makes sense to (re)read Mockingbird first as Watchman is set twenty years after the trial of Tom Robinson. The basic plot of this new sequel/prequel/first draft of To Kill A Mockingbird is that our beloved narrator, Scout (now Jean Louise), is now in her twenties and returns from New York to visit her father, Atticus, in Maycomb. However, Atticus has changed in these years and now hold views and opinions that greatly upset index (4)Jean Louise. Reading the first page of this novel you are immediately dropped into the familiar prose and voice of Lee’s masterwork. Maycomb is alive again in your hands. The novel simmers along at a steady pace as Jean Louise reminisces about her childhood in the town and about her life now. Then about half-way through the plot turns as we discover what Atticus has been up to. Unless you have been living under a rock, then you already know what I’m talking about but if you don’t know then I’ll tell you: He’s a big ole racist.

I could go on and on, but I think you get the idea: your librarian can help you find the perfect book, or even movie, to fill your needs while you’re waiting for that hot popular title. Come on in to the library to get your ‘same, same, but different’ book!

Spot-Lit for September 2015


Love-him-or-love-to-hate-him, the “Great American Novelist,” Jonathan Franzen is back with Purity, a novel of family secrets, complex characters and questionable intentions.

In other family-centered storytelling, Lauren Groff takes a hard, clear look at the surfaces and undercurrents of a decades-long marriage.

Fans of tell-all auto-fiction in the vein of Karl Ove Knausgaard’s My Struggle series will want to check out Elena Ferrante’s Neapolitan novels – The Story of the Lost Child, the series closer, is due out this week.

In dystopian novels, Margaret Atwood returns with a frightening story of economic collapse and totalitarianism, and Claire Watkins spins a dark tale about the changed social and physical landscape brought on by a near-future California drought.

Northwest authors Jonathan Evison and J.A. Jance have new books forthcoming. And a couple of first novels feature Northwest settings – Jimmy Bluefeather (Alaska) and Dryland (Portland).

Among other standout first novels there’s Did You Ever Have a Family by Bill Clegg (woman loses everyone and everything she loves in a house fire), and After the Parade by Lori Ostlund (setting out on one’s own after being paralyzed by loss and grief).

In the crime realm, look for the familiar-sounding The Girl in the Spider’s Web – a follow-up to the immensely popular Stieg Larsson books. And advance praise is raining down on The Killing Lessons, The Scribe and The Child Garden.

Fantasy fans will want to know that Jim Butcher’s starting a new series and might also want to take a look at Seth Dickinson’s Traitor Baru Cormorant. For readers of the supernatural, try Tananarive Due’s Ghost Summer.

Click the book cover montage below to see this list of titles in the library catalog, read reviews, or place holds.


Notable New Fiction 2015 (to date) | All On-Order Fiction.