Spot-Lit for October 2015


Click here to see all these titles in the library catalog, read reviews, or place holds. Or click a book cover to enlarge it or to view the covers as a slide show.

Spot-Lit for September 2015


Love-him-or-love-to-hate-him, the “Great American Novelist,” Jonathan Franzen is back with Purity, a novel of family secrets, complex characters and questionable intentions.

In other family-centered storytelling, Lauren Groff takes a hard, clear look at the surfaces and undercurrents of a decades-long marriage.

Fans of tell-all auto-fiction in the vein of Karl Ove Knausgaard’s My Struggle series will want to check out Elena Ferrante’s Neapolitan novels – The Story of the Lost Child, the series closer, is due out this week.

In dystopian novels, Margaret Atwood returns with a frightening story of economic collapse and totalitarianism, and Claire Watkins spins a dark tale about the changed social and physical landscape brought on by a near-future California drought.

Northwest authors Jonathan Evison and J.A. Jance have new books forthcoming. And a couple of first novels feature Northwest settings – Jimmy Bluefeather (Alaska) and Dryland (Portland).

Among other standout first novels there’s Did You Ever Have a Family by Bill Clegg (woman loses everyone and everything she loves in a house fire), and After the Parade by Lori Ostlund (setting out on one’s own after being paralyzed by loss and grief).

In the crime realm, look for the familiar-sounding The Girl in the Spider’s Web – a follow-up to the immensely popular Stieg Larsson books. And advance praise is raining down on The Killing Lessons, The Scribe and The Child Garden.

Fantasy fans will want to know that Jim Butcher’s starting a new series and might also want to take a look at Seth Dickinson’s Traitor Baru Cormorant. For readers of the supernatural, try Tananarive Due’s Ghost Summer.

Click the book cover montage below to see this list of titles in the library catalog, read reviews, or place holds.


Notable New Fiction 2015 (to date) | All On-Order Fiction.

Spot-Lit for August 2015


An embarrassment of riches is coming your way in August (and it’s a shame that many worthy contenders had to be left off this list).

See in particular The Journey by Sergio Pitol, considered by those in the know to be one of the greatest living Spanish language writers (this is the second book in his Trilogy of Memory which is being translated this year into English for the first time).

Adventurous readers might also want to check out the Complete Stories by the great Brazilian writer Clarice Lispector.

Best Boy, by Eli Gottlieb, delivers a moving look at autism in middle age.

Haruki Murakami fans get a pair of early works (long out of print), and new books are on the way by popular authors Alice Hoffman, Louise Penny and Ivan Doig (the novel he completed just before his death earlier this year).

Cozy fans can reconnect with Simon Brett’s Mrs. Pargeter after a sixteen-year absence, and readers of creepier crime fiction might consider Karin Fossum’s The Drowned Boy.

For a dark, cataclysmic fantasy take a look at N.K. Jemisin’s The Fifth Season.

Readers looking for new talent might want to try Drunken Botanist author Amy Stewart’s Girl Waits with Gun, Vu Tran’s thriller Dragonfish, or Lauren Holmes collection of stories about navigating the new adult world, Barbara the Slut.

Of course there’s more I haven’t mentioned – click on the book cover montage below to see all the titles in the list, read reviews or place holds.

montageNotable New Fiction 2015 (to date) | All On-Order Fiction.

Spot-Lit for July 2015


Many a popular author is back with a new book this July, including To Kill a Mockingbird author Harper Lee! You’ll also find a handful of excellent first novels, and a lively mix of mysteries, suspense, science fiction and fantasy.

Click the book cover montage below and then the Full Display button beside each title to read summaries or reviews or to place titles on hold.

Notable New Fiction in the Everett Public Library catalog

Notable New Fiction 2015 (to date) | All On-Order Fiction.

Spot-Lit for June 2015


These titles – from established, emerging, and under-the-radar authors – are some of the most anticipated new releases based on a consensus of advance reviews, publisher interest, and bookish social media.

Click the book cover montage below and then the Full Display button beside each title to read summaries or reviews or to place titles on hold.

Montage 2

Notable New Fiction 2015 (to date) | All On-Order Fiction.

It’s Time for Summer Reading

Just in case you missed the article in the Everett Herald on Sunday, here is a list, complete with links to our catalog, of titles our writers are looking forward to reading this summer. So many books, so little time.

From Carol:


Oh Joy! By Joy Cho
A fun DIY book of awesome summer projects by the author of the popular blog Oh Joy!

The Misadventures of Awkward Black Girl by Issa Rae
Part memoir, part guidebook for other Awkward Black Girls, laughter and insight in equal measures. I’m halfway through and find myself wishing I had a BFF like Issa!

Mapmaker by Mark Bomback & Galaxy Craze Teenagers
Tanya and Connor stumble on a deadly secret while working at the digital mapmaking company where Tanya’s dead father once worked. Mystery, adventure, and hopefully some romance!

The Sasquatch Hunter’s Almanac by Sharma Shields
A  dark, fantastical, multi-generational tale about a family whose patriarch is consumed by the hunt for the mythical, elusive Sasquatch he encountered in his youth. The author of this novel is speaking at a library conference this fall and I want to read it first!

fileunderFrom Ron:

File Under: 13 Suspicious Incidents by Lemony Snicket
The All the Wrong Questions series features a young Lemony Snicket being mentored in the art of detectiving by a mysterious woman, whilst attempting to unravel perplexing questions in the curious village of  Stain’d-by-the-Sea.

From Richard:

eatingromeEating Rome: Living the Good Life in the Eternal City by Elizabeth Minchilli
The eternal city has culture, monuments and beauty in spades but oh my, the food. If you don’t have the time or money to visit the ancient capital this summer, this book should offer the next best thing with a culinary tour from a local expert.

From Leslie:


At the Water’s Edge by Sara Gruen
Set during WWII, Maddie, her husband Ellis and his best friend Hank leave their pampered high society lives in Philadelphia after falling out of grace with family in search of the Loch Ness Monster.  This is a moving love story set in an unusual setting.

The Harder They Come by T.C. Boyle
T.C. Boyle’s The Harder They Come is on my list because I loved Tortilla Curtain. Inspired by a true story and set in contemporary Northern California, it explores the volatile connections between three damaged people as they careen toward an explosive confrontation.

The Wright Brothers by David McCullough
As he did so brilliantly in The Great Bridge and The Path Between the Seas, David McCullough once again tells a dramatic story of people and technology, this time about the courageous brothers who taught the world how to fly, Wilbur and Orville Wright.

Go Set a Watchman by Harper Lee would be a great summer read and is sure to be popular. Twenty years after the trial of Tom Robinson, Scout returns home to Maycomb to visit her father and struggles with personal and political issues in her small Alabama town.

From Lisa:


The Fair Fight: A Novel  by Anna Freeman
Born in a brothel in late eighteenth-century England, homely Ruth escapes an uncertain future in an unlikely place: the bareknuckle prize fighting rings of Bristol.

This Book is Gay (on-order) by James Dawson
Gay, straight, questioning, and everyone in-between and beyond. This book is an instruction manual and question and answer session for anyone interested in learning more about growing up LGBTQ. A funny, honest, and enlightening read for teens and adults alike.

The Subprimes by Karl Taro Greenfeld
In the apocalyptic future, Americans are segregated by their credit scores. Those with bad credit, dubbed Subprimes, inhabit an underground world of unemployment and fear. Follow a Subprime family as they journey east to seek out a better life.

Spectacle:The Astonishing Life of Ota Benga by Pamela Newkirk
After being displayed at the 1904 World’s Fair’s Human Zoo, a Congolese man (dubbed a ‘pygmy’) was moved into the Monkey House at the New York Zoological Society. This is his shockingly true story of racial prejudice.

My Journey Into Yoga

Enjoy a post today from Gloria:

I began my journey into yoga a few years ago. I was overweight and due to past injuries (broken leg, repeated ankle sprains, plantar fasciitis and osteoarthritis) I wanted to get some exercise that wouldn’t pound on my joints. I wasn’t sure of the commitment I wanted to give this new fitness, so I took a class with my local school district to see if it would be a success or failure. I discovered that yoga isn’t about success, failure or competition, it is all about the journey.

Listed below are some yoga resources that you might find helpful if you head down the same path as me.

The City of Everett Parks department offers many local yoga classes. The upcoming summer classes are listed in the Everett Parks & Recreation Summer Guide on page 16.

The library has a lot of great books and DVDs for the entire family that cover many subjects relating to yoga.


Healing Yoga: Proven Postures to Treat Twenty Common Ailments – From Backache to Bone Loss, Shoulder Pain to Bunions and More by Loren Fishman came up in my search as one of Everett Public Libraries most popular yoga books.

Everett has a naval base here in the city, and I thought the book Yoga for Warriors, Basic Training in Strength, Resilience and Peace of Mind: a System for Veterans and Military Service Men and Women by Beryl Bender Birch would be a book our local warriors might want to check out.

Blending Yoga and fiction is a fun and lighthearted way to integrate the practice with a fun story. EPL has the Downward Dog Mystery Series by Tracy Weber.

Here are two Yoga memoirs complete with descriptions from the catalog to give you an idea of what they are about:

Yoga Girl by Rachel Brathen
yogagirlPart self-help and part memoir, Yoga Girl is an inspirational, full-color look at the adventure that took writer and yoga teacher Rachel Brathen from her hometown in Sweden to the jungles of Costa Rica and finally to a paradise island in the Caribbean that she now calls home. In Yoga Girl, she gives readers an in-depth look at her journey from her self-destructive teenage years to the bohemian life she’s built through yoga and meditation in Aruba today. Featuring photos of Brathen practicing yoga in tropical locales, along with step-by-step yoga sequences and simple recipes.

yogaandbodyimageYoga and Body Image: 25 Personal Stories About Beauty, Bravery & Loving Your Body by Melanie Klein & Anna Guest-Jelley
In this remarkable, first-of-its-kind book twenty-five contributors–including musician Alanis Morissette, celebrity yoga instructor Seane Corn, and New York Times bestselling author Dr. Sara Gottfried–discuss how yoga and body image intersect. Through inspiring personal stories you’ll discover how yoga not only affects your physical health, but also how you feel about your body.

There are many great Yoga DVDs available from the library. Here are three standouts:


Yoga Journal. Your Daily Yoga 

Family Yoga

Yoga Journal. Living Yoga

My journey into yoga continues. I joined a gym and take regular Vinyasa (flow and breath) yoga. I even ventured into a Hot/ Bikram Yoga class where the first, very structured class was like being tortured in a sweaty sauna, and yes I went back for more. I continue to be interested in different classes and broadening my yogic horizons in mind, body and spirit.