About Leslie

When I'm not reading non-fiction or a good novel, I read a lot of picture books to myself, my grandchildren, and children at the library.

Kid’s Music: Old and New Favorites

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I’ve been listening to children’s music ever since my children were little and my son turns thirty this week! Back then, we loved Raffi, Disney songs and Pete Seeger. Children’s music has come a very long way in recent years. I know because now I listen to music with my granddaughters and the children in story times at the library. I also purchase the children’s music CD’s for the library. It’s important to know which artists can pass both the kid’s and adult’s quality tests. By this I mean that young children will listen to the latest Disney songs (FROZEN) for ever, but you may not want that in your home or life. Here are some artists which I listen to alone. By myself. Willingly.

indexQM6GB4RGMy absolute favorite children’s recording artist is the fabulous Elizabeth Mitchell. Her compact disc You Are My Little Bird is so wonderful that you can just leave it in your CD player because it is primarily acoustic and purposefully low-key, which allows the melodies of her songs to shine through. Mitchell’s singing is elegant, unforced, and a thoroughly natural pleasure to listen to.

seedElizabeth Mitchell has been lending her lovely voice to folk-leaning indie rock for years, and in recent years she’s been displaying the same intelligence and playful joie de vivre on a handful of recordings for children. Her album Little Seed: Songs for Children by Woody Guthrie collects recordings of Mitchell’s interpretations of the legendary folksinger’s songs.  What a pleasure!

nancyNancy Stewart is a children’s singer-songwriter based in Seattle and be sure to check out her fabulous website. This website is dedicated to providing FREE songs, resources and information for teachers, parents, librarians, and home schooling families. You can download her music onto a CD or just click and play. I get so many wonderful tunes from Nancy and you could too.

index (2)I asked my fellow children’s librarians who their favorite musicians are and one loves the Laurie Berkner Band. I do too!  It doesn’t get much better than the Best of the Laurie Berkner Band which features twenty tracks taken from her first five albums. It’s bouncy and fun. The production and performances are top notch which makes it music for all ages.

indexT4OJMRVKJim Gill is the favorite children’s music artist for two of our librarians. He is a nationally acclaimed author and musician who has received five separate awards from the American Library Association. Studies have shown that there are many connections between music, play and literacy. This is wonderfully playful music for the little ones in your life.

indexX12JJSPSSome of my favorite CD’s are from Putumayo Kids. This world music label is dedicated to providing high-quality music played by traditional and contemporary artists. You must listen to Hawaiian Playground if you’re making a trip to the islands or just want to pretend by listening to the song “Come to Hawaii”. Just try to get the tune of the “Cockeyed Mayor of Kaunakakai” out of your head.

indexB8E1SJGCLikewise, check out Cowboy Playground if you’re driving to Idaho or Montana or any other horsey place out west. You’ll love singing along with “Back in the Saddle Again”, “Don’t Fence Me In” and “Happy Trails.”  It was perfect for my cowboy storytime.

indexH51ZRUETAnd who can resist Reggae Playground? This is an outstanding album for children and moreover an entirely enjoyable album for adults also. There are excellent performances all through this upbeat offering which does not dumb-down music for children. Everett Public Library has no less than 28 Putumayo Kids CD’s, so there’s sure to be one to your liking in the bunch.

index (3)Caspar Babypants has a new CD of Beatles music for children and it’s marvelous!  He’s also coming to the Main Branch of the Everett Public Library on Wednesday, December 10th at 10:30 AM. Be sure to come to the auditorium to hear this acclaimed local children’s musician and author present his signature mix of catchy lyrics and bouncy beats. Families with babies, toddlers, and preschoolers will especially enjoy this performance. After the show, be sure to take home some of these fabulous children’s music CD’s. Rock on!

You Just Need a Good Book!

Recently Christin Rude from the University of Washington Bookstore came to the Everett Public Library and presented some reading recommendations to the Everett Woman’s Book Club. I have been attacking this list with fervor and have found the books to be not just good, but excellent.

index (19)The first book I picked up was non-fiction. I think we all know what we would learn if we read the book The Shallows: What the internet is Doing to Our Brains. We would find what author Nicholas Carr presents: that books and reading help to focus our minds and promote deep thoughts while the internet, with its rapid, distracted sampling of small bits and pieces, is making us good at scanning and skimming. What we are losing is our capacity for concentration, contemplation, and reflection. We don’t have time to read and even if we did, we’d be too distracted to concentrate.

That is exactly what we’d learn if we had time to read The Shallows. I know I don’t.  I’m too busy with Instagram, Pinterest, Facebook, and my other online obsessions. Until I find a good book. And, you guys, I have! I have found two from Rude’s list that I’ve read more quickly than any in recent memory because they grabbed me and I was consumed with their worlds. In the interest of fighting Internet distraction, I’d like to share them with you.

index (20)Crooked Letter, Crooked Letter by Tom Franklin is fabulous. This literary murder mystery won the Gold Dagger Award in 2011 because of wonderfully drawn characters and a setting which sucks you into the world of rural Mississippi of the 1970’s. Silas was the son of a poor, single black mother, and Larry was the child of lower middle-class white parents. Despite the racial tensions of the era, they become friends until a girl goes missing after a date with Larry. She is never found and Larry lives with the suspicion of her murder for years, spending his days as a lonely mechanic and becoming known as ‘Scary Larry’ to the folks in the town. He’s a compelling character as he visits his mother daily and keeps her chickens (named after the first ladies) and home up, all the while just hoping for a friend. His boyhood friend Silas returns after many years to become the town ‘constable’ who must investigate a new murder. It turns out that Silas does know something of the long ago murder and what he has left unsaid impacts his life and that of many others. Read this book if you want an engrossing novel which you will contemplate and reflect upon for many days.

index (1)The second book I read from Rude’s list has been a runaway number one best-seller in France and is the first work translated into English by author Gregoire Delacourt. My Wish List  is the story of Jocelyne, a wife and mother living in a small French town. She runs a haberdashery and writes a successful crafting blog. Her best friends work at the hairdressers next door and dream of winning big on the Euromillions. Convinced that Jocelyne will get a taste for their lottery habit, they encourage her to buy a ticket and, amazingly, Jocelyne wins 18 million euros. Before cashing her winnings, Jocelyne begins to list her ‘desires’ which are mostly simple, everyday objects.  She ponders whether money can truly bring happiness. Should she cash the check? Or will having such a large sum of money cause more problems than it solves?

My Wish List made me contemplate just how much influence money has over our lives, not just the opportunities it can afford but also affecting how you are perceived by others and whether it is healthy to be able to afford everything you wish for. From the opening sentence to the closing message, it was a literary, yet very accessible book. Touching and heart-wrenching, My Wish List lives up to the hype surrounding it. It is a well crafted and all-consuming novel.

I am looking forward to reading more books on Rude’s list and perhaps sharing them with you. But right now, I gotta go check my Facebook page. Squirrel!

Top Ten Books That Have Stayed With Us

If you’re on Facebook and have friends who read, you may have come across the recent meme which asks you to list the top ten books that have influenced and stayed with you in some way. You’re not supposed to think hard about this or take too long to do it. Just list ten!

I thought that it would be interesting to conduct a (very unscientific) poll of the library staff to see which books have stayed with us as a whole. The results included a lot of children’s books and that might be because we tend to read these books at a very impressionable age. Favorite books from these years are more likely to lodge themselves deeply into our memories. It’s probable that the book that made you love reading was a children’s book because that’s when you first had an all-night, under-the-covers, flashlight-lit reading binge.

So what did I do with my responses? I tallied them up, of course, and rated them by their popularity. That, unfortunately, left many favorites by the wayside. I have included a quote from each book that got at least two votes. Here they are in all of their glory:

index (1)The Little House on the Prairie series by Laura Ingalls Wilder was the clear winner with a total of four votes. “The real things haven’t changed. It is still best to be honest and truthful; to make the most of what we have; to be happy with simple pleasures; and have courage when things go wrong.”  I read the whole series over and over again and it was pure pleasure to read about a young girl who was happy to have an orange at Christmas.

index (3)Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maude Montegomery was a close second with three votes. Anne, an eleven-year-old orphan, is sent to live with a lonely, middle-aged brother and sister on a Prince Edward Island farm and proceeds to make an indelible impression on everyone around her. This series would make an excellent family read-aloud. Anne: “Isn’t it nice to think that tomorrow is a new day with no mistakes in it yet?”

index (4)The Hobbit, or, There and Back Again by J.R.R. Tolkien was right up there with Anne and that’s no surprise. This book is a glorious account of a magnificent adventure, filled with suspense and seasoned with a quiet humor that is irresistible. “In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit” until the day the wandering wizard Gandalf chooses him to take part in an adventure from which he may never return.

index (5)Rounding out the three vote category is (gasp!) an adult book: All Creatures Great and Small by James Herriot. This is a humorous memoir of a Scottish vet who roamed the remote Yorkshire Dales treating every patient that came his way, from smallest to largest, and observing animals and humans alike with his keen eye. “If having a soul means being able to feel love and loyalty and gratitude, then animals are better off than a lot of humans.” This is superb comfort reading.

There were many, many books with one vote, but these are the ones which got two votes (in alphabetical order):

index (6)Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy isn’t one that I read as a child, but it was one I read in college and the one that taught me to love great literary works. It has been described as the best novel ever written and is considered flawless by many. Anna Karenina tells the story of the doomed love affair between the sensuous, rebellious Anna and the dashing officer, Count Vronsky. “All happy families are alike; each unhappy family is unhappy in its own way.”

index (7)Charlotte’s Web by E. B. White, the author of Stuart Little, is a classic of children’s literature that is just about perfect.  “Some Pig. Humble. Radiant.” These are the words in Charlotte’s web, high up in Zuckerman’s barn. Charlotte’s spiderweb tells of her feelings for a little pig named Wilbur, who simply wants a friend. They also express the love of a girl named Fern, who saved Wilbur’s life when he was born the runt of his litter. E. B. White’s Newbery Honor Book is a tender novel of friendship, love, life, and death that will continue to be enjoyed by generations to come.

index (8)The Harry Potter series was THE most popular on Facebook, but just one of our books with two votes. We must be older. This is the book that ushered in an entire generation of readers, my children included. You know the plot: Harry is an orphan who lives a rather dismal life until he gets a message from an owl which summons him to a life of magic and quidditch at Hogwart’s School. “The truth is a beautiful and terrible thing, and should therefore be treated with caution.”

index (10)The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy by Douglas Adams was perhaps the first Sci-Fi book you read. Seconds before the Earth is demolished for a galactic freeway, Arthur Dent is saved by Ford Prefect, a researcher for the revised Guide. Together they stick out their thumbs, travel to the stars and begin a wild journey through time and space. You either love this or put it down like a hot potato. “So long, and thanks for all the fish.”

index (11)I read all of the Nancy Drew Series the summer before fourth grade and oh, how I loved Nancy and Ned! This series had an enormous impact on the popular imagination because it features a female main character who is smart and brave and rescues her boyfriend instead of the other way around. These books were so much better than the Hardy boys. “Nancy, every place you go, it seems as if mysteries just pile up one after another.”

indexPaddle-To-The-Sea  is a 1942 Caldecott Honor Book written and illustrated by Holling Clancy Holling. At Lake Nipigon Canada, a native boy carves a wooden model of an Indian in a canoe and sets it free to travel the Great Lakes to the Atlantic ocean. The story follows the progress of the little wooden Indian on its journey through all five Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence River, finally arriving at the Atlantic Ocean. “Put me back into the water for I am Paddle-to-the Sea.” 

So, there you have it. Perhaps you can get some of these books into the hands of an impressionable reader, or would even like to re-read them yourself. I can’t leave you without giving you my own personal list. I love each and every one of these!

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Farewell to the Bookmobile

 

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Everett has had a long history of taking the library out into the community. Bookmobile service began in May 1924 when the prohibitive expense of operating branch outlets in the community caused the library to invest in a Ford Model T truck modified to serve as a “book wagon”, a traveling mini-library. Named Pegasus after the flying horse of mythology, it was the first bookmobile in Washington State.

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By the time this photo was taken in 1945, Pegasus was showing her age. After many years of service Pegasus was retired in 1950.

kidsbookmobileThe current bookmobile was purchased in 2004 and has served Everett preschools ever since. I have been the bookmobile librarian for the last two school years and would see about 700 children each month at area ECEAPS, Headstarts, daycares and private preschools. The typical visit would include a full storytime followed by a visit to the bookmobile where each child had the library experience of selecting and checking out a book which they would read and care for that month. These were children who often did not have the opportunity to visit the library on their own because of busy work and family schedules. These current photos were taken at a children’s concert at Silver Lake last summer.

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Sadly, this long history of Bookmobile Service in Everett is coming to an end this month. Due to the City reducing the library’s budget by $200,000, the Library Board had to make the very difficult decision of cutting Outreach Services.

-af770c83da9e5b82I am inspired by this librarian who was an Outreach Librarian in New York City. When her job was cut because of the budget, she moved to New Orleans and started up a bicycle mobile service to the children of the Lower 9th Ward.  She received the first ever Lemony Snicket Award for her service and she gets some good exercise also.

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We do have some bookmobile themed books in the library which may be of interest to you. The children’s book Wild About Books by Judy Sierra is a fun read about librarian Molly McGrew who drives the bookmobile to the zoo where the enthusiastic animals literally and figuratively devour the books. This is a great rhyming story which is perfect for reading aloud over and over again.

index (1)The Camel Bookmobile by Masha Hamilton is a novel about Brooklyn librarian Fiona Sweeney who wants to do something that matters, and she chooses to make her mark in the arid bush of northeastern Kenya. By helping to start a traveling library she hopes to bring literature to far-flung tiny communities where people live daily with drought, hunger and disease. Her intentions are honorable, and her rules are firm: Due to the limited number of donated books, if any one of them is not returned the bookmobile will not return. But, encumbered by her Western values, Fi does not understand the people she seeks to help. And in the impoverished small community of Mididima, she finds herself caught in the middle of a volatile local struggle when the bookmobile’s presence sparks a dangerous feud between the proponents of modernization and those who fear the loss of traditional ways.

I will now be working full-time inside the library at both the Evergreen Branch Library and the Main Library. Come see me in the library!

Explore Washington!

The weather forecast is for a string of beautiful days here in the Pacific Northwest so that means it’s time to get outside and explore our fair state. But, where to go and what to do? Start at the library with one of these guidebooks!

indexCheck out the DK Eyewitness Travel Guide to the Pacific Northwest for a good over-view of the area and fantastic pictures and maps that will lead you straight to the best attractions the northwest coast of the USA has to offer. This book will take you street by street  through Pike Place Market, give you details like the hours and a map of the Woodland Park Zoo, help you find a place to stay and most importantly, point you to a good place to eat. It’s also a handy travel size so you can take it along with you.

index (2)If you’re interested in a road trip, I’d recommend The Pacific Northwest’s Best Trips: 33 Amazing Road Trips. This Lonely Planet guide (love them!) features 33 amazing road trips, from 2-day escapes to 2-week adventures and points out good places to eat and sleep. It includes tips on seeing each area like a local, using maps, directions and expert advice. It can help you plan trips focusing on history, food & drink, family trips, or the mountains. I’m dreaming about the three-day wine tour myself.

index (4)Jack McLeod who wrote the North Cascades Highway: A Roadside Guide to America’s Alps will give a free author talk at the main library on Sunday, September 28th at 2 PM. This is an illustrated natural history guide which helps travelers and readers to appreciate the deeper beauty behind the landscape. Organized as a series of stops at eye-catching sites along eighty miles of the highway, this book reveals the geological story of each location. Reserve a copy before the rush!

index (1)When I was a child, our family goal was to try all of the Mexican Restaurants in San Diego. My husband wants to visit all of the major league baseball stadiums if he ever retires. Perhaps you’d like a goal also. Why don’t you search for all of the spectacular waterfalls in Washington State? The Waterfall Lover’s Guide to the Pacific Northwest is your ticket to that adventure. Go see five-star falls such as Snoqualmie or Wallace Falls or discover smaller, closer falls which may be hidden but not after you read this book. Check it out!

index (2)My husband just completed the RAMROD (ride around Mt. Rainier in one Day). It was 175 miles of constant up and down. If you want to see the area from the seat of your bicycle, check out Biking Puget Sound. You’ll find local trails in Everett (our favorite is out to Snohomish along the river because you’re in the country within ten minutes of leaving home) or rides up in the San Juan Islands (steer clear of Mt. Constitution!), or longer rides across the state. Next thing you know, you’ll be signing up for the RAMROD!

index (3)If hiking is more to your liking, we’ve always used the Mountaineer’s Guides. The Day Hiking books will get you out and up to a beautiful alpine lake and then back home in time for dinner. These are the updated Mountaineer books that we all used to break in our hiking boots. Even young children can do a lot of the hikes such as Heather, Elizabeth, or Barclay Lakes. These guides will tell you if hikes are dog-friendly, kid-friendly, easy, historical, or full of wildflowers. Of course, you’ll learn how to drive to the trails and what to look for while on the trails so you don’t get lost.

index (5)There are a number of walks closer to home included in the Take a Walk books by Sue Muller Hacking. The first walk listed is 2-4 miles on Jetty Island just west of Everett. Then there’s Langus Riverfront Park, Spencer Island, Centennial Trail, Howarth Park, Forest Park, and the Lowell Riverfront Trail. This is the book for when you just have half a day and want to explore the local area more deeply. It lists the park amenities and driving directions. Perfect.

index (7)Paddling Washington: Flatwater and Whitewater routes in Washington State and the Inland Northwest is your ticket to a memorable time out on the water. Detailed locator maps and instructions on safety are included, as well as appendices on equipment, map sources and a useful route comparison chart for selecting the right trip level for any paddler. The 112 water routes cover western and eastern Washington, British Columbia, North Idaho and Montana. If you don’t have a boat yourself, you can easily rent one at the University of Washington. Be one of the boys in the boat!

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Get_Asset_Img (1)For other summer activities pick up a free copy of the Everett Parks and Recreation Summer Guide while you’re at the library. We have stacks of them and It lists day camps, aquatics, health and fitness classes, and guided outdoor activities. There’s a fall edition coming out soon.

When we’re not at the library, I hope to see you out on the roads or water or trails. Enjoy!

Must Reads for Summer 2014

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There are good and bad things about working in a library. The good: all of the great books that you discover and get to read. The bad: all of the great books that you don’t have time to read. We all have excuses and these are mine: full-time work and a toddler who just turned two years old and a baby who is ten months old. Oh yeah, and a house and garden and that guy I married 33 years ago. So, I often feel like that funny old bird the pelican whose beak holds more than his belly can. I have a beak full of great reads these days which may interest you if you’re participating in the summer reading program at the Everett Public Library or if you’re lucky enough to be planning a vacation and need a good book to take along. This list has a little bit of everything so there may be just the right book for you. Let’s start with non-fiction.

indexCA1ADCTLFlash Boys: a Wall Street Revolt by Michael Lewis is on my list since I read Boomerang and I thought that it was the bomb. This guy also wrote Moneyball and The Blind Side and other excellent books. It reads like a John Grisham novel, but it’s a true story about stock exchanges, high frequency traders, and dark pools. The author is great at explaining complicated technical subjects and telling a good story around them. I want to read it!

indexCA63IMS4Leonardo and the Last Supper has been by my bedside for a few weeks now. It’s excellent! I was an art history major in college and I’ve learned so much more from this book about the creation of this Renaissance masterpiece. Mr. King has managed to focus on a particular theme and give the reader as much information as needed to really understand it. Another of his earlier books accomplished the same thing, Brunelleschi’s Dome, which I can also recommend.

indexCAAEEVC8The President and the Assassin: McKinley, terror, and Empire at the Dawn of the American Century is a great book (obvious from the first chapter) by Seattle author, Scott Miller. He creates a portrait of turn of the century America going back and forth between an under-appreciated president, William McKinley and his anarchist assassin, Leon Czolgosz. This was a time when the powerful were growing more powerful and desperate men turned to terrorism. Sound familiar?

And now for some fiction:

index (16)I have to read Americanah by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie because my daughter heard her give a talk recently in Copenhagen and apparently it’s wonderful. The author takes on immigration, race, and what it means to leave home and to return, all wrapped up in a love story. Adichie has also written Half of a Yellow Sun and Purple Hibiscus. The first chapter alone is marvelous. Let’s all get with it and read this one.

indexCAZNZBA7The Care of Wooden Floors by Will WIles was recommended to me by two co-workers so I checked it out and my husband read it while we were on vacation. Even though I couldn’t read it, he confirmed that it is funny and interesting and a good book.  It’s an odd couple story of a fellow who house sits for a composer friend. He accidentally spills wine on the apartment’s priceless wooden floor and endures a disastrous week of perfectionist repair and maintenance.

index (1)Delicious! is by Ruth Reichl. I’ve read all of her memoirs from Garlic and Sapphires to Tender at the Bone. This is her first attempt at fiction and she certainly writes about what she knows: the heroine is a woman who works for a venerable food magazine that suddenly ceases publication. It looks like a pretty fun and fast read, and if you’re looking for a souffle-type novel, you could do worse! Plus, the cover is lovely.

indexBroken Harbor is Tana French’s new ‘Dublin Murder Squad’ crime novel and it’s supposed to be every bit as brilliant as her three earlier books featuring that tough cop, Mick “Scorcher” Kennedy. This is a murder story which seems easy to solve at first until the details don’t add up. Read this one to get the atmosphere of an Ireland hit hard by the recession, an idea of police procedure and to become engrossed in a well written who dunnit.

index (1)The Possibilities is written by Kaui Hart Hemmings who also wrote The Descendants. You’ll remember that movie with George Clooney. This new book follows a similar theme of family and loss and is set in the paradise of Breckenridge, Colorado. A single mom is grieving the loss of her son, Cully, in an avalanche when a strange girl shows up with a secret from Cully’s past.

indexThe Vacationers by Emma Straub  will take you all the way to the beaches of Spain, where a family’s dramas are set against the beautiful background of a lush vacation. It will leave you feeling like you were just on a family trip — laughing, exhausted and filled with love.

So, check out one of these books to take on your next vacation or simply read one for a great ‘staycation’. Either way, enjoy!

Books That Started as Blogs

If you’re like me, and I hope you are, you follow a blog or two just because it’s fun. Of course I read this very blog because my smart and hip co-workers contribute valuable stuff to it. Hey, you’re reading it right now! You must be just like me.

Did you know that there are a lot of great books which have been spawned from blogs? Let’s explore some recent titles which had their starts as blogs. I’ll start with the visual ones:

indexCake Wrecks: When Professional Cakes Go Hilariously Wrong by Jen Yates is so funny! Yates has been entertaining us with the worst cakes ever, including the ugly, silly, creepy, sad, and suggestive on her blog since 2008. It currently features photos of awful graduation cakes. Have your cake and laugh at it, too. With witty commentary and behind-the-scenes tidbits, Cake Wrecks will ensure that you never look at a cake the same way again.

index (1)There, I Fixed It! No, You Didn’t by Cheez Burger is part of the ubiquitous Cheezburger Network of blogs and is another hilarious visual feast full of epic fails which show human ingenuity at its worst. My favorite ‘chapter’ features quick fixes with duct tape.

index (14)How To Tell if Your Cat is Plotting to Kill You is based on the blog, The Oatmeal, a hugely popular website. It is a brilliant 136 page offering of cat comics, facts, and instructions to help you enjoy, love, and survive your cat. The book is a #1 NY Times best seller and sold over a half million copies in its first three months in print. Check it out from the library for free. Even I laughed, and I hate cats.

index (3)I do love dogs and fortunately for me there’s Dog Shaming by Pascale Lemire, based on the blog with the same name. This book features the most hilarious, shameful, and never-before-seen doggie misdeeds. It reminds me of the evening we were sitting around with friends having a nice conversation, when we discovered that our friend’s dog had chewed apart another friend’s shoe. We didn’t think to take a photo, but these folks have taken some pretty funny ones.

index (13)And what blog-book list would be complete without an awkward family photo selection? I’ll include Awkward Family Pet Photos which came from the Awkward Family Photos blog. These books are always so weird, yet funny. Just look at this fellow hugging his dog on the cover. The photos with monkeys, possums, and chickens are especially hilarious. And now on to the blog-books which have more text than photos.

index (4)Let’s Pretend This Never Happened:  (A Mostly True Memoir) is written by Jenny Lawson, the “Bloggess”. She’s ‘like Mother Theresa, only better.’ She writes this about her book: “You should probably go buy it right now, because it’s filled with awesomeness. And cocaine. But only if you hollow it out and fill it with your own cocaine. I’m not buying you cocaine. Because I love you.” I thought it was hilarious when I read it and you may also, since you’re just like me!

index (5)Quiet, Please: Dispatches from a Public Librarian by Scott Douglas who writes dispatches on McSweeney’s. Scott Douglas works for a smallish public library nestled cozily between Disneyland and Knott’s Berry Farm in Orange County, California. This is where most of his observations occur, although sometimes he goes to other libraries. This book is super funny because it could have taken place at our very own local library. Read it and see for yourself.

index (6)The Happiest Mom by Meagan Francis who writes the Happiest Home blog online. The author also writes for Parenting magazine and is the mother of five children, so she presumably knows her stuff and spells it out in ten simple rules that are delivered with humor. This book has gorgeous graphics and the main idea is that you can be a mom (or grandparent) and still be happy. As I’ve always said, if Momma ain’t happy, ain’t nobody happy!

These blog-books are sure to make you happy.  Check them out at your local library!