Easy Ideas for Literary Mardi Gras Gala Costumes

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Are you thinking of joining in on the Mardi Gras fun at the library this Saturday, but hesitant because of the costume piece of the puzzle? You can always ‘come as you are’, but I’d like to suggest some really easy author and literary character costume ideas for your inspiration.

You could come as Madeline, Virginia Woolf, or Mark Twain, but those costumes require some specific clothing. Here are some ideas which can come straight from your closet without any special purchases.

index (14)nancyLet’s start with a fun one: Nancy Drew. Throw on your favorite twin set, loafers, knee highs and head band and then simply grab a flash light and magnifying glass and you’re good to go. Check out a copy of one of Nancy’s mysteries and it’ll be super obvious who you are.

index (15)harrietIf you want a younger sleuth, try Harriet the Spy. You’d have a super comfortable evening in this costume: high tops, jeans, and a hoodie. Complete your ensemble with the obligatory magnifying glass, binoculars, flashlight and a notebook for chronicling all of your fun.

Wild cover imagewildDid you read Wild? This would be a sporty costume: Dig out your hiking boots, or maybe just one, and get your back pack, compass, and water bottle or map. Bingo, you’re Cheryl Strand. And you’ll have a very comfortable and athletic evening to boot.

index (16)31Ign0uBGbL._SL500_AA300_Simply don a pig snout to be one of the villainous swine from George Orwell’s Animal Farm. This is a super easy costume but, on second thought, it’d make it hard to eat and drink all evening. This costume has the added appeal of disappearing into your pocket when you’re tired of the get-up.

index (17)enhanced-buzz-8603-1380754592-12For the super lazy: Just get yourself a red “A” and slap it onto your long dress. Bingo, you’re Hester from the Scarlet Letter. Better still if you’re pregnant… This would be an elegant get up which would surely spark many a conversation. There. Done.

index (18)enhanced-buzz-4504-1380753969-28For the even lazier: Find yourself a name tag which says: “Hello.  My name is…” and instantly become Ishmael from Herman Melville’s Moby Dick. This is nothing short of brilliant because it is not only easy, but quite high brow as well.

index (19)enhanced-buzz-7265-1380754757-35How about the wildly popular Fifty Shades of Grey? Surely you’ve seen the photo of the fellow who has taped all sorts of paint chips onto his white t-shirt? Here it is. So fun! So easy! This just involves a trip to the paint store and some scotch tape.

index (20)Bridget-JonesHow about Bridget Jones from Mad About the Boy? This costume has the added advantage of doubling as your home movie attire for after the gala. No need to change clothes and you even have the wine and ice cream ready to go! Will someone please tell me why you need spanx with your pajamas?

index (21)Orange-is-the-New-BlackYet another easy idea: Orange is the New Black by Piper Kerman. The problem here is that you’ll need an orange jump suit and that’s not your typical closet staple. Maybe you’ll have to sneak out to the Good Will and just buy anything orange.

index (22)Night-CircusI love this idea: dress like you’re in the Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern. This would simply mean only wearing black, white, and red and perhaps painting your face white. This would be a very striking ensemble fit for a gala.

There are so many good ideas for easy literary costumes. Be sure to don one and come to this fun gala. Remember, it’s Saturday March 1 at 7:00 pm at the Main Library. Tickets cost $10 through Brown Paper Tickets or at the door. Enjoy a taste of Everett’s finest restaurants, coffee courtesy of Bookend Coffee, and a cash bar.

The WIld Snohomians will be playing for your listening and dancing enjoyment, and there will be prizes for the best costumes!

As always with Friends events, all proceeds will benefit library services for children and adults. Past Friends events have helped fund the Summer Reading book prizes, the teen area at the Main Library and book group sets.

I hope to see you there!

Stranger than Fiction – A Gala for Everyone!

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In the Thursday Next series, author Jasper Fforde has created an alternate Britain where literature plays a prominent role in day to day life. Children swap Henry Fielding bubble gum cards; there’s a branch of the police who deal specifically with literature-related crime; and people change their names and personas to that of their favorite author or literary character.

These people would fit right in the EPL’s upcoming Stranger Than Fiction Pre-Mardi-Gras Gala, 7 p.m. on March 1st at Everett Public Library, 2702 Hoyt Ave.

Come dressed as your favorite author or character–or just as you are–and enjoy a taste of great food from Everett’s finest restaurants and music by The Wild Snohomians. There will be a no-host bar, and prizes for the best costumes. Tickets will also be available at the door.

So help the library raise money, enjoy good food, spirits and music, and indulge your dress-up proclivities in one fell swoop! Personally, I might dress as Stephen King… Hey, I already am!

I Love Bernie (And So Will You)

This year I decided to give my reading life a little bit of direction and structure. Though I tend to prance through life with copious amounts of chaos, I decided that I could and would cram in some reading goals for 2014. Why not stretch my mind a little? Though I’ll still be reading fun, fluffy, and frivolous books (currently reading a YA spy thriller) I thought if I mapped out my year I could easily shift in some unexpected titles and see how well I do following directions, even if they are from myself. I detested assigned reading in school but I’m hoping that taking orders from myself will go over better.

Yeah, I’m a hot mess.

Let me recap for you what I’m calling my 2014 Reading Resolutions:

  1. Read something a library patron recommends
  2. Read this year’s Everett Reads! book (see below)
  3. Read something difficult, either due to subject matter or writing style
  4. Read an award-winning book
  5. Read something that is super-popular
  6. Read a book that was the basis for a TV series or movie
  7. Read a classic work of literature
  8. Read an annotated classic work of literature
  9. Read something that will help me plan for the future
  10. Read something that will help me reconcile the past
  11. Read a graphic novel
  12. Read an entire series that is new to me

wheredyougobernadetteThis month I decided to tackle the Everett Reads! book. As Kate mentioned already, Where’d You Go, Bernadette by Maria Semple is what we’re hoping all of Everett will try this month. On February 23rd at 7pm Maria will be at the Performing Arts Center downtown. We’re told she’s a very engaging and entertaining speaker, and those who wish to meet her/have a book signed afterwards will have that opportunity. Oh, and did I mention it’s FREE?!

We’ve been doing this “one book for the whole community to read” type of program for several years now. The first year we read The Maltese Falcon by Dashiell Hammett. I love mysteries, so that year I read the book, discussed it with colleagues, and went to the programs offered. In the intervening years I didn’t really get excited about any of the other titles. That’s not to say they were bad books. They just didn’t capture my interest.

This year everything changed. This year we picked a book that was funny.

I’m not great at summarizing stories without giving anything away. What you should know is that, although everyone told me this book is all about teenager Bee searching for her mother Bernadette who just disappeared, it’s so much more than that. I checked out the eBook edition and Bernadette didn’t disappear until about 2/3 of the way through the book. While many books heavy on exposition and background can be tedious and overbearing, it’s just not the case here. The writing is laugh-out-loud hilarious, the best lines coming straight from Bernadette herself:

Greetings from sunny Seattle, where women are “gals,” people are “folks,” a little bit is a “skosh,” if you’re tired you’re “logy,” if something is slightly off it’s “hinky,” you can’t sit Indian-style but you can sit “crisscross applesauce,” when the sun comes out it’s never called “sun” but always “sunshine,” boyfriends and girlfriends are “partners,” nobody swears but someone occasionally might “drop the f-bomb,” you’re allowed to cough but only into your elbow, and any request, reasonable or unreasonable, is met with “no worries.”

Have I mentioned how much I hate it here?

The whole story is told through varying forms of communication: school memos, emails, faxes, magazine articles, and even a captain’s report from a cruise ship. This structure really held my interest and also provided deep insight into each characters’ motivations, feelings, and personalities. That’s a really tricky thing to do well in a book but Maria Semple pulls it off.

Unfortunately this format can be tricky to follow when listening to the audiobook, as one of my colleagues discovered. So I would suggest if you’re getting lost or losing interest in the audio, grab a hard copy of the book and try that instead. Give Bernie a chance to win your heart like she did mine.

Where’d You Go, Bernadette (yes, it bothers me that the official title does not include a question mark) has something for everyone. Bernadette’s husband, Elgie, is an avid cyclist, so this will appeal to my friends who bike to work. Elgie also works at Microsoft, and the book goes into great detail about life on a business campus. I read these parts out loud to my software engineer husband. There’s a lot of coverage of the school Bee attends and the moms Bernadette refers to as “gnats” since they’re annoying but nothing you’d really exert effort over (hello, all my parental friends who have experience in the trenches). Ever been on a cruise? Deal with motion sickness? You’ll be nodding your head (nothing that would trigger that horrible nausea feeling, though). If nothing else, this book is a great fit for anyone who has had a complicated relationship with their parents (who doesn’t?) and, of course, any humor fans.

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I want to hear from you. Are you joining your neighbors in reading Where’d You Go, Bernadette? I’d love to see you all pack the house at the Performing Arts Center on Sunday, February 23rd. The program starts at 7pm but if you want the good seats you’ll want to get there a little early.

If Bee can search the ends of the earth for her mom, surely all of Everett can enjoy the same book.

Movie’s Better VI: the No-Need-for-a-Book Edition

Rocky PosterIn the column thus far, we’ve explored adaptations that surpass their source material. This month’s screening (October 23rd at the branch) of Rocky got me thinking of movies that came out of nowhere. It has been estimated that between a third and 65% of all films came from a book of some sort. But some of the most important films ever made came from the creator’s heart, soul, and, in the case of Rocky, guts.

An underdog film made with pure heart about that very subject. Sylvester Stallone did not see success quickly. Sly cleaned a lion’s cage, was cast in roles like “subway thug #3,” and even appeared in an adult film to make ends meet. Inspiration struck and he hammered out a screenplay in 3 days after he saw Chuck Wepner knock down the invincible (and 40-1 favored) Muhammed Ali and then go 15 rounds until his triumphant loss. Stallone fought to get the film started and then made, trimming and rewriting scenes to work with the non-existent budget. Hunger makes for inspiration; it also was the only way Stallone could afford extras for the fight scenes–they were there for a chicken dinner. There’s so much more to this linchpin underdog story and we’ll discuss it all on Wednesday at 1:30.

For more evidence to support the “no need for a book” argument (though I wouldn’t be much of a librarian if I didn’t truly love them), I shall list a few more sterling examples, without even mentioning the most important movie ever made:

ModerntimesCharles Chaplin: He directed (and scored, his music is underrated because every other aspect of his films is so brilliant) his original screenplays. They’re all worth seeking out, with special mention to  Modern Times & City Lights.

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Preston Sturges: The man who birthed the modern romantic comedy with his terrific screwball comedies, where every laugh is intelligent and earned. They’re all brutally funny and clever, but especially Sullivan’s Travels & Palm Beach Story

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Modern Times: The list goes on and on and suggesting no chronological end. And we’re not just talking about Oscar-winning throwback The Artist. 

But a few more: Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind, Pan’s Labyrinth. the work Pan's Labyrinthof British master Mike Leighthe list goes on and on and on… 

…and  I’m still not mentioning the 
citizen-kanemost critical artistic statement in the history of film, but I would be remiss (and not much of a librarian) not to include a poster with a link to our catalog.

Seek the Unknown – Teen Writing Competition

Are they protecting the tree, or bracing themselves as something approaches from above?

Are they protecting the tree, or bracing themselves as something approaches from above?

Photographs.They exist in almost every household: hidden in attics, growing mildewy in basements, or tucked away on closet shelves. Sometimes they turn up at rummage sales or antique stores, completely divorced from anything that could possibly identify them. If we’re lucky, they wind up at the library with names, places, and dates marked clearly, but more often than not they arrive here orphaned and anonymous. It’s been said that every picture tells a story (thanks Rod Stewart), or that a picture is worth a thousand words; we’re hoping that’s the case, because we’d like our local teen authors and artists to tell stories with our amazing collection of archival photographs.

Kids at play, or kids escaping a pit of alligators? You decide.

Kids at play, or kids escaping a pit of alligators? You decide.

In honor of Teen Read Week, which runs from October 13-19, the Everett Public Library is hosting its second annual fall Teen Writing Competition for Everett students in grades 6-12. Last year’s competition brought in almost 50 entries and resulted in a read aloud night at the Bookend Coffee Co. where some of our winners read their work. Cider and a good time was had by all. You can check out videos of those stories on our YouTube channel (the volume is a bit low on the vids, so be sure to turn them up).

This year we’re hoping that our authors and artists will be inspired by images from our collections to create ‘found photo’ stories. What that means is that characters, places, and events in your stories should be inspired by images found in our collections. In order to let imaginations run wild, we’ve pulled a selection of our photos from our archives, stripped all information from them, and arranged them in this Flickr collection*. Thousands more images can be found on our Digital Collections site; these can be used with or without the identifying information attached to them. From there, we’re looking for either a written story illustrated with as many of our photos as you want, altered in any way you want, or a graphic novel/comic created using them. Competition winners may be featured on the EPL’s site, blog, and at an event at the library in 2014.

Friends posing for a funny photo with props, or a remorseless group of train robbers, laughing about their latest haul?

Friends posing for a funny photo with props, or a remorseless group of train robbers, laughing about their latest haul?

For an excellent example of a found photo story, we highly recommend reading Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children, by Ransom Riggs (we recommend reading it even if you don’t intend to enter the competition – it rocks).

For more information about our competition, including all the guidelines, rules, entry form, and other official stuff, visit our Teen Read Week page. Entries must be received by October 31st at 5pm to be considered, and can be dropped off at either branch or emailed to llabovitch at everettwa.gov. Be sure to keep a copy of your story for your own enjoyment (preferably your original if you’re creating any artwork with it!). Happy storytelling – we’re excited to see what you come up with!

*At the end of the competition we’ll add any information we have about the Flickr photos to their descriptions so you can learn a bit more about them.

National Reading Group Month

October is National Reading Group Month and a great time to think about starting a book group, joining one or changing how your current group functions. Tips for Book Groups can help in planning for a new group or in enriching the discussions in your existing group.

bookgroupsets2The library’s book group collection has sets of good books for discussion that can be checked out with a discussion packet.  Browsing the book group titles has just become easier with the library’s new KitKeeper option. Simply go to www.epls.org and click on the box that says Book Group Sets. Titles can be reserved online and you will receive an email confirmation of your reservation and another email when the set is ready for you to pick up.

We will be adding five new titles to the book group collection soon. You might want to consider one of these for your group. I’ve included a brief synopsis of each title and possible ideas for further discussion:

The Art of Hearing Heartbeats by Jan Philipp Sendker
artofhearingheartbeatsWhen a successful Wall Street attorney disappears, his adult daughter Julia travels to his native Burma (Myanmar) hoping to find him. When she arrives a mysterious man approaches her and begins to tell her a story. He asks if she believes in a love that knows no bounds. She doesn’t know how to answer – is he speaking of romantic love or the love one feels for a child. As the story unfolds she finds out. Discuss the themes of love and death in this book and how Burmese and Western attitudes toward love and death differ. Think about why this particular title was chosen for this book. Consider the ambiguous ending and how Julia will face the future.

The Art Forger by B. A. Shapiro
artforgerClaire Roth is a struggling artist who agrees to create a copy of a painting at the request of a friend – an act that has serious repercussions for herself and the people she cares about. Discuss the characters in this book and what motivates them. Why does Claire make the decisions she does? What else could she have done? Several other characters also make questionable decisions – what motivates them? Talk about the book’s structure. The author inserts letters from the past throughout the book. What is the author trying to do by inserting these letters? How do they relate to the rest of the story? Do they enhance the story or detract from it?

In Falling Snow by Mary Rose MacColl
infallingsnowYoung Australian nurse, Iris Crane travels to France to find her 15-year-old brother who has run away to fight in World War I. Once there she meets a woman who is a doctor and who is setting up a hospital near the front for the war wounded. Iris joins the hospital staff and has a very intense experience for several years. Much later her granddaughter learns the whole truth about what happened in France so long ago. Discuss the life-changing decisions that Iris makes and whether you agreed with her decisions. Could you have done what she did? An issue in this book is the lives and choices of women. Compare the lives and choices of Iris and her granddaughter.

Sweet Tooth by Ian McEwan
sweettoothAn English woman is recruited into the British Secret Service in the 1970s during the Cold War. She is given the assignment of cultivating a novelist who will – it is hoped – write novels with messages the Services thinks are appropriate. This is a book about deception and betrayal. Talk about who is deceived and betrayed. How did you react to the deceptions and betrayals? Consider how the story speaks to the issue of intellectual freedom. Is this topic still relevant today? With the book’s ambiguous ending, reflect on how you wanted the story to end.

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The Mirrored World by Debra Dean
In this tale of love and devotion set during the reign of Catherine the Great of Russia, Xenia, a young aristocrat, reacts dramatically to tragedies in her life. Discuss whether Xenia was mad or simply devout. Talk about the significance of the title. Consider reading and discussing Catherine the Great by Robert Massie first as it will expand your understanding of The Mirrored World.

Marge

Free Author Talk Featuring Daniel James Brown

indexMark your calendar for 2 PM Sunday, October 13th for a special visit with Daniel James Brown, author of the New York Times bestseller, The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Olympics. We have moved this talk from the library auditorium to the Everett Performing Arts Center as there is sure to be a large crowd in attendance. Books will be available for purchase and signing.

This book is a pleasure to read. It tells the story of the University of Washington’s 1936 eight-oar crew and their epic quest for an Olympic gold medal. They were a team that transformed the sport and grabbed the attention of millions of Americans.

The book’s focus on the lives of the crew members makes this much more than a sports book. The team members struggles to make money and stay in school tell a compelling history of the depression in Washington state, and the alternating chapters detailing the Nazi’s preparation for the 1936 Olympics in Berlin make the climatic chapters of the big race even more compelling. At times the book reads like a suspense novel, even though we know the ultimate result from the start of the race, the results of key races leading to the 1936 Olympics are unknown until we read them at the end.

The story of the central character, Joe Rantz, and his battle with personal and family demons brought life to the book. Joe’s story is one of resiliency, and is a testament to how individuals can overcome humble and tragic beginnings. The cast of characters is amazing. The coach Al Ulbrickson and boat builder George Pocock are just as important as the other eight in the boat. You will be pulling for them all.

Here is the official book trailer which is a good synopsis of the story with actual footage of the crew and lots of great still photos.

I hope to see you at this great author event on October 13th!

Self-Help and Humor or If I Told You Where the Self-Help Books Are, It Would Defeat the Purpose

Please prepare yourself. I’m going to blow your mind: we at the library love to read. We read everything from fiction to biographies to cookbooks and history. So it should really come as no surprise that we love to talk about books just as much, if not more, than actually reading them.

Occasionally we’ll have a staff meeting focused solely on discussing one type of book. What did we like? What did we not like so much? What’s popular in our community?

This past week we discussed self-help books. In addition to facilitating our discussion, Marge prepared a list of 50 authors to know in the self-help world. She also shared an article by Daniel Lefferts with an overview of the top self-help books to take into 2013.

           

In preparation for this discussion we were asked to think about what self-help books we’d recommend to others. Turns out I don’t really read many of them now, although according to GoodReads I have rated a lot of them in the past. I wondered why this might be. What do I do, in my 30s, that I didn’t in my 20s when I read all those self-help books? The answer slowly appeared, as if from a magic 8 ball: I’m way into stand-up comedy.

That’s right: I worship at the altar of hilarity, where the main dogma is, “Laughter is the best medicine.” Feeling down? Try a stand-up routine! I guarantee it won’t solve the underlying problem you’re currently moping over, but it will lift your spirits and maybe even give you the confidence to face your problem head-on.

My husband, Chris, and I decided this would be the year we’d go out and see some of our favorite comedians up-close and personal. Would the real-life experience stack up to the edited versions we’d heard on CDs, podcasts, and on TV? Turns out that, like most fascinating things you see on TV, the reality is just bigger and more satisfying in person.

Our favorite show so far this year has been finally getting to see Jim Gaffigan. Jim was at the Paramount back in July and we had front-row seats and got to meet him after the show. In case you weren’t aware, his persona centers on the fact that he is very pale. One of my favorite albums is Beyond the Pale, and he co-starred with Conan O’Brien in an animated short series called Pale Force, where their paleness is over-exaggerated for comedic effect. That paleness is also the source of their superpowers.

Anyway, after the show as Jim reached out his arm to shake my hand, he smiled and said, somewhat gleefully, “Oh, you’re pale, like me!”

Day. Made.

All the way to Seattle, and walking to the theater, I had made sure to impress upon Chris that I was going to ask Jim if we could pose in a photo with all of our arms turned out to show how pale we all are. When the time came for us to take a photo, I mentioned my idea, that I would love it if we could all three stick out our arms, etc. etc. This is exactly what he said:

“Oh now, I think I win. And…I didn’t want to win.”

Well we did a visual recount and I think you’ll agree that I am actually the victor. And to the victor, goes the sunscreen. He then asked to take a photo with our faces so we could remember who the palest was.

Gaffigan ArmsGaffigan GroupI didn’t solve any of my problems that night, but I did have a great experience and an amazing time with my husband. We made some memories and laughed until we cried. That kind of emotional release can, I propose, be even more helpful than reading a detailed book about how to organize your life, or lose weight. And let’s be honest: it takes much less time to watch or listen to stand-up than it would take to read the latest self-help tome.

But you don’t have to take my word for it. Try some of the comedy your library has to offer. I suggest the following: take two stand-up routines and call me in the morning.

Carol

Movie’s Better V: Noir Edition

Double I stillOften, when I’m in the right (or wrong) mood, I’ll raise some Cain…James M, that is. He perfected the hard-boiled literary style: books about crime & criminals written with precision, brutality, and distance.The adaptation of one of his masterpieces, Double Indemnity, however is an improvement. This would be a pretty short blog post if it wasn’t, wouldn’t it?

After World War Two, we lifted an embargo and our books and movies flooded into France. Perceptive, they sensed trends in theme and style and labeled the books a “serie noir” and the movies “film noir.” The books, by authors like Raymond Chandler, Cornell Woolrich, and Horace McCoy, are considered classics of the hard-boiled style. The films comprise a movement that is considered the most artistically important in American film history.

Double I CoverIn 1939, James M. Cain wrote Double Indemnity, a novel as elegant and brutal as a rusty nail about an insurance cheat perpetrated by a wife, with help of a clever, but weak-kneed insurance man. Like the film, it’s told from the perspective of our doomed anti-hero.
The 1944 adaptation is considered the most important film in the film noir style. Not only was it directed by one of cinema’s greats, Billy Wilder. But he and his writing partner Brackett had none other than Raymond Chandler to improve the story and add his inkily cynical humor to a story that richly benefits from it.

A line from the novel: “Maybe that don’t mean to you what it meant to me. Well, in the first place, accident insurance is sold, not bought. You get calls for other kinds, for fire, for burglary, even for life, but never accident. That stuff moves when agents move it, and it sounds funny to be asked about it.”

Double I Movie PosterAn exchange from the film: “Walter Neff: You’ll be here too? Phyllis: I guess so, I usually am. Walter Neff: Same chair, same perfume, same anklet? Phyllis: I wonder if I know what you mean. Walter Neff: I wonder if you wonder.”

It’s easy to see that the film greatly improves the verbal style. But what of the visual style? Roger Ebert lauds: “The photography by John F. Seitz helped develop the noir style of sharp-edged shadows and shots, strange angles and lonely Edward Hopper settings.”

And we know it’s a classic, but how was it received in 1944? Alfred Hitchcock (yeah, him): “Since Double Indemnity, the two most important words in motion pictures are ‘Billy’ and ‘Wilder.’”

Come see what they were (and what we will be) talking about in our “Best of the Best” film series, as we screen and discuss Double Indemnity on Wednesday, September 25th at 1:30 PM. A repeat screening at 6:30. See what’s playing and cast your vote today at http://www.epls.org/films/.

The Book Club Spectacular

bookclubspectacularHave you been pondering starting up or joining a book club? Perhaps you already belong to a book group and just want some fresh ideas regarding book selections or discussion topics.Either way the Everett Public Library has an event for you.

ahomemadelifeThanks to the Friends of the Everett Public Library, this Saturday, September 21st, the library will be hosting a Book Club Spectacular starting at 10:30 am at the Main Library in the auditorium. Like all good spectaculars, ours will have a special guest star: author Molly Wizenberg.

delanceyMolly is the author of the New York Times bestseller A Homemade Life and the award winning blog Orangette. At the spectacular she will be talking about her forthcoming book Delancey and the first 75 attendees will be receiving a copy. In addition, those attending can enjoy refreshments based on Molly’s recipes from A Homemade Life.

But that’s not all. An Everett Public Library veteran book discussion leader will be there to talk about titles that make for great book club reads as well as tips for leading your own book club discussions. You can also get a sneak peak of the Library’s new online system for reserving book group sets. And don’t forget to bring gently-read books to exchange with your fellow book club enthusiasts. No registration is required and, as always, this library program is absolutely free.

If you need further book club inspiration, check out Leslie’s post Do You Book Club? Whatever you do, don’t forget to mark your calendars and bring your excitement for all things book to the Book Club Spectacular this Saturday.