My Journey Into Yoga

Enjoy a post today from Gloria:

I began my journey into yoga a few years ago. I was overweight and due to past injuries (broken leg, repeated ankle sprains, plantar fasciitis and osteoarthritis) I wanted to get some exercise that wouldn’t pound on my joints. I wasn’t sure of the commitment I wanted to give this new fitness, so I took a class with my local school district to see if it would be a success or failure. I discovered that yoga isn’t about success, failure or competition, it is all about the journey.

Listed below are some yoga resources that you might find helpful if you head down the same path as me.

The City of Everett Parks department offers many local yoga classes. The upcoming summer classes are listed in the Everett Parks & Recreation Summer Guide on page 16.

The library has a lot of great books and DVDs for the entire family that cover many subjects relating to yoga.

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Healing Yoga: Proven Postures to Treat Twenty Common Ailments – From Backache to Bone Loss, Shoulder Pain to Bunions and More by Loren Fishman came up in my search as one of Everett Public Libraries most popular yoga books.

Everett has a naval base here in the city, and I thought the book Yoga for Warriors, Basic Training in Strength, Resilience and Peace of Mind: a System for Veterans and Military Service Men and Women by Beryl Bender Birch would be a book our local warriors might want to check out.

Blending Yoga and fiction is a fun and lighthearted way to integrate the practice with a fun story. EPL has the Downward Dog Mystery Series by Tracy Weber.

Here are two Yoga memoirs complete with descriptions from the catalog to give you an idea of what they are about:

Yoga Girl by Rachel Brathen
yogagirlPart self-help and part memoir, Yoga Girl is an inspirational, full-color look at the adventure that took writer and yoga teacher Rachel Brathen from her hometown in Sweden to the jungles of Costa Rica and finally to a paradise island in the Caribbean that she now calls home. In Yoga Girl, she gives readers an in-depth look at her journey from her self-destructive teenage years to the bohemian life she’s built through yoga and meditation in Aruba today. Featuring photos of Brathen practicing yoga in tropical locales, along with step-by-step yoga sequences and simple recipes.

yogaandbodyimageYoga and Body Image: 25 Personal Stories About Beauty, Bravery & Loving Your Body by Melanie Klein & Anna Guest-Jelley
In this remarkable, first-of-its-kind book twenty-five contributors–including musician Alanis Morissette, celebrity yoga instructor Seane Corn, and New York Times bestselling author Dr. Sara Gottfried–discuss how yoga and body image intersect. Through inspiring personal stories you’ll discover how yoga not only affects your physical health, but also how you feel about your body.

There are many great Yoga DVDs available from the library. Here are three standouts:

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Yoga Journal. Your Daily Yoga 

Family Yoga

Yoga Journal. Living Yoga

My journey into yoga continues. I joined a gym and take regular Vinyasa (flow and breath) yoga. I even ventured into a Hot/ Bikram Yoga class where the first, very structured class was like being tortured in a sweaty sauna, and yes I went back for more. I continue to be interested in different classes and broadening my yogic horizons in mind, body and spirit.

Gloria

Your New Prince or Princess

Well, the new British princess has a lovely name: Charlotte Elizabeth Diana. I wonder if the royals consulted a name book before they chose so wisely. Did you know that the library has a parenting section which includes fabulous books on names and everything baby and child related? We use it often, especially when there are questions about children’s discipline, potty training, sleeping and eating issues. There are some really excellent titles in this collection and I’d like to share them with you here.

index (2)index (3)1,107 Baby Names that Stand the Test of Time by Jennifer Griffin will help you decide upon that perfect name for your prince or princess. This is where you’ll find Charlotte, Alice, William and Edward. If you’re looking for funkier names, check out Baby Names 2013 which will give you lists of the currently popular names.

index (1)Baby Day by Day: In-depth, Daily Advice on your Baby’s Growth, Care and Development in the First Year is published by Dorling Kindersley, so you know that it’s chock full of wonderful photographs. This is your guide for taking care of baby during the first year: basic information, day by day milestones, and everything about your baby’s health. You can rest assured, it’s all here!

indexCaring For Your Baby and Young Child: Birth to Age 5 put out by the American Academy of Pediatrics has all the information you may need to safeguard your child’s health. It includes sections on safety checks, all the common diseases, feeding and nutrition, and emergencies. Parents usually go out and buy a copy of this book once they lay eyes on it, it’s that good! Come check it out from the library before you spend money on your own personal copy.

index (4)Retro Baby: Cut Back on all the Gear and Boost your Baby’s Development with more than 100 Time-tested Activities by Anne Zachry is a great one! The baby product industry would have you believe that you need loads of equipment for a baby, but, do you really? The refreshing concept here is that you are your baby’s favorite play thing and this book is full of fun, money-saving activities that will set children up for lifelong success.

index (2)Having said that, sometimes you just need that crib or high chair and, hey, it all adds up, so check out the book Baby Bargains: Secrets to Saving 20-50% on Baby Furniture, Equipment, Maternity Wear and Much Much More! by Fields. It shows you the best web sites for discounts, name brand reviews, safety tips, and seven general tips on saving money. It costs about $10,000 just to equip a baby, so use this book and pinch your pennies.

index (5)Now here’s a book that’s on my bedside table right now: 1-2-3 Magic: Effective Discipline for Children 2-12 by Thomas Phelan. It’s also one that provides immediate relief to parents searching for help with discipline. I kid you not, I’ve had moms and dads hug me when I place this book in their hands. This program works like magic and it is quick and effective. It gives you keys to controlling obnoxious behavior, encouraging good behavior, and strengthening your relationships with your children. Magic!

indexindex (1)The most popular books on toilet training are Potty Training Boys the Easy Way and Potty Training Girls the Easy Way by Fertleman. This is fascinating reading for people who have this issue, let me tell you. It’s almost potty training season (summer), so reserve your copy today!

index (6)Recipes for Play: Creative Activities for Small Hands and Big Imaginations by Sumner and Mitchener will help fill your child’s days with inspirational activities. I want to try the jiggly eggs, play dough recipe and marble painting from the indoor play section and the garden soup, fairy housing, and bubble blowing from the outdoor section. There’s also the ribbon leash, the pom-pom pusher and the wallet wonder (for long car trips). This book is pure gold for creative ideas.

index (7)One book that has to be included on this list is How to Talk So Kids Will Listen & Listen So Kids Will Talk by Faber and Mazlish. This new edition of the bestselling classic includes fresh insights and suggestions as well as the author’s time-tested methods to solve common problems and build foundations for lasting relationships, express your strong feelings without being hurtful, engage your child’s willing cooperation, set firm limits while maintaining goodwill and use alternatives to punishment that promote self-discipline.

Come on in to the library and we’ll set you up with these or other great parenting titles.

Tie on Your Big Girl Shoes and Run

Motivation

Motivation

Though it often comes as a surprise to friends, family, and even total strangers, I enjoy running. If I were ever to take on a triathlon, the organizers would politely put me in the Athena or Clydesdale category. I, on the other hand, embrace the term fathlete. As you’ve seen from previous posts, I like to eat, but I like being active just as much. While these two things don’t seem to be at odds to me and others I’ve met with similar habits, some ‘healthier’ people can have a hard time not judging a book by its cover. An example: I recently had a yoga instructor at a retreat ask me if I did any physical activity at all when I told her I rarely practiced yoga. Her reaction when I told her I played ice hockey a couple times a week and was training for my third half marathon was worth the sting of her initial derision. Namaste.

This kind of ‘fitter than thou’ attitude is pretty prevalent in fitness literature. For folks like me, it’s hard to find resources that encourage a healthy lifestyle and at the same time don’t tell you how horrible it is to be in your body. So, to throw a bone to all my larger-than-life-fitties out there, I’ve compiled a list of non-judgmental helpful books to help you reach your goals.

Unapologetic Fat Girl's Guide to Exercise coverThe Unapologetic Fat Girl’s Guide to Exercise by Hanne Blank is a body-positive manifesto. Though the early chapters are aimed at motivating individuals who aren’t currently active, there are some nuggets of wisdom that everyone could use. I especially like her points on intent. Many people are active out of a vague sense of guilt that they should be doing something to improve themselves. Blank urges readers to move because they genuinely enjoy the activity, not because they feel it’s expected of them. There’s loads of other info in here about choosing the right activities, partnering up for success, selecting the best gear for your needs, and more.

The Runner’s Field Manual: A Tactical (and Practical) Survival Guide by Mark Remy is a great place to start if you’re interested in getting into running. This guide gives you advice on everything from knowing proper path etiquette, to how to run up an incline, to the proper way to run past roadkill without gagging. I appreciate that the authors and editors took the time to mix useful advice with a heavy dose of humor. The only thing that was lacking was information about proper nutrition while training – thankfully there were two other books ready to swoop in and answer all my questions.

Nutrient Timing for Peak Performance coverSomewhere in the back of my head there is a vague awareness that what you eat and when you eat it has a major impact on performance and progress. My lack of clarity on this topic probably explains why I actually gained weight while training for my last half marathon  instead of slimming down (here’s a hint: it wasn’t muscle building – it was the large pizzas I’d crave after training runs). Sports Nutrition for Endurance Athletes is a moderately-technical book that gets into the different nutrients found in foods, which ones you need to aid your performance and recovery, and what foods would be the best ones to consume. Nutrient Timing for Peak Performance takes things a step further and helps you figure out how much of what foods you need to consume before, during, and after different activities. My apologies upfront to anyone who dreads math – to use this book you’re going to have to crunch some numbers to figure out what plans are best for your build. I also appreciate the helpful meal plan examples at the end of the book to make things even easier.

Here’s a bonus book for those of you who are gluten-free and head-scratching at all these carb-heavy meal plans. The Gluten-Free Edge provides alternatives to the usual pre-event pasta dinners to help you on your way. Readers are also treated to a whole chapter of gluten-free recipes at the end to help put in practice all that you learn.

Healthy Tipping Point coverLastly, if you’re just looking to make some lifestyle changes to add more activity and a better sense of well-being to your life, Healthy Tipping Point has some really useful tips. While the main purpose of the book is to get the reader to make healthier choices for his or her own good, the author urges them to accept that thin and lean may not be the healthiest body type for each individual. More emphasis is placed on finding each individual’s healthy weight and physique, rather than trying to shoehorn people into the current popular perception of health and beauty.

My Stomach: the Strong, Sensitive Type

Cover image from The Intolerant GourmetI love to eat. I can demolish healthy foods, spicy foods, exotic foods, comfort foods, or the type of horribly unhealthy grub you’d find at state fairs. I take on all comers; the problem is, my digestive tract won’t. Last year I was diagnosed with a gluten sensitivity. Luckily I dodged the Celiac, allergy, and intolerance bullets (there’s a difference – link opens a PDF), but I still pay a price when I decide to snack on some doughnuts. Thankfully, the food industry in the States is rapidly becoming more gluten-free aware. Gluten-free products are springing up on store shelves and restaurants are adding new items to their menus. For all the cooks and bakers out there, there’s a wealth of new cookbooks being published every year.

Whether you’re avoiding gluten because your body hates it or you’ve decided to cut back for other health reasons, I have a list of books from our collection that I’d recommend checking out. I picked these titles because they all do a good job of explaining some things about being gluten free that can be confusing. Some cover the different reasons why people go gluten free, while others navigate the tricky waters of creating a dynamite gluten free flour mix for baking. Some of them have really handy lists of things you should and shouldn’t eat on a gluten free diet, while others have charts for properly cooking the different grains and beans being recommended in the recipes. I also like these books because they don’t rely too heavily on store-bought, pre-made items (gluten free breads, pastas, dressings, etc.) opting to teach you how to make those items in your own home instead. So, here is my list with some notes:

Cover image from The Gluten-Free VeganThe Gluten-Free Vegan by Susan O’Brien. This book has great explanations about being vegan, gluten free, and choosing organic goods. Those who are lactose intolerant or allergic to eggs may also find The Gluten-Free Vegan useful because it goes into alternatives products for cooking and baking. For those looking to cut back on refined sugars, there’s a section on organic sweeteners.

The Intolerant Gourmet by Barbara Kafka. Kafka stocked the back of this book with great charts for cooking times, water to grain/bean ratios, and more. This title is also a good pick for those who are lactose intolerant.

Cover image from Gluten Free 101Gluten-Free 101 by Carol Fenster. I think this title does the best job out of any of the cookbooks of introducing the reader to the reasons why someone might need to live a gluten-free lifestyle. You can tell that the author is speaking from years of experience and she is there to ease the reader through making the changes they need to make. Aside from the encouraging intro, the recipes themselves look delicious and easy to follow. While Fenster often uses canned ingredients in her recipes, cooks can easily substitute dried or fresh items at home if they want to avoid the extra sodium. Her emphasis in this book is on quick and easy recipes, so the shortcut makes sense.

Cover image for Gluten Free BreakfastGluten-Free Breakfast, Brunch, & Beyond by Linda J. Amendt. If you have suffered under any delusions that being gluten-free is an inherently-healthy lifestyle, this book will destroy them. Each chapter is sprinkled with glorious full-color photos of waffles, crepes, pies, and so much more to make you pack on the pounds. Use this resource wisely if you’re choosing to be gluten-free for weight-loss reasons.

Gluten-Free Whole Grains by Judith Finlayson. After learning I couldn’t eat wheat or rye without causing trouble, my eyes were opened to a world of grains I never knew existed. Reading through the lists of things that I COULD eat, all I could do was wonder how I was supposed to prepare them. This book is really helpful in explaining how to use both familiar and exotic grains in ways that show off their unique flavors and textures.

Happy cooking!

If I Could Turn Back Time

counterclockwiseExcuse me for inviting you to buy into our youth-obsessed cultural stereotypes, but have you ever wanted to look, feel, or actually be younger? Turns out all of these are possible, although the last may only happen if you lie about your age. Also, they take a lot of work, maybe more than you’re willing to do. Counter Clockwise: My Year of Hypnosis, Hormones, Dark Chocolate, and Other Adventures in the World of Anti-Aging by Lauren Kessler will take you along on one woman’s journey to reacquire youthfulness.

The author investigates and personally tries many ways to remain young, some of them expected and some quite surprising or relatively unknown. Of course many of the things she does are behaviors you’ve always been told will keep you healthy: eating unprocessed food, consuming more fruits and vegetables and, of course, exercise. Turns out these will also keep your body young. The goal is to keep your body healthy into old age and then suddenly die quickly, ideally in your sleep (and in bed with your much younger lover). Warning: don’t do it because Madison Avenue tells you to, do it because you want to be healthy.

Kessler learns about many different philosophies of eating with the goal of keeping you young for as long as possible. These include the idea of eating fewer calories than necessary-that is, semi-starving yourself for life. In studies, this practice has been shown to maintain the health and increase the longevity of rodents, but no studies have been done on humans. Guess they can’t find volunteers to be hungry the rest of their lives. No one would want to be around them, they’d always be so crabby.

She speaks with experts about the various food-specific diets that have you eat or avoid certain things. We also visit the big world of supplements. A lot of it seems natural, altruistic (they only want to make you feel better) and kind of hippie-granola-crunchy, but it is a big business with very little oversight.

And we can’t forget detoxification. Apparently we all need to do it, according to the popular press. The scientific community thinks it’s a load of bunk, and questions what it means and whether it is an effective or healthy activity.

Spoiler alert (but not really): Kessler finds that the things that work best to keep you young also keep you healthy and are the things your mother nagged you to do (or she should have). Don’t eat junk food! Get off the couch and get some exercise! Don’t let the TV turn you into a zombie (for real-brain activity and positive thinking can help keep you young and healthy)! Now go call your mom and thank her.

Did You Know? (Rabies Edition)

You almost certainly can’t get rabies from a squirrel?

squirrelsanswerguideSquirrels can get rabies but there has never been a documented case of squirrel to human transmission.

I found this information on page 130 in the book Squirrels: The Animal Answer Guide. I also never realized that prairie dogs are squirrels or that there are so many varieties of squirrels. You can see many of the varieties pictured in this book, or take a look at Squirrels of the West by Tamara Hartson. For younger kids, Squirrels: Welcome to the World of Animals by Diane Swanson will give them an inside the nest view of the daily lives of these cute little critters!

Rodents such as squirrels, rats, mice and prairie dogs have a genetic abnormality that  generally keeps them from getting rabies. In addition, squirrels usually aren’t around the other types of animals that carry rabies so their risk of exposure is very low.

genesanddnaAs scientists learn more and more about genetics and disease, they are understanding more about the role certain specific genes play in our health and familial hereditary. There are now many diseases that they can detect in your DNA. Genes & DNA by Richard Walker is a children’s book that is very well written and explains the basics of DNA, RNA, the double helix, and genes. It also gives examples that easily explain twins, disease, cloning and more.

rabidIt seems odd to think of a disease as deadly as rabies as being fascinating, but Rabid by Bill Wasik and Monica Murphy (which gives the history of rabies and the attempts by different societies to treat and prevent this catastrophic illness through the ages) was very enlightening. The factual accounts make it that much more interesting.

There are several famous fictional stories of rabies as well. Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neile Hurston and Old Yeller by Fred Gipson will touch your heartstrings, while Cujo by Stephen King is suspenseful and will keep you on the edge of your seat!

vaccineFortunately rabies is very preventable now because of the vaccines that our pets can be given, and the advanced treatments that someone can be given if suspected of being infected. Vaccine: the Controversial Story of Medicine’s Greatest Lifesaver by Arthur Allen is informative; it talks about the creation and uses of different vaccines throughout history, while telling us about the controversies and politics of immunizations at the same time .

 

Fitness for a New Year

Fear not it’s not too late! If you didn’t get a jumpstart on that diet or workout plan you intended to start January 1st, Everett Public Library is a good place to start. The library has a myriad of great resources to help you move into phase two- ACTION!

I will be honest here, I don’t like the words diet or workout. I am, however, tempted by terms such as ‘fit in 4 weeks’ and ‘shed pounds in 15 days.’ Truth be told I want to incorporate a sustainable and challenging workout as well as tweak my diet. Here are just a few motivators I found.

flat-belly-yoga-coverI don’t know exactly when it happened but sometime between now and then I developed a muffin top. Flat Belly Yoga describes a muffin top as subcutaneous fat, the fat you can pinch. The dangerous belly fat is visceral fat that can form around internal organs. For a simple straight forward approach to strengthening your core, Flat Belly Yoga offers good illustrations and instructions with minimal equipment needed.

A recent survey on fitness trends conducted by the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM) confirms that High-Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) continues to be the number one choice for getting and staying in shape, second to Body Weight Training. I briefly considered getting into a 30 minute Insanity class offered through Everett Parks and Recreation but I quickly talked myself out it! If you would like to get a taste for this type of work out, checkout the library’s P90-X Extreme Home Fitness DVD.

fireyourgymJust reading the introduction to Andy Petranek’s Fire your Gym!: Simplified High-Intensity Workouts You Can Do at Home confirmed my decision to start slow pacing myself. Andy is up front: you will be sore, no pain, no gain. Known for his Crossfit LA gym, in this 9 week at home program the author incorporates a high intensity workout, forefoot or barefoot style running, and recovery endurance conditioning. If you are looking to mix things up this book gives you the tools and template to stay fit.

bodyresetdietJuicing and the benefits thereof have been around for a long time. The Body Reset Diet offers a new twist – blending. Author Harley Pasternak breaks things down step by step asserting that blending is the key to resetting your body’s metabolism and maximizing the bioavailability of foods. As a person who has never met the daily requirement for getting my fruits and vegetables this book gives me hope. You will find recipes and an exercise programs to get you started.

extrememakeoverOne of my favorite exercise DVD’s is Extreme Makeover. Weight Loss Edition: the Workout. Fitness Instructor Chris Powell, touted as a transformation specialist, truly gives viewers a doable workout for various levels of fitness. In his latest book Chris Powell’s Choose More, Lose More for Life , Chris shares his own inspirational story along with a specific diet and exercise regimen.

ellensdancejamsWhen searching in the libraries catalog, type in a keyword search ‘physical fitness’, search by ‘any field’, limit by ‘DVD’, and I guarantee you will find a fitness DVD to match your interest from stretching to strenuous and everything in between. If DVDs don’t do it for you place a hold on Ellen’s I’m Gonna Make You Dance Jams featuring artist Macklemore, Usher, Aretha Franklin and more.

I’ve listed just a few titles in hopes that you will discover something new that motivates you towards a healthy and fit new year.