Spot-Lit for September 2014

Spot-Lit

Click the titles below and then the Full Display button to read summaries or reviews or to place titles on hold.

General Fiction / Literary Fiction  

Fiction

The Bone Clocks  by David Mitchell
Paying Guests  by Sarah Waters
The Betrayers  by David Bezmozgis
Florence Gordon  by Brian Morton
The Dog  by Joseph O’Neill

First Novels / Fiction

Debut

How to Build a Girl  by Caitlin Moran
Fives and Twenty-Fives  by Michael Pitre
Gutenberg’s Apprentice  by Alix Christie
Rooms  by Lauren Oliver
A Girl Is a Half-Formed Thing  by Eimear McBride

Many more promising debuts are coming out this month – take a look.

Crime Fiction /Suspense

Crime

The Secret Place  by Tana French
Last of the Independents  by Sam Wiebe
Perfidia  by James Ellroy
The Monogram Murders  by Sophie Hannah
Gangsterland  by Tod Goldberg

SF / Fantasy

SF

The Hawley Book of the Dead  by Chrysler Szarlan
The Mirror Empire  by Kameron Hurley
The Broken Eye  by Brent Weeks
The Falcon Throne  by Karen Miller
Maplecroft  by Cheri Priest

Romance / Erotica

Romance

Stay with Me  by J. Lynn
Claudine  by Barbara Palmer
Screwdrivered  by Alice Clayton
Linger  by Lauren Jameson
Virtue Falls  by Christina Dodd

To see all on-order fiction, click here.

Spot-Lit for August 2014

Spot-Lit

Here’s our fiction selector’s curated list of noteworthy August releases. Click the titles below and then the Full Display button to read summaries or reviews or to place titles on hold.

General Fiction / Literary Fiction   

General Fiction

Colorless Tsukuru Tazaki and His Years of Pilgrimage  by Haruki Murakami
The Fortune Hunter  by Daisy Goodwin
Lucky Us  by Amy Bloom
The Kills  by Richard House
The Madmen of Benghazi  by Gerard de Villers

First Novels

Debut

Your Face in Mine  by Jess Row
Painted Horses  by Malcolm Brooks
The Frozen Dead  by Bernard Minier
The Good Girl  by Mary Kubica
Panic in a Suitcase  by Yelena Akhtiorskaya

Crime Fiction /Suspense

Crime

A Colder War  by Charles Cumming
The Long Way Home  by Louise Penny
Strange Shores  by Arnaldur Indridasson
One Kick  by Chelsea Cain
The Furies  by Natalie Haynes

SF / Fantasy / Horror

SF-2

Fool’s Assassin  by Robin Hobb
Trial by Fire  by Charles Gannon
Lock In  by John Scalzi
We Are All Completely Fine  by Daryl Gregory
The Ghost in the Electric Blue Suit  by Graham Joyce

Romance

Romance

Heroes Are My Weakness  by Susan Elizabeth Phillips
With Every Breath  by Elizabeth Camden
Virgin  by Radhika Sanghani
Since You’ve Been Gone  by Anouska Knight
His Every Need  by Terri L. Austin

More good reading

If you’re curious about titles that will be coming out later this year, take a look through The MillionsMost Anticipated Books for the Second Half of 2014. Or to see what you may have missed, revisit their preview picks for the First Half of the year. Amazon looks in the rear-view mirror in their recently posted Best of 2014 so far, where Spot-Lit followers will recognize many of our own earlier picks. And if you’re looking to discover additional new talent, check out Library Journal’s Summer Best Debuts.

To see all on-order fiction, click here.

Word on the Street

024Ah the typewriter. Those of a certain age may remember when these machines were not collectibles or antiques but vital tools for the writer and office worker alike.  It’s probably been a while since you’ve seen a person hunched over a manual wordsmitherary, trying to produce a coherent sentence without the aid of spell check, but if you’ve been strolling down the streets of downtown Everett recently you may have stumbled upon this very scene.

These modern-day hunt-and-peck aficionados are participating in the city of Everett’s latest outdoor interactive art project titled Word on The Street. Ten vintage typewriters seated atop artist-embellished typewriter tables have been placed on sidewalks throughout downtown Everett. But these creations are not simply museum displays, no no no! People are encouraged to type away and leave their musings for others to discover. And to get the creative juices flowing there is a Question of the Day, provided by Everett Public Library staff no less. If you want to see all of these machines from yesteryear, a list of all their locations is available, including one found in the library of course. Don’t take too long though; the typewriters will only be on the street through August 5th.

typewriterartAs you ponder what to type, you may be interested to learn that the typewriter has actually been at the heart of an artistic movement for many years. If you would like to take a gander at all the art that was inspired and produced on this humble instrument, definitely check out Typewriter Art: A Modern Anthology by Barrie Tullett. In the pages of this handsome book you will find a surprisingly wide and varied array of works as well as interviews with those who use the medium.

So what are waiting for? Get out there and type.

Adult Summer Reading Reviews

We are nearing the mid-way point for the Literary Elements Adult Summer Reading Challenge. Many of you have signed up and received lots of great prizes. Some of you have gone out of your way to share reviews of books that you have been reading this summer. It was hard to choose, but a few selected reviews are shown below from the ones we have received so far. Thanks to all for participating and sharing your reviews with us!

An Inquiry into Love and Death by Simone St. James (Reviewed by Patricia R.)

inquiryintoloveanddeathAs a dedicated reader of fiction– Mysteries and Sci-Fi Fantasy–for over 65 years, this book surpassed anything I have ever heard of or read. From the first page to the last, it is a slow builder of suspense! And yes,fear! This is my first encounter with Gothic, though it is not the gory horror stories that make one ill. Ms. St. James has welded together Gothic, Mystery, and Romance with such great skill that the reader should not be surprised if she experiences goose bumps in the final chapters. Location is England in the early 1900’s, shortly after WW1, in a remote village. Ms. St. James writings are filled with spine-tingling, terrifying characters, but, there is also the beautiful romance with a Scotland Yard Inspector and the discovery of Jillian’s family history. I would share with you that this story is so compelling and intense that I would not choose to read this at night before bed. In some ways, a wonderful, old-fashioned ghost story! Her three books have been reviewed and listed on the NY Times Best Seller List with the 4th one to be released in April, 2015.

The Way of All Fish by Martha Grimes (Reviewed by Cathleen V.)

wayofallfishContract killers who take jobs on the condition that they can decide for themselves whether or not the target is worthy of elimination is an intriguing idea. Even though the inside flap of this novel gives the impression that the hit men are the focus of the tale, there are a large number of other characters who are part of the detailed schemes in this book. Some of the characters have talents, skills, hobbies, and occupations that could make them worthy of novels of their own. The twists, devious manipulations, and humor kept me reading through the points in the story which seemed slow or less relevant to the plot, even a few places where I was not certain I wished to continue on reading. I would say this is all right as one of my first reads of the summer. It requires some attention to keep track of several characters and storylines but is not so challenging that it is frustrating.

Animal Spirits: How Human Psychology Drives the Economy, and Why it Matters for Global Capitalism by George Akerlof and Robert Shiller (Reviewed by Cynthia W.)

animalspiritsI like to be reading a novel and a non-fiction book at all times. I have lots of opportunities to share good novels with friends and co-workers but I really value this forum to share an occasional non-fiction book. I just finished reading Animal Spirits, a look at classical economic theory and Keynesian theory in light of our questions regarding the recent behavior of our world economy. I have no training in economics so I was a bit nervous but also encouraged by the funny artwork on the cover and the mention of human psychology in the subtitle. The authors, George Akerlof and Robert Schiller, are economists whose names I have seen and heard in the news. While their collaborative style of writing is not graceful or very engaging, it is also not academic or difficult to understand for readers with a good all-round education in other fields. In fact, there is humor to be found in these pages. Beginning with a brief over-view of the work of Adam Smith and his most influential successor John Maynard Keynes, the authors point out the strengths and weaknesses of both theories as they have historically been applied to policy decisions. The “animal spirits” element of Keynes’ analysis, largely ignored by economists since his time, are explained as elements of non-rational human psychology that influence financial and economic decision-making. Since most decisions are made by people who are not following a theoretical ideology but are attempting to make the right decisions for themselves and their society, human psychology plays a greater role than previously acknowledged by theoreticians and scholars. The human considerations examined here are confidence, fairness, corruption and bad faith, money illusion (a new concept for me) and the human propensity to create a narrative story around our lives and circumstances. The effects that these considerations have on individual decisions, relationships and political discussion are easy to see in the world right now. In part 2 the book attempts to answer questions that depend on the economic concepts and human psychology presented in part 1. Questions like “Why do economies fall into depressions?” (lots of history in this one regarding both the US depression of the 1890’s and the Great Depression of the 1930’s that effected the whole world,) “Why are there people who cannot find a job?” (surprisingly, classical theory and the stripped-down version of Keynesian theory do not recognize the existence of involuntary unemployment,) “Why is saving for the future so arbitrary?” (including individual and cultural influences on decisions to save or spend,) and “Why do real estate markets go through cycles?” Animal Spirits is only 177 pages long but I would not call it an easy read. Neither is it too difficult. The insight into the current economic environment gained from this treatise ( the authors do espouse the view that government has a legitimate and vital role to play in economic health and stability) is well worth the effort. I feel more prepared to engage in discussion with the tools to express my own viewpoint and values and without rancor or accusation.

Spot-Lit for July 2014

Spot-Lit

Here’s our list of fiction to look for in July. Click the titles below and then the Full Display button to read summaries or reviews or to place titles on hold.

General Fiction / Literary Fiction  

Last Stories    Toledo    One Plus One    Tigerman    Care and Management of Lies

Last Stories and Other Stories  by William T. Vollman
How To Tell Toledo from the Night Sky  by Lydia Netzer
One Plus One  by Jojo Moyes
Tigerman  by Nick Harkaway
The Care and Management of Lies  by Jacqueline Winspear

Archival Revivals / New Translations

Echo's Bones    Conversations    Mr Gwyn    Professor    Agostino

Echo’s Bones  by Samuel Beckett
The Conversations  by César Aira
Mr. Gwyn  by Alessandro Baricco
The Professor and the Siren  by Giuseppe Tomasi di Lampedusa
Agostino  by Alberto Moravia

First Novels

Last Night    Sleepwalker's    Dry Bones in the Valley    Man Called Ove    Girls from Corona Del Mar

Last Night at the Blue Angel  by Rebecca Rotert
The Sleepwalker’s Guide to Dancing  by Mira Jacob
Dry Bones in the Valley  by Tom Bouman
A Man Called Ove  by Frederik Backman
The Girls from Corona del Mar  by Rufi Thorpe

Crime Fiction /Suspense

Peter Pan Must Die    Everyone Lies    That Night    Dead Will Tell    Night Searchers

Peter Pan Must Die  by John Verdon
Everyone Lies  by A.D. Garrett
That Night  by Chevy Stevens
The Dead Will Tell  by Linda Castillo
The Night Searchers  by Marcia Muller

SF / Fantasy / Horror

Queen of the Tearling    Half a King    Full Fathom Five    All Those Vanished Engines    House of Small Shadows

The Queen of the Tearling  by Erika Johansen
Half a King  by Joe Abercrombie
Full Fathom Five  by Max Gladstone
All Those Vanished Engines  by Paul Park
The House of Small Shadows  by Adam Nevill

To see all on-order fiction, click here.

Spot-Lit for June 2014

Spot-Lit

These June novels are getting a lot of praise in advance reviews. Click the titles below and then the Full Display button to read summaries or reviews or to place titles on hold.

General Fiction / Literary Fiction  

summer house    Arsonist    Vacationers    Bellweather Rhapsody    Hundred-Year House

Summer House with Swimming Pool  by Herman Koch
The Arsonist  by Sue Miller
The Vacationers  by Emma Straub
Bellweather Rhapsody  by Kate Racculia
The Hundred-Year House  by Rebecca Makkai

First Novels

Antiquarian    Everything    Quick    Fourth of July    People in the Photo

The Antiquarian  by Gustavo Faveron Patriau
Everything I Never Told You  by Celeste Ng
The Quick  by Lauren Owen
Fourth of July Creek  by Smith Henderson
The People in the Photo  by Helene Gestern

Crime Fiction /Suspense

Good Suicides    Better World    Coldsleep Lullaby    Silkworm    Truth About

The Good Suicides  by Antonio Hill
A Better World  by Marcus Sakey
Coldsleep Lullaby  by Andrew Brown
The Silkworm  by Robert Galbraith (J.K. Rowling)
The Truth About the Harry Quebert Affair  by Joel Dicker

SF & Fantasy

Memory of Water    Hard to Be a God    Koko    Madonna    Cibola Burn

Memory of Water  by Emmi Itäranta
Hard to Be a God  by Arkady and Boris Strugatsky
Koko Takes a Holiday  by Kieran Shea
The Madonna and the Starship  by James Morrow
Cibola Burn  by James S.A. Corey

To see all on-order fiction, click here.

For other notable new fiction lists, try the Indie Next List and Library Reads

For Your Listening Pleasure

Selecting a good audiobook, whether on CD or in digital format, can be a two-step process. There is the first and most obvious step of selecting for the content of the book:  Is it an author you like? Can they write well? Is the subject interesting? If you have listened to audiobooks for a while, you realize there is an important second step: Is the narrator any good? A narrator that you find annoying can really kill the experience no matter how good the content. On the flip side, an excellent narrator can make a book you might not consider at first a fascinating listen. The problem is, how do you find these great narrators.

audies

One way is to check out an award given by the Audio Publishers Association named the Audies. The Audies are given to titles recorded in a given year based in large part on the excellence of the reader or readers. Even better, they are divided into categories (Biography, Fiction, Mystery, Humor etc.) so you can select in the genre you are interested in. This year, the winners will be announced on Thursday May 29th in New York. Until then you can browse this list of all the nominees, complete with audio samples. You may also be interested in viewing the winners from past years for further listen opportunities. To help you get through the rather long list for this year’s ceremony, here is a selection of the nominated audiobooks by category with links to our catalog. Enjoy!

still foolin emI am Malalaeverything storegreat gatsbydoctor sleep

Audiobook of the Year
Still Foolin’Em by Billy Crystal, Read by Billy Crystal
The Testament of Mary by Colm Toibin, Read by Meryl Streep

Biography/Memoir
I Am Malala by Malala Yousafzai, Read by Archie Panjabi
My Beloved World by Sonia Sotomayor, Read by Rita Moreno

Business/Educational
The Everything Store by Brad Stone, Read by Pete Larkin
Naked Statistics by Charles Wheelan, Read by Jonathan Davis

Classic
The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald, Read by Jake Gyllenhaal
Love in the Time of Cholera by Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Read by Armando Duran

Fantasy
Wisp of a Thing by Alex Bledsoe, Read by Stefan Rudnicki

Fiction
Doctor Sleep by Stephen King, Read by Will Patton
The Good House by Ann Leary, Read by Mary Beth Hurt
The Ocean at the End of the Lane by Neil Gaiman, Read by Neil Gaiman

ocean at the end of the lanefrozen in timelets explore diabetesstory of godgoldfinch

History
Frozen in Time by Mitchell Zuckoff, read by Mitchell Zuckoff
The Hour of Peril by Danil Stashower, read by Edoardo Ballerini
One Summer by Bill Bryson, read by Bill Bryson

Humor
Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls by David Sedaris, Read by David Sedaris

Inspirational/Faith-Based Fiction
A Story of God and All of Us by Mark Burnett & Roma Downey, Read by authors and Keith David
Truth-Stained Lies by Terri Blackstock, Read by Gabrielle de Cuir

Inspirational/Faith-Based Non-Fiction
Break Out! By Joel Osteen, Read by Joel Osteen

Literary Fiction
The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt, Read by David Pittu
The Son by Philipp Meyer, Read by Will Patton, Scott Shepherd, Kate Mulgrew, Clifton Collins

enders game aliveworld war zhes gonebeyond beliefthe telling room

Multi-Voiced Performance
Ender’s Game Alive by Orson Scott Card, Read by full cast
World War Z by Max Brooks, Read by full cast

Mystery
Death and the Lit Chick by G.M. Malliet, Read by Davina Porter
He’s Gone by Deb Caletti, Read by Cassandra Campbell
Rage Against the Dying by Becky Masterman, Read by Judy Kaye

Non-Fiction
Beyond Belief by Jenna Miscavige Hill, Read by Sandy Rustin
David and Goliath by Malcolm Gladwell, Read by Malcolm Gladwell
The Telling Room by Michael Paterniti, Read by L.J. Ganser
Thank You for Your Service by Daivd Finkel, Read by Arthur Bishop

ever afterlongest ridethe martianthe hitsycamore row

Paranormal
Ever After by Kim Harrison, Read by Marguerite Gavin
Red Moon by Benjamin Percy, Read by Benjamin Percy

Romance
The Longest Ride by Nicholas Sparks, Read by January LaVoy, Ron Mclarty

Science Fiction
Maddaddam by Margaret Atwood, Read by Bernadette Dunne, Bob Walter, Robbie Daymond
The Martian by Andy Weir, Read by R.C. Bray

Thriller/Suspense
The Fifth Assassin by Brad Meltzer, Read by Scott Brick
The Hit by David Baldacci, Read by Ron McLarty, Orlagh Cassidy
Suspect by Robert Crais, Read by Macleod Andrews
Sycamore Row by John Grisham, Read by Michael Beck